"Somebody has new shoes."

Translation:Qualcuna ha le scarpe nuove.

5/30/2013, 6:03:50 PM

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/missyjane_t

Yes, DL had that as an alternative when I used qualcuno. Is it gender related or not? I do not know.

11/3/2014, 12:10:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CoolStuffYT
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I did!

3/26/2017, 7:21:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Duolessio
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To me, "Qualcuno" would sound better even when referring to a female.

2/22/2016, 2:08:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/stuart.hol2
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Would a native speaker tend to say nuove scarpe or scarpe nuove?

4/3/2015, 6:34:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Yulia_Shch

A native speaker will always say "le scarpe nuove")

6/21/2015, 8:23:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/italianjdl

Why not qualcuno?

8/6/2015, 6:03:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/roman2095
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Also good.

11/5/2017, 8:34:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AmirYousif2

I just find out that the Italian don't pronounce the letter h at all when i watched the interview of Alessandra del piero my favorite italiana giocatore when he came to dubai salve per alex

12/2/2015, 4:15:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveVelo1

I believe "scarpe di nuove" should be accepted.

4/3/2016, 5:05:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

DaveVelo1: I wouldn't agree. Use of 'di' as in 'scarpe di pelle' is appropriate when you're talking about an object and the material it's made of. "nuove" is simply an adjective and sounds unnatural if used the way you're suggesting.

4/3/2016, 9:23:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Procrastinans

Why the article when we're talking about indefinite shoes?

10/29/2016, 12:23:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MaddyMarziani

Why do you need to use "le" in this scenario?

11/29/2016, 9:03:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Maddy...Use of the article in Italian often differs from that of English. English doesn't use one in generalizations e.g. while Italian often does. "Life is beautiful" / "La vita e' bella". In this sentence I believe it's used for a similar reason, though clearly it's not a generalization.

11/29/2016, 11:29:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HydraBianca

can it be "ha qualcuna..."?

10/11/2014, 3:04:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
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I believe that word order would make it into a question.

11/4/2015, 11:21:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OHHHHTHATSABINGO

why not qualcune

3/24/2015, 2:47:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
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Do you say "someones" in English?

11/9/2015, 10:29:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Correcta: You can only say it if you make it a possessive: "Someone's" shoes are in the hall.

11/9/2015, 11:02:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
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Did I ask whether he said "someone's" or did I ask whether he said "someones"?

11/10/2015, 3:46:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

I just gave you a lingot though for the life of me I don't know why. And I'm going to chalk up the fact that I'm totally confused by our exchanges to its being 2:45 in the a.m. here and the fact that I've not had nearly enough coffee, rather than to the 2 days of lost sleep over my concern for the shoes, whose ever shoes they may wind up being . :-) -- ps. I'm really impressed by how many languages you're learning, seriously.

11/10/2015, 8:51:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
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DogHouse3 proposed the word "qualcune", which is the incorrect plural of a singular-only word, like "someones" or "somebodies". As a reductio ad absurdum, I rhetorically asked him whether he'd use the plural "someones" in English, e.g. "someones have new shoes". Of course he wouldn't: it sounds equally absurd in English and Italian.

You then got the wrong end of the stick and started telling me about the possessive word "someone's".


Thanks! It's just my job though.

11/10/2015, 9:36:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Correcta: Thanks for your reply of a few minutes ago. I think we're finally on the same page.

11/10/2015, 9:45:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Correcta: Here's what you wrote & what I was responding to: Do you say "someones" in English?

11/10/2015, 7:37:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
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You haven't answered my question.

That is to say, anyone can copy and paste. But the answer to my question was "Ah, my mistake. You of course asked him whether he said 'someones'. What I said about the possessive form was utterly irrelevant. Silly me."

11/10/2015, 7:46:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

I don't understand what it is you're asking. Sorry.

11/10/2015, 7:59:18 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
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I asked literally what I asked. You are overthinking it.

11/10/2015, 8:08:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

I believe that'd be plural feminine, meaning any women.

6/4/2015, 10:30:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/agiordan123

The plural feminine of "qualcuna" is "alcune". "Qualcune" does not exist. It is:

  • sing. masc. "Qualcuno" (you might also find "alcun" or "alcuno")
  • plur. masc. you might find "Alcuni" (even though qualcuno refers to an indefinite group of people).
  • sing. fem. "Qualcuna" (you might also find "alcuna" )
  • plur. fem. "Alcune"

Hope it helps.

6/29/2015, 9:17:44 PM
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