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  5. "D'ith sibh cheana."

"D'ith sibh cheana."

Translation:You already ate.

September 20, 2014

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

Is this word lenited, or is it always spelled that way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It is always spelled that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

I had been wondering if there were any words that always started with a consonant and then an 'h', or if the 'h' in that spot was reserved for lenition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

There's a few others, like thíos and thuas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

I'll look out for those.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelBeal

Any idea whether they were always spelled like that, back when séimhiú was represented with a buailte?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It wasn't just the séimhiú. It was any h that was represented with the buailte.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes — Dinneen’s dictionary shows entries such as ċeana, ċoiḋċe (modern choíche), ṫíos, ṫuas, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelBeal

Is 'cheana' really used on its own like this? I've only ever come across 'cheana féin'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

Can this sentence mean 'you have already eaten'? I cannot think of an instance when I would use the English sentence that is given as the correct solution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes — the FGB uses perfect aspects to translate the “already” meaning of cheana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deserttitan

Dad, can I have some food?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

'No, you have already eaten.'

I would not use 'You already ate' in this context. It would be non-standard in my idiolect, although it may work elsewhere (USA dialects?).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

Well, I'm English, and I see nothing strange about "you already ate"! Maybe it's the same in Ireland?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidcwalls

In my area of the mid-Atlantic US, "you already ate" is quite common


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Texan here; "You already ate" is perfectly acceptable and common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrJackHackett

"you already ate" sounds strange to me also. We would normally add a have in there. "You have ate already" or "You have already eaten"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

“You have ate already” sounds stranger to me than either “You have eaten already” or “You ate already”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrJackHackett

Must be a dialect thing "you ate already" sounds non-standard without the word "have" to me (I speak a hiberno English dialect)

eg:

Q: "Did I eat?" A: "you have ate already" or "you have already ate"

Q "Have I ate?" A "You have already eaten"

I also pronounce "ate" as "et" as opposed to "eight" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

'You have eaten' is the standard English perfect form; 'you have ate' strikes me as a solecism, as would 'I have drank the tea' or 'he has rang the bell', for exactly the same reason, i.e. the confusion of the past tense form with the past participle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

My versions of those questions and answers would be

  • Q: “Did I eat?” A: “Yes, you ate already.”
  • Q: “Have I eaten?” A: “Yes, you have eaten already.”

My guess is that “You ate already” has become acceptable in a US English context via Yiddish שוין or German schon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I'm sure younger Brits would say "You already ate" and "You have already eaten" interchangeably without batting an eyelid, but "You already ate" is like fingernails on a blackboard to my ears.

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