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"J'ai beaucoup trop à faire."

Translation:I have far too much to do.

5 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cotesa
cotesa
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What then would be the french for "I have much too much to do"? To me, "way too much" is more informal speech.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EthanTown

I agree that way too much is more informal, but much too much? I would have thought the more formal English would be far too much. Much too much sounds odd to me, although I live in New Zealand, so maybe our English is different to yours.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Australian here. "Much too much" is something I use, along with "far too much" and "way too much".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamtSound

You could also say "I have too many things to do."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cottany

I feel like this should be reported. It's a correct translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucioarisci

don't you think that the correct translation should be: I have too much to do?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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"I have too much to do." = "J'ai trop à faire."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samy1979
Samy1979
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Should be right. Duolingo accept it. What is the alternative?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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I already wrote the translation for "I have too much to do." in my previous post. If Duolingo accepts it it's a mistake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukelbd

Why beaucoup trop instead of trop beaucoup?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed.Re

I typed " I have a lot to do" it wasn't accepted. Is it wrong English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedPanda757069

That is correct English. It should be accepted, as it means effectively the same.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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No, it shouldn't be accepted. "A lot" and "too much" don't mean the same thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djbrubacher

What is the difference between "J'ai trop à faire" and "J'ai beaucoup trop à faire." Are they translated the same?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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The same difference that there is between "I have too much to do." and "I have way too much to do." : emphasis.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/on.the.brink
on.the.brink
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Thank you for the clarification. I see the combination 'beaucoup trop' means 'far too' or 'much too' in other phrases as well.

beaucoup trop fort = much too loud or far too loud
il parle beaucoup trop = he talks far too much

So, to pull together what other comments have mentioned, several correct ways to translate "'J'ai beaucoup trop à faire" would be:

I have way too much to do.
I have far too much to do.
I have much too much to do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KsanterX

Why do you need à here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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For the same reason you need the "to" in the english sentence.

  • something to do
  • quelque chose à faire
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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It's tricky in English because sometimes "to" marks an infinitive and sometimes it doesn't! And many of our verb conjugations are identical to the infinitive, making it difficult to recognise when they occur.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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That doesn't change that "to" and "à" have the same usage in this sentence: they are both prepositions, and if you understand why you need "to" in the English sentence, then you understand why you need "à" in the French sentence, which was the question.

But of course "à" does not always translate to "to" and vice versa.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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My point is that most people don't understand the difference between a verb after the preposition "to" and an infinitive.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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Most people? I doubt that.

But if there are indeed people who don't understand this difference, then the problem is first and foremost in their knowledge of English I would say, since programs where you learn any specific language from English assumes that you understand the basics of English grammar and are at least proficient in English over-all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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I learnt to speak English as a child and I spoke it perfectly without understanding any grammar. Grammar is useful for learning a language or discussing how a language works. It is not necessary for a native speaker to know any grammar in order to speak properly.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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I don't understand why you bring up native speakers all of a sudden.

1 year ago