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  5. "Wo ist die Not?"

"Wo ist die Not?"

Translation:Where is the need?

June 4, 2013

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

The sentence in German is bad. You would say "Wo ist die Notwendigkeit?". "Not" is much stronger than "need", it's more like hardship. Asking "Wo ist die Not?" comes across as very sarcastic.

June 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Thanks, for pointing that out. 100% agree. I answered using hardship, and it was marked OK.

Still, the German sentence is odd, and can be misunderstood quite easily.

"Not" cannot be physically and therefore not anywhere, because it is a condition/state.

A proper German question would be: "Was is der Grund fuer die Not?" "Was ist die Notwendigkeit hier?" "Was ist noetig?" "Fehlt etwas" and hundreds more.

October 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

You can say "wo ist die Not am größten?" if you have a natural disaster and need to decide how to distribute the aid. But you are right that Not is a condition that you can't pinpoint to a location, but rather something that comes in shades of severity. If you have one specific group of persons "in Not", you would rather say "wo ist der Notfall?".

October 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Oh yes, this is absolutely right. But just to say: "Wo ist die Not" that's weird.

There is a colloq. expression which one may hear in German: "Wo drueckt der Schuh? = Where is the problem? "Wo brennt's denn?" = Where is the problem?

October 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattyJared

Personally, I think "where is the need" or "where is the distress" is fine.. and I'm a native English speaker. We often say, "I can't see the need.. (for something - but we don't necessarily state that "something).

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

You point it out, that you are a native English speaker and you refer to the English meaning by citing it.

Well, I speak English for about 20 years I agree with your above comment.

Sakasiru and I wanted to point out that the German phrase:

"Wo ist die Not?" is odd, -see above comments. We are both German native speakers. And my personal opinion is, when you translate: "Where is the need?" you should not end up with: "Wo ist die Not?" because it is misleading, for my personal understanding it is actually wrong to express it like that.

This shows that both languages have fine differences and only when you in control of the language you will notice them.

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin151651

Thank you very much for your comment. It has really helped me to understand the concept of the word "Not". I don't have any problems with what you said about the sentence being strange. However, after a little online research, it seems that the word "Not" can be translated as "need" only if used as "in Not". For example, "Die Menschen in Not" would be translated as "The people in need". Could you please confirm that this is correct? Thanks!

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinerSelb

yes, that's correct.

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon421138

May i ask the general purpose of the suffix "-keit" , how does it modify the word generally or is there no pattern?

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's a bit like "-ness, -hood, -ship" as in "happiness, likelihood, friendship".

December 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1095

-hood and -ness are good examples, since they share with -keit the function of turning adjectives to nouns. There are lots of others.
-ship is another category. It changes nouns to other (abstract) nouns.

December 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speakingKofi

What about the hardship?

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Look down and read Sakasiru's post. And I recommend to read mine too which is above somewhere. :-)

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speakingKofi

@backtoschool I was refering to the @fehrerdef comment just above saying that "-ship is another category. It changes nouns to other (abstract) nouns." What about the hardship, then? Does hardship match to that scheme? Is that comment correct?

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1095

well, the suffix has no meaning of its own. It is used to make nouns from adjectives.

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/case02

Would poverty work?

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tmrn21

Why not "Where is the problem?"

October 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izzitty

I thought "Not" means Emergency? :/

March 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

Notfall means emergency. Not means hardship or distress.

March 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izzitty

Oh I see.. Thanks for clearing that up for me! :)

March 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f0xG3_PatG

Is "Notfall" only applicable to say... medical emergencies or something that involves "Unfälle"?

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is "Notfall" only applicable to say... medical emergencies

No. It can be any kind of emergency where quick or unusual actions are required.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingLass

Native English speaker here. When I was in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, I saw signs inside the trains that used the word "Not" in the same way that English signs on American public transportation would use the word "emergency". I'm not saying that "Not" is the dictionary word for "emergency", but it seems like it can be used in the same way.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

On those sings, "Not" wasn't used alone, but as part of a compound word, like "Notbremse" or "Notausstieg", the same way "Notfall" is a compound word. In that function, it really has the same meaning as "emergency" in the word "emergency exit", Still, "Not" alone would not be used in the same way as "emergency" alone.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coto.i
  • 1675

What does "fall" mean? In Unfall, Notfall... Thanks.

April 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Literally, "a fall", as in when someone falls down.

But like Latin, it can also mean "a case" as in "what befalls one; a state of affairs" -- casus there meant both "an occasion; an accident" and "a fall, a falling".

For example, a detective might be working on a "Fall", and the accusative case is also a "Fall".

An ein Unfall would be something like "an unfortunate case/situation/occurrence", ein Notfall "an emergency/need-ful case/situation/occurrence".

April 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daschaich

Motivated by Notfall I tried translating this as "Where is the emergency?" It was accepted, but I'm not sure it should have been.

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat211087

It doesn't accept it now (July 2019)

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jstillmank

Why not "where is the necessity?"

October 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jezolk

Same here

August 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saltedpotatoes

This sentence needs grammar lessons, tbh :T

March 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benutzer94

Big leap from distress to need. But thats the way it goes lol

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaredLong9

Why is it so hard to hear the difference between Die and Der? I always have to slow it down to hear which one it is. What's the deal with German R's?

January 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phillbo

What is wrong with "Where is the discomfort?"

December 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

@all above: Discomfort, problem, necessity and so on are all way too weak words. Die Not means really dire straits.

March 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phillbo

Thank you

March 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeepMantri

yeah thanks!

July 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/littlamb

Why not "Where is the problem"?

May 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

can we say what is the need?

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Hi, if you say: "What is the need?" You ask for things in need, not for an emergency situation or the-like. {"Not" means emergency situation, dire straits, hardship, distress, etc.} So the answer is NO in this context. When you just do a CTRL+F {need} on this very page and read the comments above you will see, that the English need and the German Not, don't go together in this context. A simple translation a word without context don't get you there.

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

ok, thanks for that response...

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uberling

I typed, "Where is the need?" and was marked wrong, with the correct response being "Where is the need?" :-/

February 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerRivero0

This is my answer: Where is the need?

And it was marked wrong, why?

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Odd. As a native speaker of British English I read Wo ist die Not? and searched in my head for "Where is the necessity, distress or affliction?" and then started thinking about geographical locations like "the Middle East, Greece, the American South" and so on. We are not really asking WHERE the "need" is, but "WHAT" it is.

December 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Purehero49

As soon as i read the comments full of sincerity, i feel satisfied again to be in the right path like the others sharing their comments with their. supporting experiences.

August 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/red2121

I asked my German native friend to tell me the meaning behind this sentence. First he asked for context lol. Then he said it means: "why is that important to you?" Or "What point makes it important to you?"

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/051930

Ok so "where is the problem" would be the closest thing we would say in english

May 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Not really. Somebody whose house has just been firebombed, leaving him with only the clothes on his back, has a bit more than just "a problem".

"Not" is pretty severe.

October 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth528513

It sounds like the speaker is saying a U! Nut or something, not Not.

December 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JarrodFischer

I'm convinced not a single German made this course.

May 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1095

not true

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flitteriefie

what are these sentences???

January 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsunami_n

What do you mean? This is the comments, where you can share your thinking with fellow learners, idk if i answered your question exactly...

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasgric3

What's bothering you -- <<< why is that not correct

June 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Omerzohar1

ICH HABE DIE NOT, DIE NOT, FÜR SPEED!

September 14, 2015
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