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  5. "Imím ar maidin leis an mbuac…

"Imím ar maidin leis an mbuachaill agus fillim leis an gcailín."

Translation:I leave in the morning with the boy and I return with the girl.

September 16, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValaCZE

What is the difference between "imím" and "fágaim"? They both mean leave right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flying_Frenchman

This was explained in a couple other threads. imím => I leave/depart fágaim => I leave (something/someone behind)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

However you can also use Fág to mean "Leave a place."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianDuffy3

The root of the verb is imigh, to go, fág is to leave. You can use both So "Imím ar maidin" is I go in the morning or "fágaim ar maidin" is i leave in the morning. This fits in with these phrases i know of "Táim ag imeacht", I'm going. "Tá sí imithe", she is gone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamckillip48

So 'I go in the morning...' should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgodawgOcean

Like dejar vs. salir for those who speak spanish. Dejar=Fágann and Salir=Imigh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil704602

In this sentence, the word order is the same order as in English. Really confusing. Sorry if my 1st post on this site is a silly one. Loving learning the language. 2 months since i started and on a 41 day streak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owl-Griffon

Dude, me too. 41-day streak I mean. I started the course a year or two ago, but wasn't invested and only did a few lessons. 41 days ago, I picked it up hardcore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAni4
  • 1087

It's so much quicker now all you need to do is self-declare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PadiS46

Can anyone here the 'n' in 'an' gcailin? I thought it was 'a gcailin' (his girl)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patbo

Another way to recognise it is that the only word that makes sense between leis ... gcailín is an. If you were to say with their girl, you wouldn't use leis, but lena gcailín.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Apparently there's a difference in the sound of an with the "n" elided, and the possessive a - but there's no way that you'll ever learn that difference here.

Also note that a gcailín is "their girl" - "his girl" is a chailín.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaddyCazenove0

'fillim' is not used in Munster Irish and tiocaim thar nais should be assepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryEllyn3

there isn't enough room for all the answer boxes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1485

Take a screenshot that demonstrates the problem, and submit a bug report with the screenshot.

The people who can fix that sort of problem don't read sentence discussions. You could also post in the troubleshooting forum, if you want.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaNaefF

So "I leave with the boy in the morning and I return with the girl" Was wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silvith

I leave with the boy in the morning and return with the girl - I omitted the second I in I return with the girl, and my answer counted as wrong. Is there a reason behind this, or should I just report my answer next time as one that should also be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1485

In general, adding additional answers in English is a waste of time. The course is teaching Irish, not English, so you should be qualified to figure out for yourself whether "and returned with the girl" is an acceptable alternative to the actual translation, which explicitly includes the pronoun.

If your concern is about your answer being rejected, rather than what is "acceptable English", then just translate the Irish sentence, pronoun and all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leannx

when does imím mean i go and when does it mean i leave?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1485

imigh means "leave" in the sense of "go away". Imím ar maidin culd be "I go away in the morning".

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