"De vaders zijn aan het koken voor de kinderen."

Translation:The fathers are cooking for the children.

4 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rvdonk
rvdonk
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'de vaders koken voor de kinderen'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RubenFGDS
RubenFGDS
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= "The fathers cook for the children", different than "are cooking"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernie18814

How would you say "The fathers are cooking in front of the children"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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De vaders zijn in aanwezigheid van de kinderen aan het koken.

of

De vaders zijn aan het koken in aanwezigheid van de kinderen.

in aanwezigheid van -- in the presence of

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernie18814

Thanks, but I'm not looking for in the presence of, I'm trying to understand how the sentence will be structured to distinguish between "voor"=for and "voor"=in front of

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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I'm still trying to figure out exactly what you're asking, but here's another attempt:

When translating from Dutch to English De vaders zijn aan het koken voor de kinderen., the English translation can, technically, be rendered as either:

  • "The fathers are cooking for the children."

  • "The fathers are cooking in front of the children."

The first sentence (especially without any additional context) is likely what is being conveyed.

If you're translating from English to Dutch -- using in aanwezigheid van could help distinguish the meaning.

Using voor to construct a sentence that exclusively means "The fathers are cooking in front of (but not for) the children." in English requires some more context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernie18814

This is exactly what I was looking for: When translating from Dutch to English De vaders zijn aan het koken voor de kinderen., the English translation can, technically, be rendered as either:

"The fathers are cooking for the children."

"The fathers are cooking in front of the children."

I translated my answer as the second one, and it was marked incorrectly. I am Afrikaans and we have two separate translations for "for" and "in front of": Die pa's kook vir die kinders vs. Die pa's kook voor die kinders. Hence my confusion :)

Thanks for the persistence!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernie18814

We also have "Die pa's kook in die aanwesigheid van die kinders" but that does not necessarily mean in front of

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
PaulineStinson
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If you want to make sure people know you mean "in front of" in this sentence (it COULD mean that, but it's not the first thing that springs to mind), you could say "De vaders zijn aan het koken voor de neus van de kinderen" (lit. in front of their nose)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacoAckerm
JacoAckerm
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Is "aan't" an acceptable contraction of "aan het" in Dutch? E.g. "aan't koken" instead of "aan het koken".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No, generally contractions are rarely acceptable in Dutch, especially when writing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
PaulineStinson
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Contractions are used in writing, but mostly in poems or songs to create a better flow or rhythm. And, of course, to reflect conversations. If you'd want to use a contraction in writing, you need to put a space in between the words: "aan 't", not "aan't".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppydust
puppydust
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I'm confused. In another question in this section the correct answer is: "Wij zijn naar huis aan het lopen."

Howcome in this question we don't have: "De vaders zijn voor de kinderen aan het koken"? i.e. howcome the present-continuous part of the sentence go to the end like in the other?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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The position of a prepositional phrase (like "voor de kinderen") is flexible in Dutch. It can come either before or after the infinitive part ("aan het koken").

6 months ago
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