"Buíagusdearg."

Translation:Yellow and red.

4 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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Interestingly, "buí" is cognate, through PIE word *badyo- ("yellow, brown"), to Latin "badius", whence also words for horse color like English "bay", French "bai", Italian "baio". Also, "dearg" comes from PIE *dʰerg- ("to dim, to darken"), which gave English "dark" or Tocharian A "tärkär", which means "cloud". God, etymology is SO GREAT!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KaramataBG
KaramataBG
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This reconstruction of 'bui' seems a little cheesy to me. In principle, Celtic languages have lost their initial b / sounds, and moreover the Italo-Celtic branch of PIE is known to have transformed (in some dialects) the labio-velar / gʷʰ to pure labials. Furthermore, pure b in Proto-Indo-European was very rear, thus, I won't dismiss the possibility of "buí" / "badius" coming from a proto-root with instead of b.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's the generally accepted reconstruction. Sometimes also given as badios in Mallory's Encylopedia (badyo- coming from American Heritage Dictionary, badios coming from Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch; not sure which is considered more reliable. I would lean towards the latter). But, it's worth noting, that the word is only attested in Latin and Irish, so it could be a loan word into Italo-Celtic.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeDiver1

I've no idea what you said.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRichardson2

I don't know how the Proto-Indo-European word for darken came to mean 'red' in Irish. The only thing I can think of is that as the Sun darkens, it turns red, and so that's how the colour red became synonymous with darkening. Anyway, what's important is that that's how I remember that 'dearg' means 'red'. I think of the English word 'dark' first, and from there I get to 'dearg' relatively easily.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glavanec
Glavanec
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English 'black' < PIE *bʰleg- also comes from a semantic root opposite of its present meaning (it meant 'shining, flame, burning'), so this should not surprise you. Note that 'dark' may also mean 'obscure, dull', which is easier to relate with 'red'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MADasALICE
MADasALICE
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I know how I'm going to remember this. "Buí" sounds vaguely like brie. Brie is a cheese. Most cheese is yellow. And "dearg" sorta has a "r-egg" sound at the end. Done.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juniper_Jaye

Also "dearg" (without the "g") is "read" backwards. That could help too. :3

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evaluna93
Evaluna93
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It sounds like 'dearg' is pronounced like it has three syllables, and I was wondering why.. Is 'rg' alsways pronounced with a vowel-like sound in between?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Yes. It's a feature of Irish phonology that extends to all words. I think it goes as follows: a schwa-like vowel is inserted into every pair of constants that has one r, l, m, or n. Corrections welcome.

(This also affects Hibero-English, which is why Irish people say things like "fillum" for film and "Dubbelin" for Dublin)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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You’d probably meant “consonants” rather than “constants”.

The fifty-cent word for the insertion of that vowel is “anaptyxis”, and a summary of when it happens in Irish (in IPA terms) can be found here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AustinARR

Is "dearg" and "rua" interchangeable?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Not really. Rua is used more in terms of red hair than anything else. Dearg is used more as the adjective. You can see the difference between rua and dearg.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mediterranean

The d should sound more like "dj" in this audio, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

In Donegal, yes. I'm not sure about Munster, but I can say this isn't correct for Connacht.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

"Dj" is correct for Ulster, Donegal being in Ulster...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yeah. Stupid little typo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AustinARR

Maith thú, GRMA

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FionaOnDuoL
FionaOnDuoL
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I would use dearg for brighter reds, say, red paint. And rua for red fur.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/auspiciouscat

Thanks Fate/Zero for letting me get this one right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TellTheSeal
TellTheSeal
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This was the very first exercise I encountered in the "Colors Skill" section, and I couldn't help being amused that I had already learned these two particular color words just from watching so many hurling games broadcast in Irish.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leyla-Mich

Gryffindor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gia758609

Yay! :-P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SolSD
SolSD
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Is this a reference to Ulster flag? It has a little white, but it's mostly yellow and red, and would make sense since the Irish tricolour is mentioned too

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

No, it's just two colours. The only common shorthand for the Ulster flag that I'm aware of would be a reference to the Red Hand.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gallifrey900

Buí should mean blue.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gallifrey900

It just sounds the same. I like things to be simple like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Like when the CIA tried to fix the Greek referendum so that the majority would vote OK instead of Nay, but they got the meanings backwards and rigged the wrong outcome.

3 years ago
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