Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/truemi

The Word "Chaipas?"

truemi
  • 25
  • 12
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5

I was reading an article yesterday about the translation of a book from English to French, and came across the mentioning of the word "chaipas," which the author claimed to be a colloquial form of "Je na sais pas." However, when, out of curiosity, I searched the word up, I could find no context or definition of such a word. I was wondering if "chaipas" actually existed, or if it is only a regional term.
On that note of colloquial words, I'm guessing that what we learn here in Duo is more formal than day-to-day speech. Does anyone know of any good sites that list the more everyday way of speaking?

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pozine
pozine
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3

It is not gramatically correct. You wouldn't use it in a writing context. Just write "Je ne sais pas" instead. You'll look much more literate. French is my native language and I have never used or seen this form in any french book or writing ever.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truemi
truemi
  • 25
  • 12
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5

All right, but for casual speaking to another person or dialogue in a book where you want the characters to sound realistic, would you use this term?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pozine
pozine
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3

In Québec where I live, in a dialogue we use :

"Je sais pas" or "J'sais pas" or even "Chai pas" (Ché pas).

The later is very very familiar and informal but is used quite a lot here. For France and the rest of the french world, I don't know!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truemi
truemi
  • 25
  • 12
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5

Would you ever use "Je ne sais pas," where you are, or is that considered too stiff and formal?

And just a memory refresher for me, would the very informal "Chai pas" be used with only close family very close and those people younger than you? (I'm thinking of the tu/vous classification)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pozine
pozine
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3

Je NE sais pas is too formal here. Je sais pas seems ok (without the negation).

I have really rarely heard people say Je ne sais pas with the "ne". You would probably attract some weird looks by saying that.

I can only speak for myself but I try too be a little more formal with strangers. But I never go all formal and use the form Je ne sais pas. Only : Je sais pas, J'sais pas and Ché pas. With relatives, and family members I use whatever form I'd like to use except Je ne sais pas.

I don't know if my answer is clear, it has been a while since I have written somthing in english. :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truemi
truemi
  • 25
  • 12
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5

Thank you. Yes, it was clear (to me) although I spotted a few mistakes, but I make them, too.
Would you use "Chai pas" with a child younger than you if you have never met him before? Or would that be considered too familiar? Also (sorry that I'm bombarding you with questions!) what is the difference between "je sais pas" and "j'sais pas"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pozine
pozine
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3

The difference would be the equivalent of He is and He's in english. Just a way to shorten things up. The meaning remains the same.

Yeah, I would use Chai pas with a child. The only time I wouldn't use it (IMHO) is when speaking to strangers and people of "higher status" like elders, doctors and teachers.

Just don't be too formal (Je ne sais pas) ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwasrobbed

Agreed, I hear this all the time in Montréal. It just seems to be a compression of the normal sentence to speed it up a bit. "Je ne sais pas" ... or phonetically "Shay pas"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoDaisuki
DuoDaisuki
  • 16
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

This is the first time that I hear about it, interesting! Apparently, you have to write it as "chai pas." http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=438110

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truemi
truemi
  • 25
  • 12
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5

Thank you for the information! Now that I think of it, I suppose it would make more sense to write it as two words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DXLi
DXLi
Mod
  • 25
  • 8
  • 4

This is the equivalent of "dunno" in English. It's extremely casual and shouldn't be used in writing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissKitty10

I have never herd of that word before.

4 years ago