"Ithim mo dhinnéar faoi dhó."

Translation:I eat my dinner twice.

4 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stephaflop
Stephaflop
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Eww!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Gross, I agree, but this sentence is a great illustration of the pronunciation of lenited D.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Not great, but it at least roughly demonstrates the difference between the broad and slender 'dh'. The broad 'dh' should be a voiced velar fricative (like 'ch', but voiced) but here is being mispronounced as a stop.

And don't get me started on how she consistently mispronounces 'dinnéar'...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlueWillow991967

Thank you. For those of us learners who aren't Irish, it helps when those of you who know more mention that something is a bad mispronunciation. I mean, I know by the rules of Irish spelling her pronunciation of dinnéar is wrong, but occasionally there's a word that the Irish just pronounce differently from the spelling. The only way we know the difference is when you guys comment on a glaring mispronunciation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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If you're referring to the sound of the vowel in the first syllable of 'dinnéar', I think that is the standard pronunciation in Munster; compare 'im', 'tinn' and 'An Rinn'. http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fuaim/tinn

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I'm not so sure.

I've looked through all the relevant voice samples, and 'tinn' appears to be the only one that shows that 'interpretation' of the vowel. While Munster Irish is sometimes a little 'odd' for owing to things like its realisation of palatal consonants and its stress patterns, which are quite different from the other dialects, I couldn't find a single example that fits that hypothesis, and the fact that she's putting stress on the initial syllable of 'dhinnéar' (DHINN-éar in dialects other than Munster Irish) rather than final syllable (dhi-NNÉAR in Munster Irish - the syllables are also analysed differently due to the differing stress patterns), also leaves me sceptical.

I wouldn't go generalising from one data point, though I'd have to talk to friends of mine who speak Munster Irish to be completely sure.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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I agree that one can't generalise. I'm just going from my experience of hearing friends of mine from Cork and Waterford who pronounce 'im' to rhyme with 'rhyme' (there is no audio for this in breis.foclóir, unfortunately), and the Gaeltacht of An Rinn in Co. Waterford is certainly pronounced like 'Rhine'. It took me a while to get used to these pronunciations, because my previous experience of Irish was based on the Connacht and Donegal dialects.

Other words in which the vowel sounds vary considerably from region to region are 'poll' and 'coill'. http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fuaim/poll http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fuaim/coill

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Oh, believe me, I'm fully aware of how much they vary! The pronunciation I picked up from my gaeilgeoir is half-way in between your typical Donegal and Connacht pronunciation (think Donegal without the clipping of ending and other quirks that can make Donegal Irish difficult to understand). When I went to college in Cork, I met plenty of people with the Kerry and Cork varieties of Munster Irish and their crazy moon language and got into some friendly arguments about the pronunciation of certain words. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vkigus
vkigus
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Am I a cow?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Rabbit would be a better example: they need two turns to fully process their food, if you get my meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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Or a dog? Sometimes I have to wonder about the weird conversations we could have in Irish based on this course.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Does 'faoi' here mean something other than 'under' or 'about'? Is it more like the French 'fois' for 'time' or 'instance'? 'Times two'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niamhwitch
niamhwitch
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Yes. This link talks about this at the bottom: http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/adverb.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Critter80
Critter80
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Her pronunciation of dhó is terrible. It sounds like a g and not dh or gh.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oboak
oboak
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Second breakfast, anyone?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikael.Antares

I'm certain there's a perfect reason why this sentence exists: namely the prevalence of cooks with short term memory loss, allowing for people to be served dinner twice.

3 years ago
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