"Ní thaitníonn sé go mór leo."

Translation:They do not like it very much.

4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/matanov
matanov
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Another verb for "like" O.o

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephaflop
Stephaflop
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I thought that meant "to enjoy"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It does, kinda. It's more accurately translated as 'to please', thus 'taithníonn sé liom' = 'It pleases me' or 'I like/enjoy it'.

If you know Spanish, it's a lot like the verb 'gustar' in that language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielC.To1

se - they?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie-Clai133496

Sé means "it", leo means with "them". Word for word, it does not please very much with them. =They do not like it very much.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seamus747
Seamus747
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Have we learned this construction on Duolingo already? I have no memory of it... and so lost a heart!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984
Bush6984
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So glad they got rid of that heart system, and now just go up and down/back and forth. SOOO much better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seamus747
Seamus747
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Both much and very much are given as dictionary hints yet I lost a heart for much on its own.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/envythenight
envythenight
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was 'much' the top suggestion? if not, i find it's always safest to go with the suggestion at the top, it's rarely led me astray

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seamus747
Seamus747
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I don't remember which was on top. But only "very much" was accepted as a correct answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlueWillow991967

I am confused about word order. How do I know it's them not liking him instead of him not liking them? Would the other be, "Ni thaitnionn siad go mor leis"? Is the clue to the construction which pronoun gets the "le"? (please pardon the missing fadas)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Yes to both.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ARoisin

Well, that's what do I still seem to get wrong, likewise: to 'enjoy'= it is 'pleasing to me'= is 'reflexive' expressed in the 'passive form'. so the Subject is at the and.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Ní thaitníonn sé go mór leo is literally "Not pleases it greatly to/with them". Making it more like English it becomes "It does not please them greatly". This can be more loosely stated as "They do not like it very much".

The subject in the Irish sentence is (it).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grf1426
grf1426
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What for does this be wrong:- "they do not like it a lot"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3
clairelanc3
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I don't understand why "ni thaitnionn sé"is translated as "they" don't like" . Shouldn't it be rather " ni thaitnionn siad"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Shouldn't it be rather " ni thaitnionn siad"?

No! Remember that the word order in Irish is not the same as in English.
For simple sentences the order is: Verb, then subject, then object.
In English it is: Subject, then verb, then object.

So here the verb is: Ní thaitníonn (= not pleases)
The subject is: (= it)
The object is: leo (= to/with them)
Go mór qualifies the verb and tells us how much of the 'not pleasing' is involved.

As a first attempt at translating we can put it in the Subject, verb, object, order and say "It is not pleasing greatly to them".

Then we express this idea in the more usual form: "They do not like it very much".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3
clairelanc3
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I don't understand : "ni thaitníonn sé" means "HE DOESN'T like" I think not THEY DON 'T like...and "leo " means "them" so why is the correction THEY DON'DON'T LIKE HIM VERY MUCH?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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"ni thaitníonn sé" means "HE DOESN'T like"

No! it does not mean that.
To say "He doesn't like it" in Irish you have to express it as "It is not pleasing to him".

Here the object of the English sentence becomes the subject of the Irish sentence. So the that you see doesn't mean "he"; it means "it".

  • Ní thaitníonn siad leis = they are not pleasing to him, i.e. he doesn't like them.
  • Ní thaitníonn sé leo = he/it is not pleasing to them, i.e. they don't like him/it.
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bredacm

Isn't "se' he or it, and isn't "siad" they? Why is "He does not enjoy it very much" accepted here?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Please read my comment above.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neil704602
Neil704602
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I put. . They don't like it a lot. Is that wrong???

1 month ago
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