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"Ella tiene buen humor."

Translation:She has a good humor.

5 years ago

125 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ggofthejungle

duolingo is wrong here. Humor is an uncountable noun in English, so you cannot say "a humor"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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Perhaps they were referring to one of the four humors. Perhaps her black bile level is superb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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She is in a good mood. = accepted (good mood = buen humor) This translation is more natural than Duolingo's awkward official answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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Would that not be "Es de buen humor"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodwomon

Same question! What's the difference between 'de buen humor' and 'tener buen humor'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
DABurnside
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"She is in a good mood" not accepted 05/09/18. Also "She has a good humor" sounds peculiar to me. I'd say, She's humorous or funny or has a good sense of humor, but not the DL wording.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelle596621

Exactly my thoughts. Duo's response put me in a mal humor.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daphne177862

That's what I used as well, and it was accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attanatta
attanatta
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+1

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiriamdaSi8

This answer was rejected just now, did they change it?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Curt391905

No longer accepted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/czeis
czeis
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She is in a good mood was not accepted 7/12/18

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

She is in a good mood was marked wrong 2018-08-26. Maybe this is a ser/estar thing?

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
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Marked wrong 9/14/18.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patlar

This should read 'she's good humoured' or 'she's in good humour (preposition IN is needed here)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

It's fortunate I am in a good humour, otherwise I might argue with that comment.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottann

Once again DL is literal (it's about Spanish and not English, but I often share your frustration.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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"it's about Spanish and not English" - My thoughts exactly. So many people get caught up focusing on how the expression is said in English (word order, idioms, etc) rather than learning the Spanish expression. I think it's easier to learn to think in Spanish (ie, speak Spanish) by simply accepting the differences and learning the literal translation. But that's just me. The debate will never go away.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikypsyche
spikypsyche
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It's about Spanish and not English, sure, but translating "She has a good humor" results in me not knowing what the heck they're talking about.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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You can never know the context with only one sentence. They might be referring to a favorable combination of the Four Temperaments ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_temperaments ). Or maybe it's short for "a good sense of humor".

Either way, for me at this early stage of learning a language, I find it a waste of time to worry about little things like this. At this point I am using DuoLingo just to get a general grasp of the language. In the future when I find myself in a conversation where a sentence like this comes up, then I will ask them to please explain what they mean. For now the little things don't matter. That's how I see it. To each his own.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

Have to disagree since it's also a translation site. A big part of the objective of the site is to produce accurate translations. So we need to report to DL when they use incorrect literal translations and mistranslate idioms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grimalkins
Grimalkins
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It is important to report sentences that are unacceptable in English such as "she has a good humour". Duolingo often recycles sentences, so it is likely that Spanish learners of English will be obliged to translate "ella tiene buen humor" like this. Duo accepted "she is in a good mood". My Maria Moliner dictionary gives one meaning of "humor" as "sentido de humor", so I think "she has a good sense of humour" should also be acceptable. Probably this was what the Duo translator who wrote "She has a good humour" was trying to say.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MercedesNu5

Thats not always true with duolingo, I often find myself losing points when I got an on point Spanish translation, but incorrect English grammar (because I'd translate it literally)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I agree with you that learning to phrase a thought as native speakers do is the right thing to do. That's why I thought this sentence should be translated as "She has a good nature." See my opus later in this thread. By the way, this translation was marked incorrect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaleyDawn626

That is because to learn the proper use of a phrase, one needs to know what it means which in this case is to know it's meaning in english (since it isn't using an example, but mere translation for teaching). So it should indeed show the proper translation. Literal translation is not always the correct usage.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0
7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shougo_Kawada
Shougo_Kawada
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It should be "She has a good sense of humour".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teo_Valdes
Teo_Valdes
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I'm not sure that's actually what it means. I'm pretty sure that would be "Tiene un buen sentido de humor."

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Humor" is a quality, and thus considered uncountable, but the word has more than one definition. Three from an online dictionary, with examples: 1) characteristic or habitual disposition or bent: temperament <She has a good humor/She has a good temperament> 2) an often temporary state of mind imposed especially by circumstances <She is in a good humor/She is in a good mood> 3) a sudden, unpredictable, or unreasoning inclination : whim <I will and I must get married for the humor is on me now." (lyric of an Irish ballad)>

Searching online, I quickly found three published examples of "humor" used as a countable noun. EX1: There is nothing that puts a man in a good humor so quickly as laughing at his jokes – from "Bikey the Skicycle and Other Tales of Jimmieboy" by John Kendrick Bangs. EX2: Dick is all very well when he is in a good humor, but time and dressmaking wait for no man – from "Not Like Other Girls" by Rosa N. Carey. EX3: From my father I have inherited that most worthy of bequests–a cheerful temper. And who was my father? Well, that really has nothing to do with a good humor – from "Et godt Humeur" by Hans Christian Anderson as translated by Jean Hersholt.

This online definition makes my point: "In English grammar, countable nouns are individual people, animals, places, THINGS, or IDEAS that can be counted. Uncountable nouns are not individual objects, so they cannot be counted." (In the paragraph one examples, the determiners "an" and "the" are used, and in English, these determiners/articles indicate number, with "a" and "an" being used for singular only and "the" being used for singular or plural.) Notice that ideas and things (which are intangibles such as qualities) are listed as "countable."

"Indefinite" is the term for the English grammar concept that, IMO, is the closest to the "uncountable" concept used in Spanish. Where these concepts differ is that English is less rigid about indefinite numbers because the quantity may be unknown but is not necessarily unknowable. For example, the word "some" is an indefinite pronoun in English and is used when the exact number is unknown. So I might describe a handful of grapes like this: "He has some grapes in his hands." What this means is that I don't know how many grapes, but I do know that there are SOME. I can also be fairly sure that the number is finite and I definitely would be able to ascertain it if I had the opportunity.

Sorry for writing a book here, but each language's distinctions should be respected. "Countables" are an underpinning of the Spanish language, but not of English. The issue with this sentence is not whether "humor" is countable or not, the issue is that the sentence itself is not at all colloquial and a native speaker would not use or be satisfied with it unless more detail was added. Trying to comprehend English as a language that has strict rules about countables is as foolish as trying to translate Spanish to English without ever using the apostrophe + s. English does have uncountable nouns but the main thing to remember is that they are used with singular verbs and usually have no plural form. This is in contrast to English indefinite pronouns, which can be used with singular OR plural verbs, depending on the meaning the writer/speaker wants to convey.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Claire083

Thanks, Linda for your info. I loved the Irish balad reference, particularly after getting married to my Irish beau earlier this year.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You're welcome, & congrats on your nuptials. When I wrote that comment, I couldn't think of any examples of English "uncountables." Since then, I've come to a better understanding of English "uncountables." See: http://www.fluentu.com/blog/spanish/definite-and-indefinite-articles-in-spanish/ See: http://www.gingersoftware.com/content/grammar-rules/nouns/collective-nouns/

For instance, one of the classic definitions of "noun" is "a person, place, or thing." After we grasp that definition, we are taught that "things" are "tangibles" (physical items) and "intangibles" (nonphysical things like abstractions, "concepts/ideas, and values.) These intangibles usually take a singular verb: Mathematics (math) is my favorite subject. My thoughts were varied. My freedom is very important to me.

The sentence "Mathematics (math) is my favorite subject," is not as straightforward as the the other two because the subject, "mathematics" is a collective noun that has a plural form but a singular meaning. Because of that singular meaning, the word "mathematics" takes a singular predicate. Other nouns that work the same way: physics, economics. In the poem "Flower in the Crannied Wall" by Alfred Lord Tennyson, there is even an example of an English compound direct object that is plural in form (God and man) but singular/collective in meaning:

Flower in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower—but if I could understand What you are, root and all, all in all, I should know what GOD AND MAN IS.

Flor en la pared fructuada, Yo te arranco de las grietas, Te sostengo aquí, la raíz y todo, en mi mano, Pequeña flor, pero si pudiera entender Lo que eres, la raíz y todo, todo y todo, Debo saber lo que ES DIOS Y EL HOMBRE.

Translation courtesy of Google Translate and me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

All of that shared research PLUS a poem in two languages! Have a lingot!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliciaLenn1

They aren't necessarily wrong; they're just using an archaic definition of "humor," which used to be mood. DL might be technically right, but it's frustrating seeing forms of words that aren't used anymore.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It's not an archaic definition.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjjacob
rjjacob
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May be she has an ice cream bar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Words sometimes have a different use and meaning as countable or uncountable nouns: "have no humour / have not much humour / have a good (sense of) humour / be in a good or bad humour, etc.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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I think "good sense of humor" should be accepted. Unless we are talking about the ice cream novelties.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottann

There is a difference between having a sense of humor and being in a good mood. A humorist will be in a bad mood on an off day and still keep a sense of humor.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SFJuan

I agree. The two most natural english conversational translations seem to be 'She has a good sense of humor' and 'She is in a good mood.'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zytiko
zytiko
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I just put a good sense of humor and it worked now

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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She is in a good mood. (accepted)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linburnlane

Sadly, it looks like Duo has since changed its stance on that. I just got it wrong (21 Apr 2018)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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She has a delicious frozen treat?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tedpal
tedpal
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Definitely agree that "humor" isn't a count noun. Furthermore, a more literal translation of an English idiom, "she is in good humor," should be acceptable

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

Why is the indefinite article required here, please?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Consider the case of the three pencils, one red and two blue, lying on a table, If I say, "Give me a pencil," you can hand me any one of the three. If I point to one of the pencils and say, "Give me the pencil," you will know which one I want because I specified by using the word "the." There is only one pencil that you can give me, and that is the one I specified by saying "the" and visually gesturing.

When you use the definite article "the," there is one and only one thing you are talking about. It is so ingrained for English speakers to think this way that they never stop to think about it, they just know to use "a" when there is a choice, and "the" when there isn't. So, English speakers automatically use "the" when they say, "Give me THE red pencil." They do this because you have no choice about which pencil you will hand them. They definitely told you that the pencil they want is the one and only red one. If the speaker doesn't care what color the pencil is, he will say, "Give me a pencil."

Similarly, it's the indefinite article because she may have many moods, and many of them may be good because of one reason or another. We just don't know which one of her possible good moods she is experiencing. Another way of thinking about it is that when you use the word "the" then you are talking about the one and only type of good mood that she could have.

Finally, it also has to do with number. You use the indefinite article because she is going to have many days when she is in a good mood, just as she may have many days when she is not. So, she is in a good mood today, and she will probably be in a good mood tomorrow.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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It's not, they must have fixed it 'cause I don't see it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andru1485
Andru1485
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She is good humoured, should be accepted. E.g. she has hunger = she is hungry.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rostellan
Rostellan
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I absolutely agree!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klpetrak

"She is in good humour" is definitely a correct interpretation of the Spanish sentence. Does anyone from Duolingo ever looks at our comments and make corrections? I very much doubt it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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They do sometimes look at comments and post replies. But the best way to add other translations or alert them to issues in a sentence is to use the " report a problem" feature.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klpetrak

Thanks. I have done that but all I get is a ticket number but no subsequent action (as yet, anyway).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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That sounds like the support link for technical issues? Report a problem can be found next to the tab where you click to post a comment. When you click on it a drop down menu appears with choices. After you select one you click on the submit tab. The menu will then close, but a message will appear that says "thanks for your report". This advice is for pc users, I'm not sure how the mobile version works

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klpetrak

Thanks. I'll follow your advice the next time I need to contact Duolingo with a report )::(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghostofthefuture
ghostofthefuture
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I heard "Ella tiene buen amor."

Maybe this means nothing, but the audio sounded like "amor," and not "humor." If someone else thought they heard "amor," please report it. If it's just me, I'll leave it unreported.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

The audio is fine. It says "humor". I'm a native Spanish speaker :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turgidtom

hmm, you could say "she has good humor" referring to humor as a collection of ideas and acts, same as saying of an athlete "he has good throws".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Milliarc

could you please describe the rules for "a/an", "the" and no article? When translating sentences from Spanish with uncountable nouns and no article, in English Duolingo translation any of three cases might be given, and it's very random!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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DL is inconsistent here. In one version of this sentence , the article is required; on the other, the article is omitted. Which is correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanAndrew

I kinda thought that the best translation would be "She is good-natured" but maybe that's more "Ella es de buen humor." So maybe "She's in a good mood"? Either way "She has good humor" is not something anyone would ever say.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenElias

She is good humour does not make any sense in English. She has a good humour is almost as meaningless. Should it be She is good humoured?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dowski22
Dowski22
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She has a good sense of humor, or She is in a good mood would be a better translation.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbfhagu0
dbfhagu0Plus
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I said: "She is in a good mood" humor means humor but it also means mood. Without further context, mood works well. It flows better than she a had good humor.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMcV1
CMcV1
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can any native spanish speaking person can say which of the meanings of "humor" 1st come to mind in this case: a sense of humor or a good mood

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Ella está de buen humor = She is in a good mood.

Ella tiene buen humor = She has good humor / She has a good sense of humor.

Ella tiene buen sentido del humor = She has a good sense of humor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Amigo, I wish they would hire you for a month or two to review the Spanish sentences for Duolingo. The algorithms need some human input.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Oh! Thank you. I'm flattered! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

Thanks...though in English "She has good humour" is not correct...though you could say "she is jolly"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Thanks, compicej! This is the best comment in this discussion. It totally clears things up for me. Have a lingot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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In another exercise, 'good mood' is said this way -- Hoy él está de buen humor. = today he is in a good mood

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phemsworth

Odd English translations are part of the strangeness of learning a foreign language by algorithm.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DEAZTURUEN
DEAZTURUEN
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"Ella tiene buen humor" even if DL demands a literary translation, it's wrong, because there is no indefinite article un/uno. Am I wrong, or is there a technical problem? I am just angry because of the live lost here...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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In Spanish we often skip indefinite articles with the verb tener. What I'm not so sure about is the English sentence, is the article really required?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mijiturka
mijiturka
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When do you use "tener buen humor" vs "estar de buen humor"? "She's in a good mood" is accepted here, while previously when I encountered "in a bad mood", "tener mal humor" was not accepted. Is this just something about the algorithm, or is it to do with good vs. bad?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Ella está de buen humor = She is in a good mood.

Ella tiene buen humor = She has good humor / She has a good sense of humor.

Ella tiene buen sentido del humor = She has a good sense of humor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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To me, tener buen humor is something more general, while estar de buen humor would mean one is in a good mood now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/350zavage

Can't 'buen' mean great in this context?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SFJuan

Grande/gran which typically means big, large, can mean great when coming before the noun. Ella tiene gran humor can mean She has a great sense of humor or She is in a great mood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ptoro
ptoro
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"She's good humored." should be accepted, no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwoWholeWorms
TwoWholeWorms
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¿Amarilla, negra, sangre, o flema? o.o

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crimpansee

I put, 'she is in good humour' but that was not right. Do they mean, 'she is good humoured' I'm confused by this one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axixic1

Ditto

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RositaLW

Absolutely terrible "correct" answers given here. BOTH of them. I've reported the problem. I used to teach English. I hope none of my students ever used either of those responses. She's good humor. XXXXX XXXX
She has a good humor XXXX

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chunkylefunga

'She's a good humour' shouldn't be a correct solution.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/curious63
curious63
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shouldn't it be ella tiene UN buen humor?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/curious63
curious63
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I wrote she has good mood - it did not say ELLA TIENE UN BUEN HUMOR!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desiree1965b

ice cream you scream.....we all scream

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegK.
OlegK.
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Duo is rhyming! I got the following two sentences in a row:

Él obtuvo mi amor.

Ella tiene buen humor.

Sounds like a happy couple!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/satwita
satwitaPlus
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Hmm. When I've heard this used by Mexicans (in context) it always seemed to mean something closer to "She is good-natured" or perhaps "easy going." Any Mexicans out there who want to correct me?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mrscrt
Mrscrt
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I agree . 'She's good humour' does not make sense in English. It should be 'she's good humoured'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DouglasDod10
DouglasDod10
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Improper English translation. It should say she has a good sense of humor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raydpratt

I wrote, "She has a good disposition." My translation was counted wrong, but my sense of the Spanish sentence is that it is describing a general quality or characteristic about the lady as a person, and not about her sense of humor. The older English meanings of the word 'humor' can refer to many more things than just being comical. My guess is that these older English meanings may still be current in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VickyKatz

Indeed "she has a good sence of humour" sounds better English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielCai623417

1000 day of my streak today and im almmost done with mY 12 language

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rostellan
Rostellan
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As several people have already said, 'She is good-humoured' should be accepted. Although, as was pointed out, we are learning Spanish rather than English, we need to have a reverse translation. So, if 'she is good-humoured' is not accepted, how, then, would you say that in Spanish?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/y0rkshire
y0rkshire
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Translations from Spanish into English do not get much worse than this, and yet I no longer have the opportunity to draw attention to such egregious English. "She is good humoured" is the only sensible rendering. However, I must, somehow, steel myself to reproduce the nonsense offered in order to finish the lesson. The translation offered to me is far worse than that given above.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juanet7

It should be " she has a good temperament" or "she is in a good mood" We would never say "She has a good humour"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ritzg_98
ritzg_98
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Wrong. No native speak of English would ever say that.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LobsangC
LobsangCPlus
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She is in good spirits. Porque no?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karen646472
karen646472
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I am confused. Does it mean she has a good sense of humour? Or is she in good humour/a good mood? She has a good humour is a nonsensical statement to me.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomimig

She has a good temper

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D.EstherNJ

She has ice cream.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Desroix
Desroix
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Much has been said about the bad English translation, but the original Spanish sentence "Ella tiene buen humor." doesn't seem to be common? I looked in dictionaries and googled the phrase, 'humor' only seems to be used with /tener/ for 'tener un sentido del humor' or 'tener humor para {algo}' All other examples seem to be used with /estar/.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delta5-4life

"SHE HAS GOOD HUMOR" IS CORRECT, NOT " SHE HAS A GOOD HUMOR"(THERE IS NO "A").....I HATE BEING DING 4 KNOWING MY LANGUAGE...THEY NEED 2 FIX THIS CRAP

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janet334410

When using the selected words version rather than typing the answer, I do not have the option to put 'She is in a good mood'

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alice48202

SO DId anyone tell Duolingo that what they probably mean to say , if not that she is in a good mood, is that she HAS A GOOD SENSE OF HUMOR. That would make sense to us.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaques743588

5/29/2018 "she has a good sense of humor" is accepted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bamburm

There is nothing wrong with "She is in a good mood". The Duolingo sentence is not good English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaleyDawn626

It should be a good sense of humor if it was going for the common english use of humor... Buen humor translates to a good mood.... So the translation "she has a good humor" is ridiculous.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dilipatience

I certainly agree with George. Humor is not a separate entity and cannot be slotted in a single unit. Duolingo mis stepped on this item.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrkChievous
FrkChievous
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I'm not a native English speaker, and I don't understand "she has a good humour". What does it mean???

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axixic1

It means she is in a good mood

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrkChievous
FrkChievous
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And is that a normal way of phrasing it in English?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debbos1
debbos1
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No!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axixic1

How about She's in a good mood?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SharonRaqu4

"She is in a good mood" needs to be accepted. That other option sounds quirky

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isabelwheeler

we know that "she has a good humor" isn't an accurate translation, since it doesn't make sense in English. I just wonder does "ella tiene buen humor" mean more like "she's good-natured" or more like "she's in a good mood." They're quite different.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SPanya4
SPanya4
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"She's in good humour" was not accepted. You used the wrong word. "She's a good humour" is apparently the 'correct' answer here. That's not even English! You can't have a humour

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynBel4

Correction is clutter?

2 years ago