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"De soep is duur."

Translation:The soup is expensive.

4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dnbbtt

As an Australian, in this context I would more likely use "dear" than "expensive" and as stated "duur" sounds like "dear" as has been the case with many other Dutch words that I have come across in my short time here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RymeLegis
RymeLegis
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Same here, as a Brit. Amusingly, the British English "dear" (expensive) and Dutch "duur" are cognates (words with the same roots).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sovay
sovay
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Just for fun: "Every summer we can rent a cottage In the Isle of Wight if it's not too dear We shall scrimp and save" McCartney, When I'm 64

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Dear

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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This has been suggested multiple times, but I've never heard the word "dear" used this way. Is it a British thing, maybe? And if so, does it make sense as a description of soup?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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I think that it's chiefly British, and probably old-fashioned even in that context. It's the original meaning; as a term of endearment, this is a metaphor for the value of the person. I don't use it myself[^footnote], but I read it sometimes. Merriam-Webster gives ‘eggs are very dear just now’ as a usage example[^fn2], so it should work for soup as well. It also appears in clichés such as ‘sell [one's] life dearly’. And of course it is cognate to Dutch ‘duur’ (and German ‘teuer’).

[^footnote]: I'm American, so there's no reason that I would use it if it's British. (I often make conscious choices between linguistic conventions, so I end up using more Britishisms than most Americans. But I don't have any reason to adopt this one.)

[^fn2]: With the additional British-like understatement ‘just now’ where I would say ‘these days’ or ‘lately’.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Thanks for the explanation!

We might see if any British people want to chip in, before making a decision. As a rule of thumb, we don't accept particularly old-fashioned or archaic words, because we have to drawn the line somewhere. And more importantly, we have to be particularly careful with cognates like this: just because it sounds similar or comes from the same root, does not guarantee that the meaning is precisely the same. So we want to encourage people to pick a natural translation, rather than a little-used cognate.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bradley95
Bradley95
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I'm British and I can definitely say 'dear' is a common term for expensive in the UK.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sinbad_

Same in ireland! Very common

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

Me too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex.Essilfie
Alex.Essilfie
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The same in Ghana, albeit we're a former British colony.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mishg_khan
mishg_khan
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By the way in Russian language there is no separate word for "expensive". The only word is used in both meanings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emily.simp1

I'm from New Zealand and often use "dear" to mean "expensive", and I'm not the only one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterSearl

I got this wrong just now using 'dear' instead of expensive.

I've only heard british and irish people use this term but it is still a word one would hear fairly often in these parts.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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OK. For the record, I wasn't trying to make an argument here, so much as writing something down to help me remember. (When I see ‘duur’ or ‘dure’, I'll remember its meaning more easily if I remember that it's cognate to ‘dear’.) If I wanted to say that Duolingo should accept it as a translation, I'd do that with a report. (Which I may or may not have done, if I was testing the boundaries; I don't remember if I did that. I get a little more reckless when I'm near the end of a lesson if I have lots of hearts left!)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatelynVB

What is the difference between "duur" and "dure"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somerandomlamb

and so worth it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clrtnb
clrtnb
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I'm a Canadian, and I understand "the soup is dear" to mean the soup is expensive. I don't much use "dear" this way myself and feel it's slightly old-fashioned, perhaps British. But I might use it, and I completely accept the usage as correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FGryphius
FGryphius
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That word is great!

Not only does it seem to match the root and meaning of german "teuer", but in the Austrian dialect I speak, teuer is also exactly pronounced like this

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goaten1
goaten1
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Duur=dyr in Swedish. However in Norwegian dyr is dier (animal) :D

1 year ago