"Ele fala comigo, no entanto, não fala com ela."

Translation:He talks to me, however, does not talk to her.

June 3, 2013

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Richard556716

The English is grammatically wrong. One possibility is "He talks to me; however, he does not talk to her." You need to at least put "he" before "does."

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ericin617

I'm not sure that's is any correct way to use "however" in this sentence. The most natural way for me to say it would be, "He talks to me but not to her.".

September 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ericin617

Sorry. Typo. I'm not sure >there is< any correct way...

September 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Platospicantes

It's not the way I'd say it, but I don't think it's that bad.

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/richard2403

In answer to your other near simultaneous post, Paulenrique is clearly identified as a moderator by the blue MOD symbol. I have not previously noticed the green ring but I assure you that on my screen, there is NO word “moderator” identifying Danielconcasco as a moderator.

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/alerer

Why can't I translate "no entanto" as therefore?

June 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

"No entanto" shows contrasting ideas (like however, but, though,...). Therefore explains something, shows the results, consequences of something. (In Portuguese: por essa razão, por isso, consequentemente,...)

June 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Kelk

English translation is wrong – it is missing the subject of the second clause. "He talks to me, however, HE does not talk to her."

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/richard2403

As is clear from several comments, this sentence does not sound correct to native English speakers. The reason, is that “however” is essentially an adverb not a conjunction, as most but not all dictionaries make clear. More specifically, you should not use “however” as a conjunction when you intend it to be a synonym for “but”.

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco

It sounds correct to this native speaker. Did it occur to you that it might be a dialectic difference?

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/richard2403

Well you seem to be in a minority of one on this thread at the moment. In any event you might like to take a look at this (already posted below)

https://www.writing-skills.com/using-however

As a matter of interest, what is a “dialectical difference”?

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco

A dialectic difference is a difference due to the dialect. An example is:

I already ate.

In American English, this sentence is fine and has a different meaning than "I have already eaten". In British English, that first sentence is considered an error and only the present perfect would be used.

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/richard2403

Ok thanks for that. So in simple English “a difference of dialect”. Unfortunately, in my dictionary “dialectical” has a different and more complex meaning. I think that the word you are looking for is “dialectal”.

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco

Yes, I don't know why I kept typing dialectical instead of dialectic. Fixed.

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/richard2403

This is an excellent exposition of the correct English usage of “however”. In my view, it clearly follows from this that “He talks to me, however, does not talk to her” is grammatically incorrect.

https://www.writing-skills.com/using-however

April 4, 2019
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