"D'ith sibh cheana."

Translation:You already ate.

4 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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"Cheana" should be pronounced hanna

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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If you're from Connamara, sure, but up further in Mayo and Donegal, she's be pronouncing it properly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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Are you sure? I've never heard it pronounced with initial /x'/.
It's /hanə/ in Munster, Connemara, /hani:/ in Tourmakeady (Mayo). According to the audio of the 'New English-Irish Dictinary' it's /h-/ in Ulster too.
Regardless, her pronunciation isn't Mayo or Donegal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I've always heard [ç] up here. I don't think she's pronouncing it that way on purpose though. If you compare the Ulster pronunciation to the Connacht pronunciation there, you'll hear extra friction at the beginning of the Ulster one, but it's softer like [ç] rather than [x].

Careful with your use of // vs []: phonemically, it's /x'/ everywhere, but the phonetic realisation varies.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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[ç] is different from [x].

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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That's what talideon is saying: phonetically /x/ in palatalised environments is [ç] (except in accents that render it as [h]), but as this is simply an allophone (variation) of /x/, it makes sense to phonemically (as opposed to phonetically) transcribe it as /xʲ/. In the same way English pan is [pʰæn] while span is [spæn]. The /p/ is aspirated ("ʰ") everywhere except after "s". As the sounds do not contrast, they should be considered as variations on the same sound in different environments (allophones), which is why phonemically [pʰæn] is /pæn/. []=phonetic, //=phonemic. For those who wonder how they'll ever pronounce [ç], it's the same as the "h" in "human" (at least in my accent!).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Is this word lenited, or is it always spelled that way?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It is always spelled that way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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I had been wondering if there were any words that always started with a consonant and then an 'h', or if the 'h' in that spot was reserved for lenition.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

There's a few others, like thíos and thuas

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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Any idea whether they were always spelled like that, back when séimhiú was represented with a buailte?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It wasn't just the séimhiú. It was any h that was represented with the buailte.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes — Dinneen’s dictionary shows entries such as ċeana, ċoiḋċe (modern choíche), ṫíos, ṫuas, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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I'll look out for those.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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Can this sentence mean 'you have already eaten'? I cannot think of an instance when I would use the English sentence that is given as the correct solution.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes — the FGB uses perfect aspects to translate the “already” meaning of cheana.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

Dad, can I have some food?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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'No, you have already eaten.'

I would not use 'You already ate' in this context. It would be non-standard in my idiolect, although it may work elsewhere (USA dialects?).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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Well, I'm English, and I see nothing strange about "you already ate"! Maybe it's the same in Ireland?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidcwalls
davidcwallsPlus
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In my area of the mid-Atlantic US, "you already ate" is quite common

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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Texan here; "You already ate" is perfectly acceptable and common.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrJackHackett

"you already ate" sounds strange to me also. We would normally add a have in there. "You have ate already" or "You have already eaten"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“You have ate already” sounds stranger to me than either “You have eaten already” or “You ate already”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrJackHackett

Must be a dialect thing "you ate already" sounds non-standard without the word "have" to me (I speak a hiberno English dialect)

eg:

Q: "Did I eat?" A: "you have ate already" or "you have already ate"

Q "Have I ate?" A "You have already eaten"

I also pronounce "ate" as "et" as opposed to "eight" :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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'You have eaten' is the standard English perfect form; 'you have ate' strikes me as a solecism, as would 'I have drank the tea' or 'he has rang the bell', for exactly the same reason, i.e. the confusion of the past tense form with the past participle.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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My versions of those questions and answers would be

  • Q: “Did I eat?” A: “Yes, you ate already.”
  • Q: “Have I eaten?” A: “Yes, you have eaten already.”

My guess is that “You ate already” has become acceptable in a US English context via Yiddish שוין or German schon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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Is 'cheana' really used on its own like this? I've only ever come across 'cheana féin'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The FGB shows that féin is optional.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sean_Roy
Sean_RoyPlus
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I've said this to my cats countless times.

1 year ago
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