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"Tá an t-iasc ag snámh fúibh."

Translation:The fish is swimming under you.

4 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PaddyJudge

But if you type 'The fish is swimming about you' it says incorrect answer though both under and about are given as options.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magickman
magickman
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I translated this as 'the fish are swimming around you'. Is that not an acceptable translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Faoi gives more of a meaning of "about", like something is about something, so under really is the best one here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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If you want to translate 'around something' into Irish, you can use the adverb 'timpeall' followed by the genitive form of the noun. There are other ways of translating it, but I'm afraid that 'faoi' isn't one of them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnorinder

I mostly puzzled over the pronunciation of fúibh [do: iv]? Why not [fo: iv]?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Because this speaker is awful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnorinder

You mean I'm not that off then in my puzzlement? :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanTravers
SeanTravers
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Why is "The fish swims under you" not accepted? Both "swimming" and "swims" are present-tense verbs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsunemimi
kitsunemimi
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"Swims" is the non-progressive form and the exercise wants the progressive form. Like English, Irish has a separate way to express the progressive form. "The fish swims under you" would be "snámhann an t-iasc fút/fúibh" while "the fish is swimming under you" is "tá an t-iasc ag snámh fút/fúibh"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanTravers
SeanTravers
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Thanks for clarifying! That makes sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudiRWM
RudiRWM
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But if one clicks "fuibh" to see the possibilities, it gives" around".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No. It gives "about you", in the sense of "It is about a fish".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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Right, but in English "about" and "around" both essentially describe the same circular sense of proximity. Things can be "around town" or "about town".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes, but the Irish word faoi cannot be used in that sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellie-bell

Why is underneath not acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Because the course creators didn’t anticipate it as a correct answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamckillip48

'about you' is given as a translation !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohannaMcKenna

Why is "There is a fish swimming under you" incorrect? How would you say that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnORiordan

Should under ye be acceptable?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

Yes, to be consistent with other exercises. Report it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WillowSkidmore

Out of curiosity, in what situation would your even be in where there was a fish swimming under you other than in open water?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emile110
Emile110
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The oceanium department of the zoo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joegLI
joegLI
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Why is "ag" used?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleDennis

The preposition "ag" (at) is used with a verb in Irish to create the English equivalent of a "gerund"--the "-ing" form of any verb. You could think of it as being "at" doing something--"tá ag snámh" is "being at swimming" but the translation just uses the English gerund.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielC.To2

How do we distinguish between fish singular and fish plural in Irish

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsunemimi
kitsunemimi
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Nominative: iasc (sg) and éisc (pl) Genitive: éisc (sg) and iasc (pl)

5 months ago