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  5. "An ghrianghrafadóireacht."

"An ghrianghrafadóireacht."

Translation:The photography.

September 16, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackVMacK

I saw this word and my brain seized up for about twelve seconds.

Then I parsed it and felt better. But there was still that moment of feeling as though I had just been slapped in the face with a live cuttlefish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaalaE
  • 1553

I am so glad that I am not the only one who nearly collapsed by looking at that word for the first time. But I'm afraid that I will have a lot of typos when I actually have to write it down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonikaKathleen

I know what you mean. Wow! You almost need a photo to remember all the letters involved.


[deactivated user]

    This is nothing compared to some of the compound words in German, lol!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobArrgh

    Great visual, cflovett! I saw the word and started breaking it down and was thrilled tyo have gotten it right. Don't know if i can spell it yet, though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fingolfin1346

    They seem to be right, but they don't seem to have noticed that they quote it in the genitive case, which adds an -a to the end. http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fgb/grianghrafad%C3%B3ireacht


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chromalogue

    That's a small relief; at least everything else is going to be shorter!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

    Ainmnim 'samhailchomharthaigh" mar focal is fáide sa dteanga.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

    Nilim go maith ar an matamaitic, seans go bhfuil sé an dara focal is fáide


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1447

    Verbs conjugate, so while the root is shorter than "ghrianghrafadóireacht", the 1st person plural past tense "shamhailchomharthaíomar" is longer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

    tá an-phointe agat ansin!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sprivard

    That's quite interesting. I have to say, this is one of my favourite words I've encountered so far, and now I know why!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flying_Frenchman

    is it possible to break this word down into different parts?

    It starts with "ghrian" which means sun, which makes sense since pictures take in light, but what about the rest?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anfeardathuil

    Don't forget that ghriangraf means photograph.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

    So, I guess the "graf" bit is the same as the "graph" in English and other languages (picture).

    I'm wondering if the end of it comes from "dóire" (burner) or some root of that having to do with burning? (pictures burned by the sun?)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

    The -(e)adóir suffix indicates a person or object associated with a particular action or role. For example, grianghrafadóir is a photographer, and uaireadóir is a watch.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enifish

    So does this literally translate to "the thing a photographer does"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    From its components, its literal translation would be something like “sunlightgraphatoracy” — so yes, it’s the action of a photographer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

    Thank you, Lancet!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoteyJoe

    Once you say it out loud it's not so daunting. At least for me.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue81702

    it would have been nice to have audio to go with all those letters to be able to sound it out!!! The frequent lack of audio is very frustrating!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1447

    You can hear grianghrafadóireacht here:
    http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/grianghrafad%C3%B3ireacht

    Note that the pronunciation database at teanglann.ie doesn't include the definite article, or the lenition that it would cause in this feminine word.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadiaDobryanska

    Looks like a German person bit the Irish person who invented this word


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan440188

    Fun Fact! This word, though not in it's exact form here, is the longest word in the Irish Language. Said form being such: "Ghrianghrafadóireachta."

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