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  5. "You like food."

"You like food."

Translation:Is maith leat bia.

September 19, 2014

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthPontifex

Okay yeah, duolingo, I could drop a couple pounds. Judgemental software...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

As if duolingo's the one to talk. A green owl. What's healthy about that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daarmcd

Is maith liom é. = I like it.

Is maith leat é. = You like it.

Is maith leis é. = He likes it.

Is maith léi é. = She likes it.

Is maith linn é. = We like it.

Is maith libh é. = You like it.

Is maith leo é. = They like it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daarmcd

Growing up in Ireland we had verb conjugation drilled into us in Irish class.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/volryn

Omfg thank you so much, lacking this table has been rough ❤


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisoTomus

A dont understat what is diferend between "is maith liom" and "is maith leat" ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeesKiwi

liom is "with me" and leat is "with you"--so is maith liom means "I like" while is maith leat is "You like".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aeserica

It knows me so well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smcgee7

I know I have read it somewhere, but now am not sure where, but when is the h added to a consonant for lenition? I cannot remember the term for adding the h either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UaSirideain

After "mo (my)", "do (your)", "a (his)" and if the noun is feminine, after "an (the (singular))".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

“Lenition” is the term for adding the H after a consonant. As the lessons progress, you’ll discover other circumstances which also call for lenition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OMZ9Vd

I like it really well because its fun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conner488526

How would you ask "do you like food"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patbo

The question form of is is an, so would would say: An maith leat bia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexMoby

What is the difference between mbia and bia ? Thanks for the answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Bia is the base form of the word; mbia is the eclipsed form, used in certain grammatical circumstances (e.g. ár mbia, “our food”).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joeslugs

Is this still in the Verb Subject Object sentence order? I need to write it down for my notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Sentences with the copula is typically have a different word order, although the verb in this sentence remains first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joeslugs

Aah so this uses the copula... gotta recognize that. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gareththeunicorn

is maith bia bia is one of the options.: :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/powergirl25

what does leat mean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SivanaP.D.E.H.

So "is" is the chopail form which means it is used to introduce someone or something, but to say "you like food" seems like a description to me so it seems like you should use bí, but you don't. Would someone mind explaining it to me, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

When trying to translate the verb "to be" into Irish, you have to choose between two forms, the copula is and the verb . In that case, you decide whether your "to be" is "introduce someone or something" (not the most useful description of an chopail, IMO).

You're not trying to translate "to be" into Irish in this case, so you don't have to decide whether to use the copula or , therefore the "introduce someone or something" determiner is of no relevance.

"love", "like", "hate", "adore" etc are all verbs in English. In Irish you use the copula with a noun or an adjective and the preposition le to translate those verbs. That's just the way Irish expresses those types of verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaMaryG

of course I like good food only.......

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