"Tugaimgachrudduit."

Translation:I give everything to you.

4 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DrJohnHouse
DrJohnHouse
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

This is a sad sentence for me. :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haremnights

:( I understand. It came across sweet to me, but I think it depends on what's going on in your life when you hear it. A few months ago this would have meant something different to me than it does today.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gia758609

I understand how you feel... :'(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oisint
oisint
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

Why, may I ask?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/furiouslygiraffe

Could this also be "I give you everything"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambertsimnel
lambertsimnelPlus
  • 25
  • 25
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6
  • 6
  • 543

Yes. That's an equally good translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trinitythex

I typed: I give it all to you. And it didn't accept it. Maybe there is something about all vs. everything in Irish?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vam1980
vam1980
  • 25
  • 22
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 673

'duit' is pronounced with a 'd', in 'dia duit' it was pronounced with a 'g'. How come? Something to do with the ending of the word in front of it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Not really. In Connemara, the prepositions beginning with "d" are pronounced as if they are "dh" (and you'll often see it written as dhuit). This is like the sound for "ch", but voiced, so it sounds more like a "g".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zylbath
Zylbath
  • 22
  • 15
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 386

Actually, the broad 'dh' is more pronounced like a French or German /r/. But since many second learner of Gaeilge are unable to pronounce most of its sounds they pronounce it more like /g/.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The uvular fricative, which is what French uses, doesn't exist in Irish. I was talking about the voiced velar fricative (/ɣ/), which is like <ch> except voiced, meaning it sounds more like English <g> than English <k> (which is what <ch> in Irish is like).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zylbath
Zylbath
  • 22
  • 15
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 386

I was talking about similarity, you are right they are not the same sounds. But French /r/ is more similar to /ɣ/ than a /g/, which isn't even a fricative. Since when is /k/ like Irish /ch/? Isn't that only the pronounciation of second learners that can't pronounce the 'ich' and 'ach' sound? Motherspeakers mostly have /x/ and /ç/. In my unprofessional eyes as a stranger the pronounciation of Irish is in a sorry state for it mostly has speakers that learned it as a second language and are unable to pronounce some of the sounds like the tongue tip trill /r/, /ɣ/, /x/ and /ç/.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I know native speakers don't use it. But I'm trying to explain to learners how to make it and what it sounds like compared to English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mediterranean

So, dom sounds dhom in Connemara?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yep. It's pronounced as if it's lenited.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
  • 11
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

In Ulster 'dom' is prononced 'doo'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luiz.calheiros

So can I write "dhuit" to replace that "duit"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes. That is accurate Connacht Irish, and you'll often see it spelled that way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jish
Jish
  • 13
  • 12
  • 5
  • 3

what do you mean by prepositions? As in this rule would only apply to a subset of d-initial words for Conamara speakers?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

In the inflected forms of the prepositions do, you'll hear dhuit instead of duit. The d sounds like an unlenited g in the regular form (as if written ).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cthepeterson

Why does this not also mean "I give everything for you"? Duit is listed as meaning either for you or to you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1602

Which meaning of “for” do you have in mind?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoisinDubh1

If it helps, the broad "dh" sound (as in "dhuit") described below is also found in some dialects of Dutch, in Arabic, and, I'm told, in Turkish. Not that I know much about those languages, just dabble in looking at sounds.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jake540444

So can "tugaim" be used as both "I take" and "I give"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianEllio16
BrianEllio16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6

Tógaim is I take. Tugaim is I give.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14

What does "togaim" mean? It always says I used the wrong word, not that I misspelt "tugaim".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bishoz

"Tabhair" is give. So... what gives? Why is it Tugaim?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

"Because it is" is the short answer, I'm afraid. "Tabhair" is the infinitive (To give), but the present-tense finite forms are "Tugaim, Tugann tú" etc. You might as well ask (about French), "If it's 'aller' why is it 'je vais'?" It just is...!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warder9

TO BLATHE

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Codester3

The way she’s saying “duit” sounds like the English pronunciation of “dut”. Early in the lessons, we learned “Dia duit”, and it was pronounced more like “ditch” or “witch”.

Is there a difference in pronunciation based on the meaning, or is that just another acceptable way to say the same word?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cat5STORM

Is this like Irish marriage vows or something?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoneHiker

This doesn't work on ladies trust me. They walk all over you.

1 day ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.