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"I tried to shut the window."

Übersetzung:Ich habe versucht das Fenster zu zumachen.

Vor 3 Jahren

14 Kommentare


https://www.duolingo.com/muttermaria
muttermaria
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Ich versuchte das Fenster zu schließen ist besseres Deutsch, meine ich

Vor 2 Jahren

https://www.duolingo.com/christopht341622

Es IST besseres Deutsch!

Vor 2 Jahren

https://www.duolingo.com/helen669705

Genau!

Vor 1 Jahr

https://www.duolingo.com/UrmelH

Heißt es nicht :i tried: ich versuchte. I have tried : ich habe versucht ???

Vor 2 Jahren

https://www.duolingo.com/Ly_Mar
Ly_Mar
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Leider nicht. English tenses carry meanings that German tenses do not. The simplest distinction is: past perfect is to be used when the time of the event is not specified, past simple when it is, so:

  • "I've come to your house before" (egal wann)

  • "I came to your home yesterday"

Present perfect also underlines the present conditions resulting from those past actions, so:

  • "I've bought a car" (was zählt, ist, dass ich jetzt ein Auto besitze)

  • "I bought a car" (was zählt, ist, dass ich damals ein Auto kaufte).

There are also some adverbs and expressions which only take the present perfect (although some of those also accept the past simple in American English), for example just (as in "just now") and already. Ever and never only ever accept the present perfect also in America. These adverbs work this way because they imply in and of themselves that the time is unknown or irrelevant (ever and never) or that what matters is the result (I've just arrived, so now I'here; I've already done that, so no point in nagging me about it).

Another case in wich you could only use the present perfect is if you were describing an action which has been going on for a certain period of time and is still ongoing, so for example:

I've been living here for three years (Ich denke, der Satz übersetze sich wie "Ich lebe hier seit drei Jahre", aber mein Deutsch ist noch nicht so gut).

The last distinction I can think of is that for things that (have) happened in the past in an unspecified time or timeframe you would use the present perfect if there were any chance of them repeating and the past simple if you didn't think there were. This also means that for the past actions of a person it could mean using the past simple would indicate they were dead (and so they could not possibly repeat those actions), although this could potentially overlap with a still ongoing condition for continuative actions/states

Some examples to clarify:

  • She bought many cars in his lifetime (but she is now dead/she can't buy any more cars)

  • She has bought many cars (She isn't buying a car now, but she could potentially buy more in the future, she is certainly still alive)

  • She has been buying many cars (She [still] is on a car-shopping frenzy)

  • He was a good man (He is now dead, he could still be good if he were alive)

  • He has been good to me (maybe he would kill me if he saw me now, but in the past he has done something good for me and he is still alive so he might still change his mind)

P.S.: Verzeihen Sie mir, dass ich das nicht auf Deutsch habe geschrieben können; mein beschränktes Kenntnis von Deutsch machte das mir unmöglich.

Vor 1 Jahr

https://www.duolingo.com/Ly_Mar
Ly_Mar
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TL;DR: nein, weil die englischen Zeitformen anders als die deutschen wirken.

Vor 1 Jahr

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
zirkul
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Another case in wich you could only use the present perfect is if you were describing an action which has been going on for a certain period of time and is still ongoing, so for example:
I've been living here for three years

That's not Present Perfect, instead this is Present Perfect Continuous, which is a separate tense in English:
https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/quick-grammar/present-perfect-simple-and-present-perfect-continuous
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/present-perfect-continuous-tense/

Vor 9 Monaten

https://www.duolingo.com/Ly_Mar
Ly_Mar
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Ok, it's a separate tense, but the usage as a tense indicating an ongoing action which began in the past concerns both the presenent perfect and its continuous form, so the distinction here is irrelevant. In fact, the distinction between “I've lived here for...” and “I've been living here for...” is only one of focus on the uninterrupted nature of the action, still both mean essentially the same thing: I started living here some time ago and I still do now. I was using “present perfect” as an umbrella term for both the continuous and the “base” form of the tense.

Vor 9 Monaten

https://www.duolingo.com/Ly_Mar
Ly_Mar
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I made the error of not reading the links you provided before answering, because I thought I knew what they would tell me. And I kind of did, although they make a distinction that I probably make subconsciously and that I wouldn't have described in so many words before reading the article. So my updated answer is: the example I make might as well have used the present perfect simple, because the difference between the simple and continuous form of this tense in describing ongoing situations that began in the past depends on whether you perceive the situation as permanent or mutable. In any case I was purposefully using the catch-all “present perfect” without specifying simple or continuous because I meant to imply that both can refer to ongoing situations in the right conditions.

Vor 9 Monaten

https://www.duolingo.com/Schumilowa

ist das nicht die falsche Zeitform? Die Lektion ist doch Infinitiv

Vor 3 Jahren

https://www.duolingo.com/judithsimone

Infinitiv hat mit der Zeit nichts zutun, sondern ist die Grundform des Verbs (hier "to shut").
Es ist also egal, ob der Satz mit "I tried..." oder mit "I try" oder mit "I will try..." anfängt, der Infinitiv, um den es in der Lektion geht, ist "to shut" und der bleibt auf jeder Zeitstufe so.

Vor 3 Jahren

https://www.duolingo.com/Lilinanna

Es heißt "zuzumachen"

Vor 8 Monaten

https://www.duolingo.com/Mario921380

Bei Infinitiv mit zu kommt immer ein Komma gefolgt von "dass" mit doppel "s"! Richtig ist also: "Ich habe versucht, dass Fenster zu schließen. "

Vor 1 Jahr

https://www.duolingo.com/christopht341622

Nein! Das ist falsch. "dass" ist eine Konjunktion, "das" ist ein Artikel. Ein Infinitiv mit zu bekommt nur manchmal ein Komma. Die oben genannte Regel ist (so) falsch. Der Beispielsatz ist falsch und kann kaum als deutscher Satz gelten.

Vor 1 Jahr