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  5. "Chonaic mé réamhaisnéis na h…

"Chonaic réamhaisnéis na haimsire ar an Aoine."

Translation:I saw the weather forecast on Friday.

September 11, 2014

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Since this sentence is referring to a particular Friday, is ar an Aoine an equivalent substitute for Dé hAoine? I had thought that ar an Aoine would have been preferred for a generic Friday, i.e. “on a Friday” rather than “on Friday”, despite the an.

EDIT: It is an equivalent substitute. The NEID gives an example of ar an Aoine referring to a particular Friday in the past:

the airlift of troops took place on Friday tharla aeraistriú na dtrúpaí ar an Aoine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

Thank you. I was wondering the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnfry7

This sentence no longer appears in the NEID. Now the dictionary uses “ar an Aoine” only as a translation of “on/on a Friday(s)”. “On Friday” is “Dé hAoine”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

The NEID entry for "forecast" includes this entry:
"the forecast is bad for Monday" - táthar ag tuar drochaimsire ar an Luan

presumably referring to a specific Monday rather than Mondays generally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenStorch

Where i come from weather report and weather forecast are interchangeable. Is that not the case here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neal356674

Same question. I'm assuming this is another case where DL doesn't have both listed as acceptable answers. I'd report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

The prefix réamh explicitly makes this a forecast, rather than a report. faisnéis na haimsire is "the weather report".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joanmvanore

Thanks-- knowing what the prefixes etc mean is a HUGE help in remembering the vocabulary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AraSigyrn

Shouldn't 'réamhaisnéis na haimsire' have an 'an' before it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prony-dH-Bray

The first noun does not need to be defined with an article "an" because it is already defined by the defined genitive "na haimsire".

Hata cait = a cat's hat (both undefined) An hata cait = the cat hat, as in the kind of hat a cat would wear (only the hat is defined) Hata an chait = the hat of the cat (both defined, so no need for a defining article at the start ...) Hata don chat = a hat of the cat (only the cat is defined)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Irish nouns phrases can only have on definite article, and in this case the na covers that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait235765

why is this correct and not i saw a weather forecast on the friday


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

As the other comments mention, the na in a genitive phrase like réamhaisnéis na haimsire makes the whole phrase definite.

"a weather forecast" is just réamhaisnéis aimsire.

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