"Cheese."

Translation:Cáis.

4 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ArmadilloShoe

It looks like it comes from the same word as German "Käse" and Spanish "queso" (and English "cheese"), it's fascinating :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It looks like they do all come from Latin, which is directly from PIE. You can even see a cognate in Sanskrit, if you look at the English etymology for "cheese" on Wiktionary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArmadilloShoe

Yes! The longer Latin expression for cheese is actually "caseum formaticum", certain languages retained the first word and other languages retained the second word (French "fromage", Italian "formaggio"). It's very cool.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukasleibfried

What's even more fascinating about this is that we can use it to determine how far back speakers of Indo-European languages knew how to make cheese. This is because we know roughly at which point in time certain languages diverged, meaning we can literally determine how old a word and in many cases the object or concept described is by examining how many languages contain similar words for the same concept.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lana_la_gata

This thread just blew my mind a bit. Go raibh maith agat!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Welsh: Caws. Dutch: Kaas.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pgcasp
pgcasp
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With the capitalisation it seems to give away the answer. This happens in other courses or one verb and several nouns or vice versa.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RH1234
RH1234
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why is it capitalized?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

It is evidently of extreme importance that we get CHEESE down to a science. I've had five examples in a row in this lesson on this word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/extralittle

The word feels like a simplified version of latin/germanic/early english words and it is very cool.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleJohn456110

Should the "s" not be pronounced "sh" (for it follows a slender consonant (i) ??

7 months ago
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