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  5. "Ich ließ sie im Ausland."

"Ich ließ sie im Ausland."

Translation:I left them abroad.

June 3, 2013

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langston

I don't think I like either proffered solution. "I left them overseas" does not seem correct, because "Ausland" does not cannote a passage over water. Nor does "I left them in the foreign country" seem quite right, because "the" indicates that some particular country has been specified. "I left them abroad" seems best to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jalnt

"I left them abroad" was accepted for me. I think "overseas" must be the preferred solution because it's more common than "abroad", here in Australia at least. But maybe that doesn't apply everywhere because, well, to get anywhere from Australia you need to go overseas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimothyGeek

"Overseas" is a synonym for "abroad". "Across an ocean" is only one of the possible definitions of "overseas." https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/overseas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rainbowrebellion

Not really, overseas is a synonym for abroad only for countries surrounded by water. Very common in the UK, to them everything is over the seas. In mainland Europe country we would use overseas to denote a place further than just one sea away, it is often used to refer to the American continents. Abroad, on the other hand, is anywhere outside your country, whether divided by a sea or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathso2

Then there are countries (like my own) in which overseas = abroad, so we use both interchangeably even though they have different meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

"I left them abroad." is a correct translation, but the English is awkward. The German is literally "I left them in the foreign country." The English sentence would sound more natural if it also had the preposition "in." For example, "I left them in France." But we can't do that, because the country wasn't specified.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lull0000

Hello. Is there any difference in pronunciation between "lies" and "ließ"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

One s sounds like a z. Two s's sounds like an s. Lies would be pronounced "leez" and ließ would be pronounced like "lease".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agrarian.lockup

... although, sometimes an s at the end of a word is still pronounced like an s Trotz des schlechtes Wetters - despite the bad weather - the letters on the last three words are pronounced like an "s" still


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sninguistics

Probably better to say that final 's' sounds like 'z' ([z]) only after a long vowel (lies/dies vs das/des). Although with Haus being pronounced with a normal s-sound ([s]), I don't know how diphthongs like au would figure into that rule...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

Also the ß character sounds like an s. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

I believe it is called "ein scharfes S"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

Which is the two letters s + z.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DouglasWin1

Ließ is the past tense of verlassen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

No, of "lassen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margusoja

But "lassen" is not "to leave" ?!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

Oh, I just answered the question without considering why it was asked! Yes, "lassen" ist "to let". See the thread started by @nrshakya and answered by @as_p. Language is strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ebelebel

"abroad" and "overseas" are not the same word. Some countries have land borders.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

"im Ausland" has the meaning "somewhere other than this country": lit., "out-land". And "abroad" and "overseas" are synonyms when used in the sense of "foreign land", even when one does not literally have to go over a sea. If I have traveled from California to Mexico, I have "been abroad" and have "traveled overseas" even though I may have never crossed any water at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

"Abroad" is more general than "overseas." Hence, in the absence of context, it's a better translation of im Ausland.

Edit: zengator is mistaken. If you travel from California to Mexico, you cannot say in English that you have gone overseas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nrshakya

ließ is the past of "let" though isn't it, not of "left"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    See meaning number 2 of Pons' definition. Here, lassen can mean "to leave [something somewhere]". In English, the past of "leave" is "left".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mart337658

    I left her abroad.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCFal

    hab den gleiche Satz geschrieben


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fredrik814103

    'I left her abroad' works fine and it makes perhaps more sense? Or is it just as strange?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alpski

    Isnt it them Sie and she sie?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

    Nein. With a capital, "Sie" is the formal/polite "you". Without an initial capital, "sie" means "them", "they", "her" or "she".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/syonara123

    I chose "I left her abroad", and it was declined as incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.tsuku

    could you use any of the ihr forms here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qaxsdert

    Judging by the correct answer, I suppose the verb "lassen" is an accusative verb (for which we shoudl not use "ihr" but "sie"). But then, why couldn't the answer be "I left her" besides from "I left them"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tujja

    For me the answer they gave was “ I left it abroad“. ???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoubleLingot

    Ich habe es im Ausland gelassen.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/williamleo2

    What is this 'im' doing with the whole sentence?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      It forms part of im Ausland, which means "abroad" (literally: "in the foreign country").


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikanokoi

      Why can't it be "i let her abroad"? Is this bad English?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narion_k

      That's right: it doesn't make sense in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

      Yeah, I think nikanokoi meant "i left her abroad." And that's a valid translation (although "i" should be capitalized). But you're absolutely right, narion_k: "i let her abroad" is nonsensical.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert717083

      I would think that sie could be HER, rather than THEM, so it would be ( I left her abroad ).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

      Genau. In the Akkusativ, "sie" can be either "her" or "them". In Nominativ, it would be either "she" or "they".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

      'I left them in Australia' ??

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