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  5. "An coinín."

"An coinín."

Translation:The rabbit.

September 8, 2014

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guupi

coinín is very close to German Kaninchen, considering that -chen is just a diminutive suffix.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Like the older English word “coney”, they might be descendants of the Latin word cuniculus (which is also a diminutive).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

You're correct. What is awesome, however, is that Latin borrowed the word itself from Proto-Basque!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gpgallagher

That is going back to the very roots of European speech, isn't it? Fascinating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcilio_mosco

And to make it more interesting, basque is an isolate, the only living european language that is not from the indo-european family of languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

Yep, Basque is an isolate, but aren't you forgetting the Uralic group, Finnish Estonian and Hungarian? ;) I'd add Maltese and Crimean Tatar to the list of non Indo-European languages too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Finnish and Hungarian are not Indo European either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/legatrix

That is indeed pretty cool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1musketieragain

It's even closer to the Dutch 'konijn'!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

And even closer to the Danish "Kanin".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbrunetiere

even in Croatian, we use "kunić" (pronounced /kǔniːtɕ/) for the domestic rabbit (somewhat analogous to the English distinction between 'rabbit' and 'hare'). also, we call the marten "kuna", which provided the name for the official currency!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

Actually 'rabbit' refers to both wild and domestic animals in English. 'Hare' refers to a separate species, which is larger and famous for fast running.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

It sounds similar to the Portuguese "coelhino" which means "little rabbit".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsMirDur

and conejo in Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

Very similar sounding to the Catalan conill (especially the Majorcan pronounciation "coniy").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielmonteiro16

Portuguese coelho, I think 'cause cuniculus turned into coelho when dropping the N and assimilating the CL to LL to LH. I am not sure, cf. Italian GL. I read sth about this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jakebob38

Is there a difference between rabbit, bunny, and hare in Irish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

The hare would be an giorria.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac_Luna_

I find that the most consistent word I've come across in different languages is some derivative of "kanin/conin", meaning rabbit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

Very interesting. English and French are the odd ones. Hmmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcilio_mosco

Is this word related to portuguese "coelho" (rabbit) ? They sound very similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenisDamalo

Is there a diminutive version that means bunny?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mog326555

The -ín already makes it a diminutive!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toxicapathy

Is it inaccurate to approximate the "oi" sound here to the German "ö"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DizzyOdd

I think so. Its like a very short ö. Coinín. The 'ín' is the stressed syllable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elise676113

Can I translate "dwarf rabbit" to "mioncoinín", just like the word "mionhamstar"? We love our little Netherland Dwarf rascal, and he's definitely a conversation topic for us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

You can look up technical or specialist terminology in An Bunachar Náisiúnta Téarmaíochta don Ghaeilge/"The National Terminology Database for Irish" at www.tearma.ie. There is an entry for the mionchoinín gorm in the rabbit category.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elise676113

Thank you! I wonder why coinín is lenited though? Does this have something to do with the colour? I haven't made a lot of progression in Gaeilge yet, but I hope I can learn more to understand my favourite songs ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

The second part of a compound word is typically lenited.

In general, a mutation like lenition comes after the thing that causes it, not before, so the word gorm wouldn't be the source of mionchoinín.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dax907788

Old french 'conil', now 'lapin'

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