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"¿Hablas español?"

Translation:Do you speak Spanish?

5 years ago

133 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/iinathanii

I took spanish in school this is teaching me a lot better

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sylverone

Tu` tambien?! (You too?!) ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peterng303

Yes i agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lumpylove110301

im in sixth grade and i got it correct im so excited im learning Spanish

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelina_Joy

me too! I am really glad that I now know Spanish really well because my whole family speaks Spanish only and I always feel left out. I am not lonely and left out anymore!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mysticcromimi

Hola,im not from u.s.a im from morocco we speak arabic but im very happy because i now speak spanish i learn it just if i see violetta some day,and i just have 11 years

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

mysticcromimi, keep working on your spanish. you are very close to spain and maybe one day you will go there and you will know the language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mike.c.35

Duolingo teaches a little near the Latin American side of spanish

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Oh that's fantastic! And being around them and talking to them will help you learn faster too, and it will be easier to remember what you've learnt.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davish

I don't hear a question. How do you know it's not "you speak Spanish"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilach123

Because it has "?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

listen closely and you'll hear the inflection at the end of the sentence

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Don_It
Don_It
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I'm sorry, but I did listen closely, and it does not sound like a question, it sounds like a statement. The recording for "¿Hablas inglés?" is much better.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonaldoTerra

Yes, it's hard. I speak Portuguese (very close to Spanish), even with a really similar mother language is hard to tell the difference hearing only the computer... real life, latinos will stress way more the intonation. Cheers!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/animallover10

The sentence has a "¿" at the beginning and a "?" at the end.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelina_Joy

I usually don't put any puncuation at the end and I get it right all of the time. you don't have to worry about it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

Angelina_Joy, yo también AND i also don't capitalize and it's always right. i do it to save time and i know duo will accept it. also, it DOES NOT impede learning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GWAllen
GWAllen
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I think it does impede learning. The reason I looked in this discussion was to confirm that, what in English would be considered proper nouns like English and Spanish, really shouldn't be capitalized in Spanish. Different languages have different capitalization rules, e.g. German capitalizes all nouns, so it's important for the presentation to get that right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olivia.harvey
olivia.harvey
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Exactly. If you know the correct way, you don't have to. I text without punctuation and caps sometimes, but that doesn't mean I have a problem with English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Empyric

"You" in front of the sentence wasn't so obvious.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SenorAlto

This confused me when I took my first lessons. But conjugating a verb in Spanish does not require a pronoun to accompany it, even though Spanish speakers will often use pronouns to clarify meaning when there is confusion or for emphasis. Moreover, "hablas" is only used to mean "(you) speak," so as Maira said, it's obvious and acceptable in this case to omit the "you" (tú).

Spanish grammar does not correspond one-to-one with English grammar, and in fact, there is no helping verb version of our "do" in Spanish, either. (Keep in mind that "hacer" means "to do", but it means the literal sense, not the helping verb sense used in questions in English). So, in Spanish, to write a yes or no question they simply conjugate the verb and put question marks around the sentence. And when they speak it they raise the intonation of their voice at the end of the question in an inquisitive manner. It's really fun and refreshing to practice yes/no questions in Spanish :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaiaraLopes

"Hablas" is only used with "Tú", so it's quite obvious. =)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julesp89

There isn't any "tu" in the sentence

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Hello Jordan!

In Español, verbs are conjugated according to the pronoun. So the form/spelling of the verb alters according to whether you're talking about yourself or someone else or some other people (plural). There are very specific rules about HOW verbs are conjugated according to the person you're talking about so when you see a verb, its spelling is telling you exactly what the pronoun is. Sooo ... you don't HAVE to use the pronoun and often times it is just dropped altogether.

A quick example using this question to illustrate what I mean.

Hablar is the verb "to speak". Since it is an -ar verb (a verb ending with "ar") it is conjugated like so

  • yo (I) - o
  • tú - as
  • él/ella/ud - a
  • nosotros - amos
  • ells/uds - an

so that means, for hablar, we drop the "ar" and add the proper ending depending on the pronoun we're using :)

  • Yo - hablo
  • Tú - hablas
  • él/ella/ud - Habla
  • nosotros - hablamos
  • ells/uds - hablan

So you see, each conjugation form of the verb can ONLY apply to specific pronouns. So, when speaking, we can safely drop the actual pronoun because the verb tells exactly who or what we're talking about! It's kind of cool actually if you really think about it. :)

And just so you don't get all annoyed, this is also done in most other languages as well (the dropping of the pronoun part) when you know, or the rest of the sentence implies, who or what the subject is.

Random friend: "what did you do today?"

You: "Sat around, mainly. Ate some lunch at that new deli around the corner and then went to the park. Saw Sally too. Wasn't too happy that I haven't called."

See how that response you gave your friend could have been littered with pronouns?

"I sat around, mainly. I ate some lunch at that new deli around the corner and then I went to the park. I saw Sally too. She wasn't too happy that I haven't called her"

While we English speakers don't have the conjugation rules of Español, we do have our own ways of dropping that pronoun whenever the subject is obvious/known and it doesn't make the sentence awkward, ya know? Like in that final sentence of my example. I pretty much had to use the phrase "I haven't called" or else the sentence flat out sounds retarded.

Here are some additional resources.

introduction to the rules and concepts of conjugation en Español

Spanish.about.com intro to conjugation

studyspanish.com verbs --- this site should be one of your main go-to resources, period. It's fantastic and loaded with with all the information you could want regarding all areas of learning Spanish. Specifically on that page make sure to read the 1st 4 lessons on the left hand side (-er, -ar, -ir verbs, regular verbs)

Websites that offer full conjugation for any spanish verb (These two sites are great to go and see the results of all possible conjugations for the various verbs. Articles explaining things are fantastic and you must read them and understand, but once you have that knowledge, these sites are great to test your knowledge by entering in a verb (say, hacer or comer or caminar)

conjugation.org

spanishdict.com conjugation -- this is another site that should be bookmarked and in your dedicated "learning Spanish folder)

Lists of various verbs for you to test out your new mutant conjugation powers with

Spanish vocab list -- (scroll down to where it says verbs AR 1-3, Verbs ER and verbs IR. Just click those links, pick a verb, think about how it would be conjugated and then feed the verb into one of those sites I just gave you (conjugation.org and spanishdict) and see if you were right!). It helps to practice speaking them out loud WITH the pronoun and then without in order to get a feel for it.

Application

Imagine you're talking about yourself and say, out loud "Caminar. To walk. I walk is "Yo camino". "camino" also means I walk. I walk "Yo camino" I walk "camino". "She walks" is ella camina. She walks can be just "camina". She walks... "camina".

Etc..etc..

Or make it a wee bit more relative. Imagine someone is asking you if you DO a verb and then your answer to that question. And say this stuff out loud lol. It works with almost any verb really.

Verb: Comer - to eat

English

"do you eat rice?"
"yes, I eat rice."

Español with pronoun

"¿Tú comes arroz?"
"Sí, yo como arroz."

Español without pronoun

"¿comes arroz?
"Sí, como arroz."

Verb: Nadar - to swim

English

"Do you swim?"
"No, I do not swim"

Español with pronoun

"¿Tú nadas?
"No. Yo No nado"

Español without pronoun

"¿Nadas?"
"No. No nado"

Well, hope that helped.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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All you said was grate! I liked the English example phrases =D but you are wrong in a Spanish example you gave, you mixed "tú" and "usted" conjugations:

English

"Do you eat rice?"

"Yes, I eat rice."

Español with pronoun

"¿Tú comeS arroz?"and also can be "¿Comes tú arroz?"/"¿Comes arroz, tú?

"Sí, yo como arroz."

"¿Vos comés arroz?" and also can be "¿Comés vos arroz?"/"¿Comés arroz, vos?

"Sí, yo como arroz."

"¿Usted come arroz?" and also can be "¿Come usted arroz?"/"¿Come arroz, usted?

"Sí, yo como arroz."

Español without pronoun

"¿ComeS arroz?"

"Sí, como arroz."

"¿Comés arroz?"

"Sí, como arroz."

"¿Come arroz?"

"Sí, como arroz."

I found these sites, and look fine, so maybe can help too:

http://www.linguee.es/ you can search a word an see example phrases where you can find the word you searched.

http://conjugador.reverso.net there you can cunjugate verbs and change the language to Spanish, German, Englishor or French.

http://www.elcastellano.org/ there you can find questions about all about Spanish, and all questions are answered correctly by one person, but is in Spanish.

http://www.onoma.es/ there you can conjugate in Spanish too, have all the tenses.

And you have also the RAE page (in Spanish). You just need to search the verb you want to conjugate and next you need to click in "conjugar" button. It will shows ALL the possible conjugations:

http://lema.rae.es/drae/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baggeera

That was extremley helpful, muches gracias.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

de nada :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Fixed! Thanks for the correction. I knew/know it had the -s there at the end but I simply forgot to type it. I think it was late ;)

Thanks for the additional links!

Also, I had not been paying much attention to the vosotros form when I first wrote this since I am closer to Latin America, but I have started speaking with someone from Spain and would love to visit there and I have now begun to pay attention to the vosotros form. Now I just have to go back and practice all those verbs with vosotros and practice the possessive vuestros! lol

Gracias mi amigo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Cool!, don't worry =D and sorry for correct you a simple type error =P

De nada! I hope the all sites will be useful!

Hahaha, well, when I have searched those sites, I tried to find sites where were showing the vos vosotros conjugation. And the last two have it =D so, those will be more useful to you to learn vosotros and vuestos =D

Oh, you are welcome!!!! but I'm woman XD so, it's "amiga" =D

P.S.: I gave you a lingot XD grate post!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Ahhh mi amiga! lo siento lol. tu necisito un ... picture lol. I don't know why the default picture is only male. Especially since so many languages have gender based words. You'd think that they would have an option for male or female facial silhouettes if you decide not to put a picture up on your profile. Oh well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baggeera

Gracias mi amiga.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diizon

when and why are ( ¿...?) used for?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Questions. You have to put an inverted question mark before questions in Spanish. It works the same for (¡...!) in exclamations. I wish we had those in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejoguzrojas
alejoguzrojas
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In spanish we mark the beginning of a question... for example: "Voy a ir al parque, ¿me acompañas?" that would be in english: I'm going to the park, would you come with me? The "¿" sometimes is not used, which is tecnically considered wrong. I don't use it, for example, in informal conversations like in facebook.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Yes, but don't say it is correct on internet, 'cause it is still wrong, like write "hey, y u 2 dnt come to mah' hous tomorro'"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Allways, from the start of the question to the end of the question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jalamalan

we say "speak spanish?" you is understood. you didn't show a pronoun and neither do we...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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In Spanish, yes, of course. In English, not, you need the pronoun...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spierce7981

I put "speak Spanish?" and got it wrong for leaving out You. So you're saying I would have been understood, if I was asking that to someone?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buiosu

In Spanish the verbs endings depend on the person. Yo com!o! pan = como pan = I eat bread, Ella com!e! pan = she eats pan, etc. IMHO for "hablo" and "hablas" you can ommit the person because it is clear what the person is. Probably ella/usted/etc. can also be ommited depending on the situation - please correct me if I'm wrong. E.g.: - ¿Qué hace ella? - (Ella) Habla por teléfono.

I'm not sure. But if you see "hablas" you know it's about "tú" and that I'm sure. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Yes, sincne Spanish have the person included in the verb, you don't need to use the pronoun, and so you will understand with the context. See, in English you have no difference between "tú", and "ustedes", the two are "you", then, how you understand which is?, well, it is the same in Spanish, but Spanish is a little more easy since you have the pronoun included in the verb...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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In English the pronoun is required, because generally every sentence must have a subject and a verb. The subject would not be known if it is omitted, because we do not change verb forms for each person. I speak, you speak, they speak, we speak. When the subject is omitted in English, the subject is assumed to be "you" and this is permissible only when it is an instruction or command, and it should include "please" to be polite. "Please speak Spanish" is very different from "Do you speak Spanish".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Someone marked me down for this, so I guess I was not very clear. The question was, why is "speak English" not correct. The answer is "speak English" does not convey who is speaking. It could be "I speak English", "you speak English", "they speak English", or "we speak English". It is necessary to include the subject, which could be one of the above pronouns or a name (The Johnson's speak Spanish, the Brazilian's speak Spanish) so that the listener/reader knows who is speaking. English requires a subject because the verb form is the same for several personal pronouns. The subject is not required in Spanish, because the verb has a different ending for every person (hablo, hablas, habla, hablamos, hablan). Since the verb form tells you which person it is, you can omit the pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nm1tch3ll

direct translation is speak spanish? so why is it wrong without the 'do you'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

nm1tch3ll, the DIRECT translation for ?hablas espanol? is DO you speak spanish or are you speaking spanish

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Do you speak Spanish? = ¿Hablas español?/¿Hablas tú español?/¿Tú hablas español?/¿Hablas español, tú?

"Are you speak" is wrong, 'cause it is not the form in English to ask, you should ask Are you speaking?, then you can translated to ¿Estás hablando?/¿Estás tú hablando?/¿Tú estás hablando?/¿Estás hablando, tú?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

Yumi.V, look at the book "501 spanish verbs", page xviii. it shows the THREE translations for present tense of comer as 1. i eat, 2. i do eat or 3. i am eating. ALL verbs have a similar translation. the present progressive with estar,e.g., estoy comiendo means i am eating RIGHT NOW!!!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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I knew that.... I don't get what you mean.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

Yumi.V, read your comment above about "are you speaking". your comment doesn't show that you "knew that"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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I really don't get what you meant, sorry.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Spanishspeak123, I gave you a thumbs up, because your comment is correct. I don't know why someone marked your comment down, unless you made an error that you have corrected.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Because in English the subject is required unless it is a command or instruction. The sentence given in Spanish is clearly a question, not a command. See my answer above to spierce7981. If you were commanding someone to speak Spanish, I think you would say "Por favor hable el español." ()I haven't learned this yet, just using computer translators.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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In Spanish, you don't need it. See, if you put the signs at the start and the end of the question, the question is understanded. You can put the verb and next the pronoun, or viceversa and the question is still right and can uderstanded. It is a sound thing, when you ask, you change the sound than when you answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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In English you have to put "do you" since if you cut it, the question can't be understanded, and is understanded like an order. In English you have to say if the phrase is a question or if is an answer and allways put the pronoun. In Spanish, it is not the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Hey all, closing this discussion as all possible questions have indeed been answered, and then some. Please remember to read the comments to search for any answers BEFORE commenting, so that we can keep these discussions clean for users that come behind you. Thanks!

~ Alexis

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davish

How do you know it's a question? It sounds like a statement.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sylverone

It's a machine voice, so it might be harder to tell than with a real person. I'm not sure. I was able to hear it, but I've listened to native speakers a little in other lessons, so I might have an advantage.

Best wishes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I marked your answer up; I don't know why someone marked it down. I agree with you. This Duolingo robot does not have the same intonation as a human being. With a real human you would have better sound quality and even more important, a context, so it would be obvious whether the speaker was asking a question or making a statement.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Look at the phrase, have puntuaction, have "¿?". It is a question... it is not that difficult.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

the "audio only" questions (type what you hear) share the same discussions as the normal "translate this sentence that you see" questions...

@Davish. In Spanish you need to listen to the intonation (volume/pitch) of the voice rise at the end of whatever is being said. Their questions, much like ours, have a change in the inflection/intonation/pitch of the voice at the end. Theirs goes up whereas in English, most of the time it goes down or fluctuates up and then down.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Ok, didn't knew that, sorry.

In that case, in Spanish, the questions turn high-pitched at the begining or/and at the end. E.g.:

¿CÓMO estÁS? > estoy bien.

¿ADÓNDE irás el JUEves? > iré a coMER al parque.

¿HABLAS espaÑOL? > hablo español.

But, remember, in a real conversation this things change, because words have more meanings and emotions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chileconcarney

I answered "Speak Spanish?" And it said I was wrong. No where does it imply that only one person is being asked.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

chileconcarney, hablas refers to "tu" and THAT is only one person, i.e., 2nd person SINGULAR

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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In English is allways needed the pronoun...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mick88

Why is "Do you talk Spanish?" wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBrandonAr

It's just the wrong verb. That doesn't make sense in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percy33

Hablas espanol? = Do you speak spanish? Yet reversed in another question Do you speak spanish? my answer was Hablas espanol? was incorrect. The correct answer beinf Tu hablas espanol? How come?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Duolingo is sometimes incomplete, so in English for Spanish speakers. Your answer was right, only if you put the ñ letter and the ¿ sign. You can put the "tú" next to the verb, before the verb, or cut it off, it is the same, don't worry, just put it for Duolingo or report the phrase :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mycah1

I can't tell if hablas is feminine or masculine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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The verb form is dependent on person and tense, not gender. By "person" we mean 1st person (I or me), 2nd person (you), and 3rd person (he/she/it or him/her/it). "Tense" conveys when the action occurs - present, past, future, etc. (It is more complicated than that, but when you understand this much then you can search for "verb conjugation" on the Internet and find all the details you need.)

"Hablas" is used with 2nd person informal - e.g. "tú." You can say "tú hablas," but just "hablas" is enough because anything other than 2nd person informal would require a different verb. Yo hablo, tú hablas, él/ella/usted habla. If you say "hablo" or "hablas" you don't need a pronoun, because it is clear who the person is by the verb ending. If the subject is 3rd person, then you need to use a name or pronoun so the listener knows whether you mean he, she or it. A good site for all the forms of any Spanish verb: http://www.conjugation.org.

Nouns and pronouns have "person" and "number": él - ella - es; niña - niño, nosotras - nosotros.

Adjectives have different endings depending on the person and number of the nouns and pronouns they modify. For example, rojo, roja, rojos, rojas.

So first identify - subject, verb, and object of your sentence. Then note whether the subject is 1st, 2nd, 3rd person, singular or plural. This determines which pronoun to use, and from that you can determine which ending you need on the adjective. Big chicken, little chicken, brown chicken, etc. The forms for "big" " little" and "brown" change depending on the noun they refer to.

After you have identified the subject and its modifiers, then think about when (now, past or future) to determine the tense. Look on a conjugation chart and find the verb form that goes with the person/number and the tense.

Don't think about objects for now! We will learn that in later lessons.

I hope the above helps to answer your question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

fantastic post. This should not be down here at the bottom. Here is a lingot and an upvote for you kind sir.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buiosu

But is it a problem indeed? In English you also can't see if "you" is f or m. In my native language, Polish, it's the same. Personally I don't know any language that differentiates "you" and "you" according to sex.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobmar005

I had the some question. espanol is masculine, so way is it "hablAS espanol" not "hablO espanol"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

jacobmar005, espanol is not the subject and in this case has nothing to do with the verb. the verb tells who performs the action. hablas="you" as the subject and hablo="i" as the subject. the endings "o", "as", "a", "mos" and "an" tell who performs the action

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobmar005

oh, right! Like the difference between como, come, and comes. Which would be I eat, she/he eats, and you eat. I didn't realize I would be relearning English when I decided to pick up Spanish. Should have thought of this sooner.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Czesuaf

When I click the word "Hablas" in order to hear one more time, I hear sth like "aublas" (not "ablas") Is it only my impression?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buiosu

Indeed. I think the synthesizer isn't perfect when it comes to speak 'v' after 'a'. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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It is sound good for me, I speak Spanish... Maybe it is a hear problem like I have with English...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

"It sounds good/fine to me. I speak Spanish though. So maybe it is just a listening problem like I have with English"

Just giving you some help with your English :).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Ooooh, I didn't read what I wrote XD my English teacher of high school could kill me if she could see me now XD

Thank you, I really apreciate it =D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poppyizzie1

when they say do you ? are they referring to a singular person or group of persons it could mean both.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buiosu

If I'm not wrong "hablas...?" is singular "do you". yo hablo; tú hablas; él/ella habla; nosotros hablamos; vosotros habláis; ellos/ellas hablan.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Why would you say "¿Hablas español? rather than "Habla usted español?" It seems to me that if you are on familiar terms with someone then you would know what language he or she speaks, so it is more likely to be asking this of a stranger, with whom you should use the formal version.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Well, it doesn't like that. Supouse you have an aunt you don't see since a year. Then, she come to your house and say something in Spanish, you can ask she "¡Ey! ¿Hablas español?" And you haven't to speak to her in formal way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Good example. Although, I thought that with elder family members like tíos y tías o abuelos y abeulos o padres, you should always use the usted form. no?

However, I only just recently began speaking with a native speaker in Spain and he even said that they basically only use usted for older people. He gave a couple of other examples where you would use usted but not many and he said even in those situations you could/would quickly switch over to the tú forms. Which is different from what we're constantly told on here lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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In early 1900, use the "usted" form with your parents where common. But, it's not that usual now. You can say "usted" to an aunt, if she is like a stanger for you or it's the first time you see her.

In some countries, people is still using "usted" to elder family but, in general, it is only used to speak to an elder people or adults you don't know, and almost never with children or teens ("almost", because there are some places where is used this form. I can't say exactly where now), 'cause using "usted" is a way to create a barrier between you and the other person, or cut the bonds (for example, when you broke up with a couple and you are mad with this person, you could use the "usted" form and call this person by the lastname [that's very depressing :( I hate when people do this to his couples]).

It's a respecting thing, more than another thing: you use it to people you don't know to shows them respect. But if you use it with a family member you show no love, affection or care for the other person, then maybe they get mad with you. The "usted" form have diferent meaning if you use it with your family or with a stranger.

Even in this situations when you don't know the other person, you can use the "tú" form with a stranger, but it's like you brake the barrier. For example, it's common a 75 years old man speak to you in "tú" form meanwhile you speak in "usted" form to him, and some days later you speak in "tú" form with him.

You can allways use "usted" with a professor and it will be right. You should use "usted" with a boss to show him respect. You can use "usted" with a neighbor even if he/she is little than you, but it's rarely if you use it with a 25 or less years old person. You can use "usted" with a married person or a person who have childrens, but you can use "tú" too.

Do you want another example? XD

Oh, you have writed "abuelos y abeulos" and it's "abuelos y abuelas".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Hey! Excellente! That really explained the various scenarios and general usage rather well.

Muchas gracias por los ejemplos!

Here, tienes un lingot!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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You're welcome!! =D I'm so glad it were useful for you =)

And thank you so much for the lingot too =P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/umaer.fast

How do i know it will be 'you speak' it seems first time 'speak'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Umaer.fast, you can tell that it is "you" speak by the verb form. I speak is "hablo," he speaks is "habla". Here is a web site that might help you learn all the forms of the Spanish verbs: http://www.conjugation.org

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FirstnameL4

Hablas espanol? I didnt see tu anywhere

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

FirstnameL4, tu is the pronoun inherent in hablas and is so for ALL 2nd person verb conjugations

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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It is included in the verb, like allways

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/potato1337

Isn't it supposed to be "hablos" because it's supposed to be yo form?!?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

potato1337, unfortunately, there's NO such word as "hablos". the yo form would be "hablo". but the subject here is "tu", i.e., "hablas"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheaRichar

I don't understand this app..... It's not teaching me. ... It's treating me all the time. ......I don't get it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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The Duolingo "tips" can help a lot. But it is very beneficial to go other websites or books to understand the grammar details that are not explained in Duolingo. Otherwise, you are just learning from trial and error and memorization, like you learned your first language when you were a baby. Most likely, no one told you the grammar rules until you were at least 8 years old, by which time you were far more fluent than we are at the end of Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RomaniaSut

Lol, they should make something to just have a code to type the special letters on the keyboard for lazier people :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I typed the following in a Google search bar" "How to type Spanish letters with an English keyboard", Several good sources were listed that explain how to do this. It's different depending on your device (iPhone, Blackberry, Mac, PC, etc.) but there are explanations for all devices. On some devices, you can hold the key down for a couple of seconds, and then the alternate forms appear and you can choose. For example, hold down the "u" key, and you see option for ü, û, ú and others. So just search the Internet for information about your device.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

There are unicode characters that you can type in using alt combos.

i.e. alt+0225 = á, alt+0233 = é, etc..

If you are using google chrome there is an extension that you can download called AccentsPlus that lets you type a letter and then hit ctrl or alt and it will change the letter. Por ejemplo, if you type the letter u and hit ctrl it gives you a ú but if you hit the alt key it gives you a ü

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Have that in PC, are you in a phone?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Yumi.V - I use Apple products and I find the same works on iPhone, iPad, and the Mac laptop computer. But if you are using Windows, it will be different. And I have no knowledge of Android phones. That is why I suggest an Internet search to find the method that works for your device.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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I just said that to RomaniaSut, because in my PC are allways a little special letters keyboard near the text box but not in my phone, but there I can press the letters and the other letters with accent appears, I guess it's like apple products then.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviathanTheGirl

How do you know when to add "you"? Is it just by context?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

LeviathanTheGirl, yes, often in context, but also the verb ending will specify "you", e.g., "as" will mean tu, tu hablas means you speak but so does hablas. the ending "a" can mean you but also he, she or it, e.g., habla, so in this case the pronoun is necessary unless you know in context that "you" is the subject. the same with the ending "an"/hablan, it can mean they or you/ustedes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviathanTheGirl

Thank you so much!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dorbartal

People cuold some here help me with the actual quest here? How could i know that the transeletion here is "do you" speak spanish? Its seemd to be just Speak spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

If it's written it'll obviously have the question mark, otherwise, you have to listen to the intonation (the rising of the voice) at the end. Like English, questions in Spanish, specifically when not beginning with a definite "interrogative" or "question word" or phrase such as qué, cuándo, por qué, dónde, cuántos, etc.. require the voice to rise at the end. Questions don't necessarily rise at the end when they begin with an interrogative though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/averrryyyyyy

Where does the "Do" come from in the Spanish words?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

averrryyyyyy, the "do" is inherent in verbs. with hablas there are THREE possible translations:1. you speak, 2. you are speaking, and 3. you "do" speak. see "501 spanish verbs" p.xviii, present indicative

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mexclass

Your grading is always commenting on my NOT applying the proper accentuations....... however, it is not that I forget them;
It is because IF I DO HAVE the capabilities included on my android phone 'options' (and I have attempted various possibilities)..... I am not aware of how to apply them. Sorry. ; (

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

mexclass, when you type a letter and want to include an accent, try holding down the key and a box will pop up which will allow you to choose the accent you want

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angelina_bayrak2

why doesnt "speak spanish?" work?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Because that's not what it means.

I mean, for one thing, you wouldn't say that in English. It actually sounds kind of rude because if you think about it, you'd have to nod at the person to indicate you're talking to them. Also the dismissal of a pronoun when asking a question can seem quite offensive to some people in English.

Anyway, a more technical answer is the fact that the question says "hablas" which is the 2nd person conjugation of hablar. 2nd person is the tú form and tú means "you". So, since hablas is the 2nd person conjugation of hablar, hablas can ONLY mean "you speak" or "do you speak?"

Hablas = you speak ¿Hablas? = do you speak?

Understand a bit better now?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cookie_neyney

Why does it say DO you speak english like where did the DO come from

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

do, as an auxiliary verb, does not exist in Spanish. In questions, the "do" is implied by the verb. escribes(you write) becomes "do you write?" when posed as a question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Cau

Would it be "hablos espanol" if you were asking a male?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Nope. Hablar is the verb "to speak" and it only changes form depending on the tense (past, present, future) or subject (I/Me, you, him, her, it, they, etc..). It doesn't change based on gender.

I had the same question early on lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/denfel

I got this wrong because I used "¿Hablas Español?" with a capital letter Is it normal?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Languages are not capitalized in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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In Spanish, from what I have learned, it is español, not Español. However, in German, all nouns are capitalized. In both languages, Duo will count it wrong or at least give you a message, if your capitalization is incorrect. My recommendation is to learn to write correctly, which includes the rules of punctuation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilach123

Don't they have grammer in spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Yes, they do have grammar. And for that reason, "hablar" takes its second person singular indicative ending and precedes the object of the sentence. Also owed to grammar, is the pitch rise found at the end of such a question, indicated in writing by "¿?".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

can someone explain why one will be hablas the other hablo? I get the whole feminine & masculine thing but why is Español feminine? o_O

I mean, the word sounds kind of manly to me.

Go ahead... say it. Español! see? Strong like bull... lol.

Seriously though, I get that hablo in Yo hablo Español is the conjugation for Hablar with the Yo pronoun. So, since you're asking "do YOU speak Spanish?" wouldn't hablar conjugate to hable or hables? (the conjugation for usted and tú respectively)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/approximant

The ending of the verb doesn't say anything about the object's gender. “hablas” simply indicates that it's 2nd person singular. For some words, it's slightly different depending on whether it's an “-ar” (like “hablar”), “-er” or “-ir” conjugation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

I just came back here after a while. Thank you for your explanation. Up until the point I had asked this question, all the verbs we had learned to conjugate were basically -er verbs (comer, beber, etc..) and the ones that were -ar (cocinar for example) had only been used in the Yo pronoun example, which is the same conjugation for -ar as it is in -er. I have since reached the lesson using -ar verbs, so now I understand.

Thank you for the answers :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ava816

When you say "I speak Spanish" it would be hablo. If you said "You speak spanish" it would be hablas. If you said "She/he/it speaks spanish" it would be habla, and if you said "They speak spanish" it would be hablan

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

Hucklebeary, "español" IS masculine!!!!!!! hablar for usted is habla and for tu is hablas. it's an "ar" verb and the present tense conjugation endings will start with "a" except i which ends in "o"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

yes, this has all been cleared up for some time now lol...

my additional reply (right above you) I stated that I had not yet encountered any conjugations past the yo form of -ar verbs and therefore did not understand that it was a different conjugation ending for different forms of verbs. I also was on like, day 2 of my education and was confused as to verbs getting genders changed or not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damitjanet

I have the same question. Hable or hables? Those seem to fit for tu or usted.

And how do you use accented syllables in the comment area?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Damitjanet, You can type accents using alt-codes. Make sure your number lock is on for your keypad. Hold down the alt key whilst typing 160 on your keypad.This should give you: á

alt + 160 = á
alt + 161 = í
alt + 162 = ó
alt + 163 = ú
alt + 164 = ñ
alt + 130 = é
alt + 129 = ü (as in pingüino)
alt + 168 = ¿
alt + 173 = ¡

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Yesterday I discovered that if you press AltGr+4 and then press n, the n changes to ñ... and I speak Spanish xD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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On Windows 8(should work for xp, vista and 7), you can go to Control Panel>Clock, Language, and Region>Language, then you should be able to add a Spanish keyboard from there.

4 years ago