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"No te oigo, ¿tú me oyes?"

Translation:I do not hear you, do you hear me?

5 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yazeedabalkhail

This is getting intense

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Why not "I do not listen to you. Do you listen to me?"? How would this be said?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiraDehnel

I believe escuchar is better for "to listen."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trevzilla

that's what I put, I'd like to know as well

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FurysCane

same here

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

in Argentina they say: "no te escucho, me escuchas?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyNachoLibre

DAMN YOU VERIZON MAN

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShikharOfEarth

People having bad cell reception use this often

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Is this really how you would punctuate and structure this question ',¿' ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You need a space (as Duolingo says), but if you are asking if a comma can go before a question mark, yes, it can. Examples: "¡Ya verás! ¿Veré qué?", "No. ¿Tú lo sabes?", "Hola, ¿qué tal?", "¿Cuándo? ¿Mañana?", etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Babella Hola, ¿Qué tal? It seemed appropiate as you once again comevto the rescue. Couple of quick questions.

Is that an exclamation mark (upside down) at the beginning of the sentence? Do I need to use it if the sentence ends with one?

Are there specific names for ¡ and the ¿?

Are these the only unusual marks in spanish?

Gracias. Ayuda a todos nosotros a aprender.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Hola, rmcgwn ;] De nada, me alegro de poder ayudar ^^

Yes, we use both to mark either questions or exclamations, they are called "signos de interrogación" (question marks, both "¿" and "?") and "signos de exclamación" (exclamation marks, both "¡" and "!"), we call the first ones ("¡" and "¿") "de apertura" and the final ones ("!" and "?") "de cierre" (it may be different in other places, that is how I learned it).

The rules are the same as always: capital letters after a stop, space after the comma, etc., they simply mark where a question or exclamation starts. When you say "Hello, Mary!", you would say "¡Hola, Mary!" in Spanish. Same as with the "¿Qué tal?" you just wrote.

As far as I know, there are not that many unusual marks in Spanish when compared to English. When it comes to punctuation I can only think of those and the "raya" (dash?) that we use to mark dialogues. Example:

"Hi, Mary", said Peter. = —Hola, Mary —dijo Peter.

I think quotation marks also work a bit different, maybe because our dialogues are not written with this: ". But since I saw you used single ones ' ', I guess that is different too. Here you can see how ours work: http://spanish.about.com/od/writtenspanish/a/angularquotes.htm

Hope that was useful! Have a nice day ♫

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kooky13

is this better understood as I cannot/can or I do not/do ? (I seem to question duo way more than I should but I REALLY want more native input). I realize both ways are very similar and in many cases where I ask about small details I understand what the sentence means, even if its isn't in a literal word for word sense, which is what is important I guess.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I am not native but a student just like you. I try to share and learn from the comments. My understanding is that "do not/do" doesn't exist in spanish so its implied. Can/cannot requires the verb poder.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kooky13

You're a better student than I am for sure. Thanks (again)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul395293

I don't know if the Spanish phase is good or not but the English "I don't hear you. Do you hear me?" Is somewhat pidgin English (ie no native speaker expresses this in this way). A better phrase would be 'I can't hear you. Can you hear me?'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdwardDov

That is not true at all. As a native english speaker I can tell you that "can't" and "don't" do not necessarily mean the same thing. There is nothing pidgin about that first sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Duo accepted my "I can't hear you, can you hear me?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newera3s
newera3s
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(Spam) No rollers after 11pm? Rules without conversation... tripping hazards...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdwardDov

I wish i better understood what this LITERALLY meant so I could form the thought more like a native speaker.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bita199964

Am I supposed to say it back in Spanish or in English?

1 year ago