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"We do not have a lot of income."

Translation:No tenemos muchos ingresos.

5 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/at2004
at2004
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Why "muchos ingresos" and not "mucho ingreso"? "Income" is not plural.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/todofixthis
  • ingreso means 'entrance' in Spanish.
  • ingresos means 'income'.

The idea of a noun referring to one concept in the singular form but a different concept in plural form is probably a little weird to a native English speaker; I'm trying to think if there are any examples of that in English, but I can't come up with any.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albertyac

There are several examples in English: One is "time vs times". Time (noncount) = tiempo and times (instances) = veces

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zapper112
zapper112
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Well, they do give us a OTP (One 'Time' Password).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonJuandelaBarca

How would you say the building has many entrances in Spanish?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albertyac

Income is noncount in English, but in Spanish it can be counted/pluralized. Other examples are: Furniture = muebles, news = noticias, and advice = consejos.

Perhaps these links will help. Take a look at the different meanings of ingreso. Maybe even become familiar with its compound forms: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=ingreso

Take a look at the different uses of ingresos and its compound forms; http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=ingresos

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/picsa
picsa
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I don't understand that either

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

I think it's because "ingresos" IS the plural form of "ingreso" and even though it gives it a different meaning ( income rather than entrance) it still follows the "plural"rule in spanish... ie "muchos" rather than "mucho"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

It's interesting that they don't make a distinction in the dictionary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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In English, there is actually a distinction between "income" and "incomes" - "My job provides a good income" but "my wife and I have good incomes" - does this exist in Spanish? The correct and incorrect answers seem to suggest singular and plural are interchangeable.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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It reminds me of the English word "fund". English speakers would not say "I am out of fund" but "I am out of funds." There are many sentences that use "fund" (they set up an emergency fund) but when an individual might have multiple sources of income, "funds" sounds better.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albertyac

You hit the nail on the head, geneven. Ingreso is a one time or one lump thing, such as ingreso anual=Annual income. Ingresos is a repetitive thing. So since our Duo sentence says "a lot of" instead of "a big/good" income, it follows that we need to translate to ingresos. You may want to take a look at the links I posted above.

4 years ago