"La niña come una naranja."

Translation:The girl eats an orange.

5 years ago

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Aron89ification
Aron89ification
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I'm trying to understand the pronunciation of "naranja". The "j" has a very peculiar sound.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eckerbr
eckerbr
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I agree. It almost sounds like "Na-ran-hua" rather than "Na-ran-ha". My mouth does not want to pronounce it properly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halloayumu
halloayumu
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The "j" in spanish sounds similar to the "h" in the english word "hat".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somberskater

spanish alphabet?? J es ha.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrienneyan

I know "j" sounds like "ha." What I don't understand is that I hear a subtle "k" [na-rahnk-ha] or something...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlemagn506009

That's how it sounds with a native spanish speakers accent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbidChowdhury

I always mix naranja with naranga

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nickie.b.

Whst is naranga

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nel_22

its an orange

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaitlinLinder

it is supposed to sound chunky

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MieshaShaw1

Same

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dnyce4

It's a H sound

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmoney243

How do you know when the translation for "come" would be eat, eats, or ate?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skapata
Skapata
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If the verb is in the third person, it is "eats". So, "él come" and "ella come" are "he eats" and "she eats". When the verb is in the polite second person, it is "eat". So, "usted come" is "you eat". "Come" is never "ate". For "ate", there is another tense you will learn in another lesson.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no2eragonfan

Yes. Unfortunately, Duolongo fails to teach this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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If you mouseover the words and click "Conjugation" it helps explain things, just not explicitly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KukkuFalken

Thank u !

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahernandez12345

The j makes a h sound

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StillDreaming

Yes, that is true in many cases, like the word "Mujer"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12mohamad12

The "j" sound in Spanish actually sounds like the letter "خ" in Arabic. (NO, I AM NOT KIDDING, SEARCH FOR YOURSELF EVEN.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AashaySC

Yes it does sound like the kh of arabic

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/artsytigerzz

Yeah, it does! My family speaks Arabic, and I too realized that!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherleWill

I put. "The girl eats an Orange" and got it wrong. Una is a/an not One. Why did I get it wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nickie.b.

I put the girl eats a orange why did i get it wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwchandler

Its interesting that both Spanish and English both could not think of another name for oranges than to name them after the color.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarzouqRah

It is supposed to be an orange not 'a' orange

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuizBelkis

The girl eats an orange

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fleetchick

How come 'come' is pronounced as if there is an accent on the end when there isn't?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halloayumu
halloayumu
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I think you may refer to this:

cómo = how, como = I eat

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somberskater

YES GOOD. ALL QUESTION WORDS HAVE AN ACCENT SOMEWHERE ON IT! (:

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halloayumu
halloayumu
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Oh, in latin american countries like Argentina or El Salvador, sometimes we say "comé". It is something know as "voceo" and the pronunciation is slighly diferent. I can not explain it just writing... but I can say that the accent in spanish is the sillable where is the strongest sound in the word. You can write "come" and "comé" in spanish in google translator and hear the difference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somberskater

Cause theres not lol. Theres an invisible accent over the o. Because it ends in a vowel you cant put it there. (I know thats stupid but theres a whole huge lesson for it. You put accents on certain places for certain things)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valestellarium

There is no accent and there shouldn't be any accent. When you pronunciate it, you stress the syllable "co".

Also: http://www.duolingo.com/comment/1602562

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigRed79
BigRed79
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Because every vowel is sounded out in Spanish x

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kylie43

i do not like how if you spell some thing wrong you get it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Songbiird

By counting a misspelling as being wrong Duolingo is also trying to help you WRITE Spanish correctly along with speaking it correctly. ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somberskater

It lets you get it right. Its happened to me many a time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranny7

Only sometimes...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerianaalb

I know it takes away all my hearts

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eathan.bar

I know right

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nickie.b.

It just wants you to buy hearts

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m1c45

so an orange for us is the same word for the color orange. does this apply in spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halloayumu
halloayumu
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Orange (fruit): naranja. Orange (color): anaranjado.

But in some cases, when we describe things, in spanish, we're also lazy and sometimes we say "naranja" to refer to the color. So, here in El Salvador where I live in some cases we say "La casa naranja/La casa anaranjada", "El coche naranja/el coche anaranjado" and it is understandable in both cases.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nickie.b.

No it does not because some peole who speak engrish are lazy

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeasonArmstrong

Could someone please explain why it is so important to use 'an' instead of 'a'? Thank you!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halloayumu
halloayumu
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Because in english they never use "a" befora a noun that starts by a vowel. Instead, use "an", and then the noun. (But wait, it is supposed that we're learning spanish, or english? Hehehe. )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Free-Da-La-Hoya

bvyup

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamieJames10

Think juan

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gwik1

boooooooooooooooooooo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Srikriti1

does una mean an or a

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/riverchicken333

Isn't the food orange anaranja? As opposed to the color orange naranja.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kel48869

I like that "kha" sound for j like in naranja and mujeres . I never had much use for my nose while speaking Swahili and English

2 years ago
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