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"An imíonn tú? Cathain?"

Translation:Do you leave? When?

4 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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Translating it directly as "Do you leave?" doesn't strike as proper English. In English wouldn't it be more correct to say "Are you leaving?" The only time you would use "Do you leave" is when the sentence is proceeded with a question. So, could you translate this as "Are you leaving?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No, you couldn't. Irish, like English, uses different forms for the present continuous and the present progressive (in fact, some even argue this is where English got their form from, though the evidence is by no means definitive). So "are you leaving" would be An bhfuil tú ag fágáil or An bhfuil tú ag imeacht with the latter meaning something more like "are you going away"?

NOTE:

If you don't have a direct object, use imigh. If you do, use fág.

So, D'imigh mé aréir - I left last night - but D'fhág mé do pháiste ag an bpáirc - I left your child at the park.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roh1990
roh1990
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This seems like kind of a problem with Duo generally. Quite often it wants very literal translations (often of fragments) even if that results in something you'd never say.

I don't know what the Irish is conveying here, but it's not going to be "Do you leave?", because that's just strange. You wouldn't use the present simple like this in English – it needs an adverbial phrase. "Do you leave on Tuesday?" or "When do you leave?" or similar. And in this context, the present progressive in English actually has the same meaning as the present simple.

Does it look strange in Irish? If so, that's a problem in itself. If not, then sensible, if not entirely grammatically parallel translations ought to be acceptable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes, it looks strange in Irish. Irish among natives, despite what grammars will tell you, doesn't have the simple present (except for a few verbs of sense/feeling, etc.). Instead, it's habitual present. This questions means "Do you habitually leave? When?" Which is even weirder.

Sadly, I have no clue why they decided to teach the present tense, apart from that's how it's done in other courses.

Also, something I've learned, Fág is generally only used with an object, whereas Imigh is used without one. So, if you left the night before, you could say D'imigh mé but not D'fhág mé.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

I'm guessing the reason that they start with this construction is because they think it's the simplest to learn, and they'll teach different constructions later that are closer to naturalistic Irish. This isn't meant to he a phrasebook of useful sentences, it's a grammar primer.

People learning new verbs in English learn the simple present, which is also mostly used to express habitual actions (except when it expresses future intentions, or narratives in the past...): if they're trying to learn the word "leave", then yeah, they'll start with "I leave, he/she/it leaves", and never mind that it's not a verb that often gets used that way.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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Excellent. Thanks very much for the clarification. I appreciate the insight.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

"The plays are always boring. I look forward to the intervals." "Do you leave?" ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianDuffy3
BrianDuffy3
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The root of the verb is imigh, which is to go. Fág is to leave.

An bhfuil tú ag fágáil? Is, are you leaving?

An bhfuil tú ag imeacht? Is, are you going?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DBoil4
DBoil4
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I think a better way for Duolingo to have presented this would have been to add something like "ar maidin gach lá" at the end of the question. Then the translation would sound more natural : "Do you leave in the morning every day?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginagillen
ginagillen
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I put "when do you leave" I thought it made more sense, but it was not accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It makes more sense, certainly, but it's not an accurate translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fergal28

another meaning for imigh is to go but it said that my answer was incorrect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrBrns_

Im just here wondering what is wrong with pól...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Searlasmane

Are you going? When? wasn't accepted, weirdly. Ag teacht agus ag imeacht - coming and going…

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nat000frog

What is the difference between Cathain and nuair?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mark62413
mark62413
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Cathain is a question, like When are you going home? Nuair is a conjunction, like I go home when I have no money. I'm a bit late answering this but I hope this still helps.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rev._mother

But another alternative to Cathain is cen uair

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

Can't wait!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
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Is this speaker new? I have my sound up fully, but can barely hear her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The recording is new; I don’t know how new the speaker is. ;*)

Yes, this particular recording is extraordinarily quiet for me as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
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I've been reporting all the quiet recordings. Their inbox must be pretty full. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The past skill-and-a-half have all had recordings at (for me) barely perceptible levels. Since some of them were repeats that had previously been audible (if at a somewhat lowish volume), I’m wondering if this is browser-related, or Duolingo-related.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
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I'm just getting to these recordings for the first time. The badly pronounced voice is still painfully loud, but doesn't appear often. The others were whisper quiet yesterday but a little better today. I think they must be working on it. I'm an eternal optimist, though.

2 years ago