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"Él sabe nadar."

Translation:He knows how to swim.

5 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Benjamin17
Benjamin17
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I think "he knows to swim" should be accepted. In a situation: If he falls off of the boat, he knows to swim. I don't agree that its marked incorrectly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjsiege87

I agree, although I also agree with angel194462 that it's kind of a clunky sentence. I think "El sabe como nadar" would be clearer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/furtivoalfredo

I wrote "He knows swimming." Why is this wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zelmon
Zelmon
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Even though this might actually could be correct, it is quite awkward. You can translate infinitives into gerund form as a noun, but not in this case.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabor123
gabor123
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Please help. I am not a native English speaker. I thought "I can swim" and "i know how to swim" could mean the same thing as well (no matter that they could also mean something different ). So I believed I can say e.g. "I can go into the deep water, because I can swim, so I won't sink". Am I wrong? If I am, then I understand why "I can swim" is a wrong translation for "Él sabe nadar", but if not, then it should be accepted by Duo, isn't it? Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjsiege87

"I can swim" and "I know how to swim" express the same idea, but differently. One is stating that you have a direct capability - the knowledge is implied. The other is stating that you have knowledge that leads to a capability. In practical usage, they are synonymous, but there are subtle structural differences.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claudietta4

Why not "He is able to swim"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MorganPlain

"El sabe" means "he knows". Saying you know how to swim vs actually can swim are usually used such that they mean effectively the same thing but it could be used in the context of 'well I haven't tried before but I know the concept and motions of how to swim.' which is different to 'I physically am able to swim'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathan.r69

Where is the "how" in this translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MorganPlain

There isn't a literal translation, I think. "El sabe" means "he knows" and therefore in English you'd need to say "I know swimming" which doesn't make sense grammatically (and maybe 'swimming' is said differently in spanish?). "He knows how to swim" is the best translation. They aren't always going to translate word for word

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/labontek15

He knows to swim is also proper english

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThrashtilDeath

Shouldn't it be "Él sabe cómo nadar"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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I think the "how" is built into the verb "saber". When it is before a verb anyway.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/08acatra

I normally put "He knows how to swim" since that is what feels natural but I tried "He knows swimming" to see what happens and it didn't work, I don't see why the second shouldn't be accepted as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielMorg18

It should be "Él sabe como nadar"... He knows to swim should be accepted. Like, "he knows to call me when he lands" is different than "he knows how to call me"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/curtycooker

Would it be too expensive to re-record all these audio files so they are a little easier to understand, and don't sound so robotic?

1 year ago