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"Él se fue hace un rato."

Translation:He left a while ago.

5 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

As Xtempore mentioned "se fue" comes from irse. I didn't think of it like that but I looked it up in my dictionary and yes I discover it isn't 'fue/went" . This was an eyeopener because I tend to forget that reflexive verbs actually are listed independent in the dictionaries I assume because they often mean something different than the root verb e.g. Ir. Very interesting aspect.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dghkudcbn

Can someone explain how hace un rato means a while ago, atleast in this situation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cgthayer

"Hace un rato" I think of "ago a little" or "since a little (time)". For rato it's like raton (mouse) or a ration (a small portion)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letter_s
letter_s
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Why not "He went away a little while ago" (irse usually is to go away, or am I wrong).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Take what I say with a grain of salt. Ir not 'irse' is what we would use for 'went'. The other thing I notice is if I drop "a little=poco" your sentence says "he went away while ago" which doesn't work. So is it a matter that you would need to add 'poco'. I'm guessing and just pointing out my observations.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/senned
senned
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I understand that Duolingo is trying to teach me new words from time to time, but it's quite frustrating when those words have multiple meaning and it goes 'HAHA, we were looking for the meaning you didn't learn yet!'.

I mean... what the hell is 'ir'? This sentence clearly translates as 'He was him since a while'. Doesn't make a whole lot of sense, but that's how you taught me, Duolingo!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronaldo623

ir = to go irse = to leave fue = went se fue = left

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stinkstonk

I didn't have a clue what the sentence said. I looked it up on Bing Translate and they gave me "the left makes a rat". Oh well, another of those lessons I shall have to carry on carrying on. I wish the specific lesson dictionary would reappear, that would be so helpful when a lesson like this came up

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pelaaja_X

This sentence is far too difficult for an introduction for the past tense....

And in my opinion the perfect tense should be introduced before this because it is more common and easier than the past tense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lyrasito

Why not "he went awhile ago"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Technically "went" is a form of the verb "to go" which in Spanish is "ir". However here the form used is "se fue" which is a form of "irse", which means "to leave". The correct translation of "se fue" is "left" not "went".

The distinction may be subtle, but it is important that you understand that "ir" and "irse" are not the same thing, just as in English "to go" is not the same as "to leave".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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so why was that translation (to leave) not in the hover?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Because for the most part Duolingo only shows the meaning of an individual word, so if you hover over "fue" it shows "was/were/went" because those are the meanings of "fue". But "se fue" means "left".

You should not think of Duolingo as an all-inclusive Spanish language resource. It isn't. It's good for testing your Spanish knowledge, and for building vocabulary, but to really learn Spanish you need to use other resources (e.g. SpanishDict.com, LomasTV.com, spanish.about.com, studyspanish.com, or any good Spanish-language course).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Do you recommend Lomas TV ? Is it beneficial at this stage of learning Spanish? I have been considering it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Try it and see. There are a number of free samples you can try. There are other sites that are good for learning vocabulary and grammar, but in terms of really being able to listen to and understand native speakers, I haven't found a better resource.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Most helpful. I couldn't figure out how one would translate irse. Thanks for telling us it's TO LEAVE.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

Because "Awhile" means something different to "A while".

You could say that someone has been gone awhile, or gone for a while, but never gone for awhile.

...I found this to help explain what I am struggling to: http://www.dailywritingtips.com/a-while-vs-awhile/

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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Actually "awhile" is OK here. And now accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

That doesn't mean it's right, it just means someone at DL thought that it should accept when they read the report, maybe as a spelling mistake. I'm still fairly certain that it is wrong, although I would like someone who knows for certain to comment.

It looked wrong to me, and when I read up on it, it seemed wrong too. On the link I added above it says "Awhile always means “for a while”", if this is true, which I think it is, then I would say that you would never say "He went 'for a while' ago", you would say "He has been gone 'for a while'", so "He has been gone awhile" would be OK but I just think that "He went awhile ago" is simply wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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I agree with you, but this distinction is too difficult for many native English speakers, let alone learners of English, so DL is correct in allowing this expression.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lised65

As I understand it, in this usage, they are basically interchangeable; it's just that a "while" is a length of time, and needs to be accompanied by a preposition ("for a while" or " a while ago"), but "awhile" basically encompasses the three word phrase "for a while" in one word. That's the simplest way to think about the difference. No, "a while" does not mean the same thing as "awhile", but "for a while" does, and since that is the usage we are talking about here, they do mean the same thing. You just need to correctly word it. You could correctly say "I will be gone for a while", or "I will be gone awhile", (or "he left a while ago") but not "I will be gone for awhile" (see clawedinvader's reference above)

  • sometimes DL is not rejecting the words you use, but the correct usage of them.
  • all dingisbroot said is that awhile was accepted, they did not note whether or not they used a preposition around it, so as far as we know, there's no reason that DL should have had a problem with it. You may both be right.
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myuval
myuval
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i answered "he went a little while ago" and it was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skittlzz
skittlzz
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Why not "he left for a while"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

I wrote: "he went out a while ago" and it was marked wrong. What would the Spanish have been for my offer?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

To go out (and also to exit) = "salir".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaPoot
AnnaPoot
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I wrote "he went a short while ago" - short was crossed out - their translation was "he went a shirt while ago" - ha, ha - have noted the error

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeslieFielding

I agree withPeleaja, - much too difficult for a starter. I didn't know what to make of it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superflyafrochic

why not the verb "salir"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

"salir" means "to exit" or "to go out", whereas "irse" means "to leave".

"Él se fue hace un rato" = "He left a while ago".

"Él salió hace un rato" = "He went out a while ago".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keirdre
keirdre
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"He went towards a rat"...I think I got very confused here!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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That's "Él fue hacia una rata." :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keirdre
keirdre
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Thanks! It was the hace / hacia that set me down the wrong path, hehe.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Yeah, that's really confusing at first!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

It is that kind of sentence☺

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marushka6
marushka6
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Made me laugh! Thanks for sharing:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christianm3373

I wrote "He went a short while ago" and it was considered wrong. Don't get that at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaspar.k
kaspar.k
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"He just left?" Duolingo does not accept it, but is it really wrong? As "un rato" is a very small period of time...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DashaLavrenova
DashaLavrenova
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I wrote "He went AWAY SOME TIME ago", and it wasn't accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Perhaps because "went away" has stronger connotations that "left".

I think your sentence would be "El se fue lejos hace un rato".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DashaLavrenova
DashaLavrenova
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But SOME TIME was also crossed out. Isn't it correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

"Some time" is probably a reasonable translation of "un rato" (although "a while" is definitely better).

DL generally has several different correct answers that it accepts. If your answer doesn't match one exactly it is considered wrong, and DL compares it to the one it considers the closest match. It then highlights the differences as errors.

For example if they accept (1) "He went a while ago", and they also accept (2) "He left some time ago", then...

If DL matches against (1) then the difference is "away some time", which is then considered wrong.

If DL matches against (2) then the difference would be "went away", and it would highlight that as wrong.

That's just the nature of the algorithm that DL uses to try to highlight errors. It's generally very good, but as you have experienced, if you make ANY mistake, it will sometimes show things as being errors that are not.

As a rule you need to try to stay as close as possible to the original sentence, making minimal adjustments to accommodate the differences between English and Spanish.

Hope that helps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DashaLavrenova
DashaLavrenova
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Thank you very much for your advice!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaNieL_SaM

repasad el audio de esta oración porque está mal, y no digáis que no porque soy español y lo entiendo muy requete bien.

Corregid el audio.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crtrahan

I knew it was probably wrong, but I answered "He did a little", because I thought 'hacer' is 'to do' and 'hace' is 'does'. It doesn't seem to fit here.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kap10squeakRZ

I thought it said he was a rat...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

rato = while, hace = (idomatically) ago. hace un rato—"a while ago" similar to "hace dos años" (two years ago). If I'm wrong let me know. I'll delete the comment.

1 week ago