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  5. "Itheann ár ngaolta ag an bpó…

"Itheann ár ngaolta ag an bpósadh."

Translation:Our relatives eat at the wedding.

September 11, 2014

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mungome

And that's the only reason they came.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

agus ólann siad fíon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarperMacDonald

. . . Agus beoir, agus uisce beatha, agus coinneac, agus . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnastasiaStyIes

...agus anraith gan salann ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnastasiaStyIes

Let us take a moment to appreciate that this would be an awesome sentence for (say, a machine) translator to screw up and use English word order rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

Or a human... Oops. Good chuckle though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greenlass

I must be getting too sleepy to continue. I wrote "We eat our relatives at the bog." Hope I don't have nightmares.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesCaulfield1

Whoa, that ng sound is not easy for me! Especially followed by a funky dipthong. Yeesh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Codester3

I don’t hear well, so I got my daughter to listen to the “ng” with me. Neither of us could figure out what sound it made.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvYgf0

We eat our relatives at the wedding


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arancaytar

Nearly mistranslated this one as "I eat our relatives at the wedding"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teahealswounds

I got this sentence just after getting that dreaded other sentence where they only accept "bainis" even though they haven't taught us that. Raging


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmClassPlanet

Why isn't "ag" translated "at"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EavanM

It looks as though it is. Am I missing something? ("Itheann ár ngaolta ag an bpósadh." Translation: Our relatives eat at the wedding.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niall304641

Nothing beats relatives at the weddings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rinimac

Why is "our relations eat at the wedding" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat132133

You have translated it correctly but the question is looking for the answer as gaeilge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TArdy44

Is the same word used for "wedding" and "marriage" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Bainis is more specifically the wedding, pósadh closer to "marriage", but, as in English, there is some degree of overlap.

This is discussed in some other exercises:
Na póstaí
Ithimid ag an bpósadh
"At the wedding"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacey773203

Learn to sing "sí do mhamhaoi" ( spelling) and you'll get it in your mouth. Learning to sing along in Irish with my favorites really helps out phrases in my mouth and helps me remember certain things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greenlass

I agree with your suggestion, Stacey773203. This was actually my motivation to learn Irish -- so I could sing along with the Irish songs I listen to. I've done this with French and Spanish as well and it's really helped to improve my pronunciation and accent in those languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p8c

for irish, consider songs sung by aoife ni fhearraigh. they are all irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColmDuffy

Ya, so I used pósadh in the previous one, accepted it was incorrect, but then I get this. I realise there are more than a single word for a situation, but this is just confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacey773203

Don't sweat it. In a few months it will be old hat. Just plug away and practice EVERY DAY so you're always building and having insights into how the language works. If you persist long enough you will learn this language. Many others have done it.. little Irish children speak it fluently. We can do this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChromateX

Would "I eat with my relatives at the wedding" be "Ithim le mo ghaolta ag an bpósadh"?


[deactivated user]

    Is the speaker saying "wheel-ta" for "ngaolta"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.g.doyle

    I'm not quite catching the pronunciation of "ár ngaolta". It almost sounds like the first consonant is pronounced like an English "w".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    The "w" that you think you're hearing is there in gaolta. The ng is pronounced before that, but it's a bit fast to hear in this case. It is slightly clearer in Tá breitheamh i ngach cúirt


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xoVanessax

    Why is "Our relatives are eatting at the wedding" wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    Irish and English both differentiate between the simple present (Itheann ár ngaolta - "Our relatives eat") and the present progressive/present continuous (Tá ár ngaolta ag ithe - "Our relatives are eating").

    Not all languages make the same distinction, but they are not interchangeable in Irish or in English .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HupSkup

    Should our loved ones not also be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    No, it should not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate612119

    Can gaolta mean 'family' i.e. immediate and extended family together, or in that case would muintir be better? Or would I say something like "gaolta agus clánn"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    gaolta are the people that I share a gaol with.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate612119

    Thanks! So, clann, teaghlach and muintir are more restrictive, and gaolta is more general? My clann/teaghlach/muintir would all be gaolta, but not vice versa?

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