"Spiser du et helt brød?"

Translation:Are you eating a whole loaf of bread?

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
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This sentence would not be possible sentence in the dialects of American English with which I am familiar. Without a unit, either "loaf" or "slice," bread is dealt with as something that is not countable. Thus, one might say "a whole slice of bread" or "a whole loaf of bread" (or a whole roll, muffin, biscuit, etc.), but one would no more say "a whole bread" than "a whole sugar" or "a whole milk," which, of course, mean other things.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reisam
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Wow, I never realized that! Thanks! I guess English is quite unique in this regard?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
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It seems to be something peculiar to the way we talk about bread, too, since I can ask "Have you eaten the whole cake?" or "Have you eaten the whole pie?" It is only with bread that I have to ask "Have you eaten all the bread?" in the same way I would ask whether you had drunk all the milk.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runem
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It has now been corrected :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
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Of course, I still would have gotten it wrong. I thought it might be a way of saying what we call "whole wheat" bread--brown wheat bread, as opposed to white.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
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And is the other kind just brød, or can you specify hvidbrød or hvidt brød or something?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runem
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We call that grovbrød, or alternatively groft brød, meaning coarse bread :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeniusJack
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You might find this interesting.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanClare1

I told I had a typo, but the typo was that I wrote "a whole" instead of "an whole." I am a native English speaker, and I double checked elsewhere and "a whole" is correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chromexus

I did not see anything that would be Danish for loaf so I left it out, even though as the other commenter pointed out, the phrase would never be used that way in english. But if it IS used that way in Danish, we should know. IF it can be loaf or slice, either implied, in my opinion there are too many variables here to make it a meaningful test question.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidDonal4
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Above would be my English translation, not Do you eat a whole bread?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidDonal4
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Did you eat the whole bread? is not good English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whowhatwhere

Should it not also accept: "are you eating a whole bread loaf?" While it sounds slightly more awkward, I believe it to be as grammatically correct

2 months ago
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