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  5. "Katten gemmer sig."

"Katten gemmer sig."

Translation:The cat is hiding.

September 18, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lindaslair

Haha, so wonderful when language reveals the culture. I think many of the Danes I know would agree that the best way to save yourself is to lie low, or hide!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADrunkenPirate

Was that a sneaky dig at World War 2?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lindaslair

Yes, DrunkenPirate, lying low was a technique that worked very well for some in WWII. However there was also a famous moment when King Christian X rode out into the street on his horse, wearing an armband with the Star of David on it. Today I feel that moment was echoed when more than 30,000 people in KBH (and others elsewhere) gathered, held their heads high and said very firmly that they as a nation will not stand for hatred, racism or intolerance. I am very proud of Denmark tonight. https://www.dr.dk/Nyheder/Indland/Video/2015/02/16/202456.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lariwestside

So "gemmer" itself is "to save", but "gemmer sig" is "to hide [oneself]"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jansamu

"Gemmer" is "to save" in the sense of saving for later. "Redder" is "to save" in the sense of rescuing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erikblomqvist

No, "han gemmer en øl" would be "he's hiding a beer". I'm Swedish myself, and for us, the same word "gömmer" does only mean "to hide" and I think that's the general concept in most Danish sentences as well. But it could me to save, in terms of saving a file to a disk, for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackinaboxx

Danish native speaker weighing in here.

I disagree, "han gemmer en øl" could mean that he's saving it for later, but in order to be explicit about it, you could tack on til senere, so it becomes "han gemmer en øl til senere", so it becomes "he is saving a beer for later". However, in most situations, you probably wouldn't need to be explicit about it, since if you're in a group of people, and you're telling them that "han gemmer en øl", they'd most likely know that you mean that he's saving it for later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blkx-Darkreaper

My understanding is redder is "to rescue", gemmer is "to hide". "Gemmer sig" would essentially be "hide from yourself", thus saving it. Similar to the french word cache "to hide" but in english it is used to refer to a hidden supply or reserve, to cache something is to save it for later


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zacharydetrick

Yup, my cat is sitting under the table (mostly) hidden from view as I write this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadine549036

So "gemmer" is "saving" and "hiding"? I dont see it..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agnes125108

The help sais gemmer means saving. Why doesnt the app accept it then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jutas

so "sig" is the same as "sin/sit"?what is it for and why can't we use "sin" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blkx-Darkreaper

Sin/sit are used for possession. Sig refers to self. Katten gemmer sig, the cat hides itself


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatPetersen127

So "sig" refers to the subject instead of using "mig, dig, etc."? Just like "sin/sit" does?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blkx-Darkreaper

Ya mig, dig and sig are used to refer to the subject and mit, dit, and sit are used to indicate possession respectively


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dr.vive

Sig is a "reflexive" pronoun; sin/sit are "possessive" pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veronica1694

i am actually getting these on the first try !!!! i feel so wonderful...but i dont as yet know that or any similar word!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenMrlt

Can we also say: Jeg gemmer mig. ?

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