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  5. "Loro attraversano un cortileā€¦

"Loro attraversano un cortile grande."

Translation:They cross a large courtyard.

June 1, 2013

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbomba

Why not "a grand courtyard"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaKnic

That would be "un grande cortile." Generally, grande in front makes it great (as in impressive), grande behind makes it big/large (referring to its size).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meowww11

Thank you. That helps immensely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shafali09

Does anyone else hear 'una' instead of 'un' in the slowly spoken version? I reportetd it.. but is it just me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

It is a systemic bug (not just this one sentence) .. Always una on slow playback. I've reported it on something like 20 different questions, I have been reporting it for about 5 months. July 2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noell52

Yes, I definitely heard "una!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katakis1

Huge should be synonymous with big/large


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris123456

An interesting discussion about this (as well as a few diversionary points) can be found here: http://duolingo.com/#/comment/118590


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwarven_hydra

Aye, I remember once my sister was all like, "I can't believe in Spanish, there's a word for big, huge, AND large!" My response was, of course, "Schwester.....So does English."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahankr

Should "lawn" also be accepted for "cortile?" Or is there another word for "lawn?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

I don't know the translation of lawn however as I understand things from othe discussions "un cortile" is not a garden or lawn but a paved area like a courtyard, there may be some plants but it's mostly paving or concrete


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meowww11

I'm not an expert, but I believe that in Italy, as in much of Europe, a lawn is commonly known as a garden, so it would be "giardino. "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phil521387

I put a great courtyard. Seems OK to me. DL doesn't agree though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EleanorMiller

What is wrong with DUO tonight? I can't get through an exercise because parts of the pages are missing or incomplete i.e. there are no options given for fill in the blanks and the keyboard option is missing and the bottom of some pages is cut off where words can't be accessed. This is happening in Portuguese and Italian. I'm not even going to try any others- too frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucia613945

same question and not permitted to type in answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucia613945

I am having the same problem as Eleanor Miller. Help


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EleanorMiller

Hi Lucia- I know, very frustrating. I have had to abandon exercises when I can't complete the series. I think Duo needs a trouble report that details which exercises are involved and includes a screenshot of the page in question. I don't even know how to do that. Also they do not promise a response after you submit the report. I am finding the entire site to be buggy now with dead spots and missing stuff and doubled up images/words. I'm not sure I can be bothered to continue which is a shame because when it is working Duo is pretty great.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bosseconway

What's a courtyard?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meowww11

It's like a patio area, or what many cultures might call a garden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/voosten.a

It would generally be enclosed on three sides in some way (by walls of a building or a fence)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucia613945

I cannot enter the answer. There is no selection. Please check out. Lucille


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

"Grand" Would Mean "Large" In This Context, Would It Not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaKnic

When "grande" comes before the noun it modifies, it means "awesome/amazing".

When "grande" comes after the noun it modifies, it means "big/large" (in physical size).

I've noticed that when adjectives are placed before the object they modify, they are generally a subjective description of the object, whereas an adjective following the object refers to its physical characteristics.

"Un grande libro" = "a great book." That's purely subjective; one person may love the book while another hates it.

"Un libro grande" = "a big book." This is a truth describing the physical characteristics of the book.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meowww11

Wonderful explanation. Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/voosten.a

Why does Duo rarely offer ehat seems to be the most direct translation. Wouldn't attraversano mean traverse? Surely both words would be derived from the same latin roots?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meowww11

Yes it does mean traverse, as well as other synonyms of the word. I believe DL's purpose, though, is to teach us common conversational language. In America, you would rarely, if ever, hear someone say "traversed" in every day conversation. In my learning, I always look for those common roots to help me discern the meaning of a word, and then translate it to what I would actually say in the real world. If DL marked it wrong, I would still report it, but I agree that it would not be the preferred word choice.

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