"Is buachaill amaideach é."

Translation:He is a silly boy.

4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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And one of the typical ways we refer to people being an idiot in both Irish and English in Ireland is to describe them as an 'amadán'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphalyrae
alphalyrae
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Can it be used both affectionately and in genuine annoyance in Irish as in English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Well, just as with any pejorative, it depends on the context!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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I lived in Ireland my whole life and I've never heard anyone say amadán :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Well, that says more about your background than it does the prevalence of the term. Dubliner, I'm guessing?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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Well, Co. Louth-er actually :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Close enough: that puts you in the Pale, so Irish was dead for centuries where you're from. If you go further out into the country, you'll here more terms from Irish causally used in conversation in English. Your background means you're significantly less likely to have heard words such as 'amadán' in daily use amongst English speakers than if you'd been brought up in, say, Monaghan.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I think time might be at least as relevant as geography - this Dubliner is quite familiar with amadán, but I imagine that I'm at least a generation older than DeograciasM.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LFCmisha
LFCmisha
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I'm from Drogheda my self, but me ma is a Dub and would have said amadán to me a lot, especially her parents. I can tell you that the accusations were groundless

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucytuohy

If "amadán" is an idiot, Surely "amaideach" is idiotic, nach ea ?\(〇_o)/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

This could be useful...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCunado

I typed 'silly' for amaideach in this case but would/should foolish also be considered acceptable too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
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I typed "foolish" and it was accepted. So yes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

As Captain Mainwaring would say !!! except stupid instead of silly

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

My thoughts exactly (as a Brit)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeinkerry

How would "The boy is silly" translate?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"Tá an buachaill amaideach"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeinkerry

Does "Tá sé buachaill amaideach" make any kind of sense?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

No. When you are linking a noun (buachaill) with a pronoun (é) you must use the copula - "Is buachaill amaideach é"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeinkerry

I'm beginning to grasp the copula. In English it's harder to distinguish it from a verb.

1 year ago
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