"Hun tager i skole til fods."

Translation:She goes to school by foot.

September 14, 2014

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paschalisb

I think it should be "She goes to school ON foot"

September 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod

    Yes, both are correct, but I've added "on foot" now, too

    September 14, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insti2

    "by foot" is not correct English where I come from.

    If I was trying to express the sentiment of this sentence I'd say: "She walks to school"

    May 25, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
    Mod

      That is also accepted as an answer

      May 25, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigWillyLad

      yeah well hey buddy unfortunately the English of England, the purest form of English, has 'by foot' so stfu

      March 11, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OleSuhr

      Aaarrgh! This is so incredible! If we assume that we start with the sentence "She walks to school." , then how do we wind up with a sentence that has been screwed up to a point where it is no longer correct English? The correct danish would be "Hun går i skole." or "Hun går hen til skolen." May I suggest that Duolingo makes a serious revision of the exercises they use so that these nonsense sentences are replaced with correct usable sentences that actually help the students to get a better grasp of the language they are studying? Please !!

      April 22, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
      • 1469

      Are you a native danish speaker? Is the danish sentence "Hun tager i skole til fods" wrong?

      April 22, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OleSuhr

      Yes, I am. I can't say that it is wrong as such, but I think that if you use the term that Duolingo uses in Denmark, people would know that you are a foreigner. This is the case with a lot of the exercises in Duolingo, they focus more on the direct translation than the correct spoken language.

      April 22, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rkvance5

      Tage vs. gå just gets me. I'm sure I'll catch on eventually, though!

      January 30, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
      • 1469

      From Wiktionary: Foot: 3. (uncountable, often used attributively) Travel by walking.
      Example use:
      - We went there by foot because we could not afford a taxi.
      - There is a lot of foot traffic on this street.
      https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/foot

      March 22, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrijAndrusiak

      How come 'tager' means 'goes' and not 'takes'???

      April 22, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
      Mod

        "Tage" can be used when you're going somewhere. For example: "Jeg tager hjem nu, vi ses!" = "I'm going home now, see you!". "Take" doesn't work like this in English

        April 22, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
        • 1469

        "I'm taking myself home." ?

        June 8, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
        Mod

          I actually didn't think of this one, though it doesn't work in this sentence (at least it sounds really unnatural to me), it does work in the example you've given. Though I also think it sounds a bit unnatural when accompanied by a mode of transport, but it doesn't necessarily sound wrong (I would say "I'm going home by train tonight" over "I'm taking myself home by train tonight" or "I'm going to school on foot" over "I'm taking myself to school on foot"). Whether that's because the Danish has warped what makes sense to me in English or not, I'm not sure though

          June 9, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insti2

          I'm taking a trip.

          June 8, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insti2

          I'm taking the bus.

          June 9, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
          Mod

            However here it's being used differently, where you have a direct object, as opposed to a direction alone (one can of course say "I'm taking the bus home" or "I'm taking a trip to Spain" but this still has the direct object). I wasn't trying to say "Take isn't used to talk about moving from one place to another" but that "take can't be used with only a direction or location", for example, you can't say "I'm taking to school by train" ("Jeg tager i skole med toget") but you can say "I'm taking the train to school"

            June 9, 2015

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insti2

            Thanks for the clarification.

            June 9, 2015

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrijAndrusiak

            that's unusual

            April 22, 2015

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam_Waddington

            'she goes by foot to school' would this also be correct?

            October 19, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoralWarde

            I know of no version of English where "by foot" is correct. Only "on foot" is.

            March 22, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PushythePirate1

            by foot or on foot would be fine, though it would be more common to say 'she walks to school' (US English)

            January 1, 2019

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigWillyLad

            then you don't know English

            March 22, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magda835502

            I tried it left and right but I really can't distinguish 'fods' the way it's pronounced here sigh Any tips or tricks that can help to get it?

            February 9, 2019

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ycUvuSap

            Distinguish 'fods' from what?

            June 7, 2019

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilHutchi2

            'by foot' is just wrong in English

            December 16, 2017

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PushythePirate1

            By foot or on foot is fine.

            January 1, 2019

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigWillyLad

            no it isn't at all. Are you a native English speaker?

            March 22, 2018
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