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"La profesora explica el problema."

Translation:The professor explains the problem.

1
3 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

Input from people like rspreng, rewm and many others, make this 'duolingo' program worth its weight in gold! I have learned SO much from the comments posted in response to these sentences! (and also had a couple of great laughs!) thanks to all of you!

58
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwezomePozzum

Yes! You are so right! Rocko2012 is another person that helps a lot of people too

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

But Duolingo doesn't weigh anything...

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bethandelin

I totally agree!!

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobSteen

I appreciate the help of others but honestly I think if Duo was a complete learning platform it would explain the grammar itself. I am getting towards the end of the course and I will finish it but I will certainly then go elsewhere to look for a better one.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_Guy

Why in the name of all that is holy is problema masculine?

35
Reply33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

words of Greek origin, and some others of foreign origin, that end in -ma are masculine: problema, idioma, tema, programa, mapa, clima, di'a, sofa' just gotta learn 'em

101
Reply93 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewm
Rewm
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to expand on that, -ma words are neuter in Greek, when they crossed over to Latin they remained neuter, but then neuter was merged into masculine gender in Romance languages

50
Reply33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siroggak
Siroggak
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As I learned Latin a bit, your comment was even more informative, than that of rspreng. Thank you)

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob_R

DL marked "explains the issue" as wrong. Does it always have to be a "problem"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

Probably not. But contextually, doesn't problem seem like a better answer?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

Does 'explicar el problema' mean 'explain what the problem is' or 'explain the answer to the problem'? I'm assuming the latter because it's the professor doing it, but you never know with professors...

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/popa910
popa910
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While it's ambiguous, as @Johngt44 says, you could translate 'explain what the problem is' as 'explica que es el problema'. Hope that helps

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Explica lo que es el problema". Otherwise you're just explaining that it is a problem.

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Doesn't really matter for translation exercise as the same ambiguity exists in the English doesnt it (as your question neatly exemplified!)

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pantstheterrible

Does profesor/a refer only to a teacher at college/university level with a doctorate as it does in America, or can it refer to any teacher like in french?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dakota_Marz

I am pretty sure that i saw someone post somewhere that "Maestro/a" = "Teacher in elementery" and "Profesor/a" is "any other teacher".

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/popa910
popa910
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I second @Dakot_Marz's answer. To clarify it a bit, based on my experience with 3+ years of high school Spanish and 2 years of college Spanish, I would say that "maestro/a" could be used interchangeably (although it may be a bit disrespectful to a college professor), but I don't think I would call a high school or elementary teacher "profesor/a" (unless they happened to have a Ph. D. and insist on being addressed as such). But this is just the impression I get, I'm not an expert in this.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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¿ Hay unos hispanohablantes que pueden respuesta eso por favor ?

I guess it's a product of working in academics, but to me there is a huge difference between the English terms "school-teacher", "high-school-teacher", "lecturer" and "professor".

"Teacher" is usually interchangeable for either of the first two of those. In the US, the latter two appear to me to be fairly interchangeable, but in the UK "lecturer" and "professor" are not equivalent. Only a small number of "lecturers" are "professors".

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ramona921063

I just came here to say...,"Hi!" Yo nomas bine a decir...,"Hola!"

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RandomCanadian12
RandomCanadian12
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oh my god. "no problemo" is a lie!

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Odinson33

Really? 'El' problema? Male-female?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

Problema, esquema, dilema, sistema, and other similar words came into Spanish from Greek, where they are neuter (as opposed to masculine or feminine). For whatever reasons, these words "act" like masculine words so they receive the masculine article. There are not that many of them. If you speak English, they're pretty easy to pick out. You just have to remember them.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FidelValenzuela

"Explicates" is another translation for "explica." It's easier to remember since they sound the same.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Explicate' does help to remember the meaning, but you also have to remember that this would be so rarely used in English that it would not be understood by most people.

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Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/francim37

the teacher explains the problemm

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/francim37

hte professor explain the problem

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'The professor explains the problem.' You have to add 's' for 'he/she/it'.

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Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/francim37

the class is a very very nice

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aug707
Aug707
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Does "el problema" mean a crisis type of problem, or a study related problem like a math question?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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ambas cosas.

That is, both. In this case, it is likely a maths/ physics/ econ etc. problem, set for homework or a tutorial, say.

Note that it needn't be a 'crisis' for "problema" to be appropriate. "¿ Cual es el problema ?" is a common enough way to ask someone "what's wrong?"

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Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norbertjhe

In romanian is very similar: Profesoara explica problema

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sgtROCK1

this is completely unrelated, but I work with a lot of hispanics; I've noticed that they use the word "we" quite a bit. I've also heard it in a lot of spanish-spoken movies. It sounds like "way" when they say it. Like they'll say "donde Jose we" or "si, we". what does the "we" mean or how do you use it? I desperately want to learn to talk with my coworkers as many of them are not able to express themselves in english.

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Reply6 months ago