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  5. "I give everything to you."

"I give everything to you."

Translation:Tugaim gach rud duit.

September 8, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaitlyn_MacKay

What not tugaim gach rud chugat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Chuig is used as “to” when the direction of the action is being emphasized; do is the general indirect object “to”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewWill58932

Thank you for this! I appreciate the clear explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCassifier

Chuig = towards. General rule I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonBeak

What about "Tugaim gach rud duitse"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzxj

That emphasizes that I'm giving to you, as opposed to someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/17000days

Any reason why 'duibh' isn't allowed, or is that just a mistake?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

It would need be "daoibh". If that is not accepted then it is worth reporting.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Prepositions-3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/17000days

Oh blast... I will never learn to spell Irish!

Thank you for answering, Ballygawley!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minJp

Why was Tugann mé gach rud duit marked incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Duolingo is designed to teach An Caighdeán Oifigiúil. As a courtesy to people who are more familiar with one of the regional dialects, a vast amount of additional work was done to add non-Caighdeán responses as alternative answers. Use the Report flag and submit "My answer should be accepted" to request that your answer be added as an alternative answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCD0HE

Hello everyone! Would someone be able to "comment" on the etymology of gach rud, please? It helps me remember when I can make links.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Etymology?
According to wiktionary.org, the etymology of gach is

From Middle Irish gach, from Old Irish cach, proclitic form of cách, from Proto-Celtic *kʷākʷos

and the etymology of rud is

From Old Irish rét


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCD0HE

Thanks for the Wiktionary link, Knocksedan! :-) I hadn't thought to look there, and will read it with interest. Edit: gach/cach in Welsh is useful, as I can see


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cnuas

Tugaim duit gach rud. Sílim go bhfuil sé sin níos fearr, nach bhfuil?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Tabhair do is a phrasal verb, so that would certainly be acceptable. The FGB offers some examples where do doesn’t come first though, e.g. Thug siad cuireadh dúinn (“They gave us an invitation”), Thug sí comhairle mhaith duit (“She gave you good advice”), etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dionysius7

Why not "Tugaim gach uile rud duit."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCassifier

"Uile" is probably a Munster term. I don't know the Munster dialect that well but I know they are the oddballs of Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Because the course creators didn’t anticipate it as a correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCassifier

Uile is an emphasis I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spjh1966

With an Ulster background, and maybe a bit of Scottish Gaelic influence, I would naturally say "gach aon rud"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

So "duit" is "to you"? Somewhere I missed that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes, duit is 'to you' (singular)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chr.Perrotta

Should this "duit" be pronounced as "dhuit" as in "Dia duit"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCassifier

No. I'd say "d-wit-ch" since there is no dh to be pronounced as dh. But I have a sort of Connacht with minor Ulster influences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallMacGi

Tugaim achan rud duit. Accepted 28/04/2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneNoone1

In its answer it says DUIT. Do i understand that in offering DUITSE that it is pl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

The plural is daoibh.

duitse is an emphatic form of the singular duit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TayLearnsGaeilge

I've yet to ever have "duitse" come up in my learning. Can somebody please try to explain when and why this would be used over just duit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

I don't think Duolingo has any exercises with mise or tusa either, but they are all emphatic or contrastive forms of the pronouns, and very widely used. Here are some examples using duitse from the NEID - I've used bold to indicate that you are emphasising the you in these expressions:

"what's it to you?" - cén gnó duitse é?
"this email is for your eyes only" - duitse amháin an ríomhphost seo
"my door is always open for you" - bím i gcónaí ar fáil duitse
"it's easy for you to talk" - is éasca duitse bheith ag caint

(The NEID doesn't do "literal" translations, as they aren't very useful in many cases).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanWorswi

Wheres this duitse come from, Ive never seen this one before


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Irish adds emphasis to nouns, pronouns and prepositional pronouns by adding sa or se as a suffix. As explained earlier, duitse is an emphatic form of duit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkAdams211319

I just won't add emphasis when speaking Irish, then.

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