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"Læser du aviserne?"

Translation:Do you read the newspapers?

4 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dudurbak

avisen and aviserne sound pretty much the same...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BashP
BashP
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I don't think so as you can hear: a-vi-sen-a (the final a sound is noticeable in the audio).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Magister_Smith

So, just as in English, yes/no questions are formed by inverting the word order of subject and verb?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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Pretty much! Just Danish uses the verb itself, whereas English adds the auxiliary "do"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoMikhail

Why is the statement "Du laeser aviserne?" wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/a.mberleon
a.mberleonPlus
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In Danish, they use this thing called "inversion" where they have to switch the order of the words in certain cases. And, one of those cases is in questions. Instead of the English sentence structure in questions: question word (such as how, why, who, what, etc.)-auxiliary (words such as do, does, etc.)-subject (I, you, they, he, etc.)-verb-object, in Danish, they drop the auxiliary word and switch the verb and subject places, making it go in the order of: question word-verb-subject-object.

So, for example let's take the question in English, "Why does he drink the milk?" "Why" would be the question word, "does" the auxiliary, "he" the subject, "drink" the verb, and "the milk" would be the object. Now, if you translate that sentence into Danish, it would be "Hvorfor drikker han mælken?" Just as I said before, it came out in the same order that they have in Danish, "Hvorfor" (Why) being the question word, "drikker" (drinks) being the verb, "han" (he) the subject, and "mælken" (the milk) being the object.

Of course, if you were to literally translate the Danish version of that question in English it would make no sense, coming out to be, "Why drinks him the milk?" But, if you remember that order, you'll be able to translate that sentence back and fourth into English and Danish, with it making sense in both languages.

In the case of this question however, it does not have a question word, which makes it easier. In English, it would be, "Do you read the newspapers?", still keeping the auxiliary and everything else without a question word. So, just dropping the "do" and switching the "read" and "you", you would get a grammatically correct sentence in Danish, "Læser du aviserne?"

TL;DR, Basically, to make the sentence actually grammatically correct and understandable in Danish, you'd have to switch the "du" and "læser" around, making it "Læser du aviserne", because they write the verb before the subject in questions.

I hope you found this helpful! Hopefully I explained it In Danish, they use this thing called "inversion" where they have to switch the order of the words in certain cases. And, one of those cases is in questions. Instead of the English sentence structure in questions: question word (such as how, why, who, what, etc.)-auxiliary (words such as do, does, etc.)-subject (I, you, they, he, etc.)-verb-object, in Danish, they drop the auxiliary word and switch the verb and subject places, making it go in the order of: question word-verb-subject-object.

So, for example let's take the question in English, "Why does he drink the milk?" "Why" would be the question word, "does" the auxiliary, "he" the subject, "drink" the verb, and "the milk" would be the object. Now, if you translate that sentence into Danish, it would be "Hvorfor drikker han mælken?" Just as I said before, it came out in the same order that they have in Danish, "Hvorfor" (Why) being the question word, "drikker" (drinks) being the verb, "han" (he) the subject, and "mælken" (the milk) being the object.

Of course, if you were to literally translate the Danish version of that question in English it would make no sense, coming out to be, "Why drinks him the milk?" But, if you remember that order, you'll be able to translate that sentence back and fourth into English and Danish, with it making sense in both languages.

In the case of this question however, it does not have a question word, which makes it easier. In English, it would be, "Do you read the newspapers?", still keeping the auxiliary and everything else without a question word. So, just dropping the "do" and switching the "read" and "you", you would get a grammatically correct sentence in Danish, "Læser du aviserne?"

TL;DR, Basically, to make the sentence actually grammatically correct and understandable in Danish, you'd have to switch the "du" and "læser" around, making it "Læser du aviserne", because they write the verb before the subject in questions.

I hope you found this helpful! Hopefully I explained this thoroughly enough!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaJT

Why is it avisERNE and not avisENE?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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Because the plural of avis is aviser, therefore the definite article takes the -erne rather than -ene. The -ene form is used for words with any other ending for the plural (including no extra ending at all), for example: aviser to aviserne, huse to husene, sko to skoene and muffins to muffinsene (or muffinserne according to Den Danske Ordbog)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaJT

Thank you! This really helped!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miriamiriamiriam

Does this mean "do you read the newspaper?" or "are you reading the newspaper?" they are quite different meanings in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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It means both. In Danish you can use the simple present tense for both the habitual and continuous forms in English. Context normally makes it clear and other words can be added or other structures can be used but it's most common, at least in my experience, to just use the simple present where English would use the continuous where context makes it clear.

1 year ago