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https://www.duolingo.com/Gitaana

Spanish letters "B" and "V"

Is there any rule which explains pronunciations of these letters? Or native speakers do not make differences between them?

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PepePerez14

La Real Academia Española de la lengua (RAE) dice que se pronuncian exactamente igual. Muchos alumnos españoles cometen errores al escribir.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_JavierP_
_JavierP_
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No, hace 400 años sí, pero hoy en día no hay diferencia

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanka_ps
Ivanka_ps
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I think it depends on where you are. For example, in Mexico the difference is so small that some people write down my name like "Ibana" instead of "Ivana" ¬¬.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Some dialects have a small difference, but in most they are the same. Both are pronounced with the lips in the form of a b but with a continuous sound like a v. Technical term, is, I believe, a bilabial fricative.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElimGarak

http://www.studyspanish.com/pronunciation/alphabet.htm

This site has an alphabet where you can click on the letters and you can hear them being pronounced, it might be helpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElimGarak

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSkG7L5fyyI I find having a video helps - this one goes through a list of words with b and v in them to help you how they sound.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gitaana

Thank you,I find this really helpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndresC.
AndresC.
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In most places of Latin America the pronunciation is pretty much the same, or the difference is too small for anyone to register. At least in the part of South America where I live, we pronounce both of them as just a "b", as in before.

In some places we just call them with their familiar names be grande (big b) and ve pequeña (small v). It goes without saying that when it comes to writing, you must always use the correct one, as making a mistake in that department, like writing benir instead of venir, is a "no-no".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjd1123
jjd1123
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As others have mentioned, they are usually pronounced identically. However, it also depends on the position of the letter in a word: At the beginning of a word and after "m" or "n", both "b" and "v" are pronounced similarly to "b" in English (only maybe a bit softer), but in other places it's a voiced fricative (which doesn't really exist in English). At least that's what I was taught once and what these articles claim:

http://spanish.about.com/od/spanishpronunciation/a/b.htm

http://www.studyspanish.com/pronunciation/letter_bv.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gitaana

Thanks a lot.I am asking this because I came across these rules too and I dont know whether I should learn them,or just not bother with that because I heard natives do not make differences between B and V.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceciale74

Cuando aprendés a leer y a escribir, en la escuela te enseñan que son diferentes. la "b" es más suave, los labios se tocan suavemente cuando la pronunciás. ej. beso, barco la "v" es más fuerte, los labios no se tocan y se apoya en el labio inferior los dientes del maxilar superior. En la practica no se siente diferencia, pero nunca vas a decir "vaca" rozando los labios. Por las dudas que sea un regionalismo. Esto es así en la Argentina.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkTheStrange
MarkTheStrange
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There is no pronunciation difference. As with almost all cases in all languages of things spelled differently but pronounced alike, they used to be pronounced differently, which is why there are two letters. But there is no difference anymore.

They do still represent two sounds, though. At the beginning of a word or after a consonant, they sound like English B. Between vowels, they sound sort of like English V - but you make the sound with your upper lip covering your upper teeth, not with your teeth touching your bottom lip. It's like a B that you don't quite close all the way.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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I think in some regions native speakers can tell the difference, but in most they can't. I had friends from Spain who simply couldn't hear the difference between the two of them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikos-
Nikos-
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I was once told that people in Span pronounce "v" as "b", and South Americans pronounce "v" as "v".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raynwl
Raynwl
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that's not true, one use the form who is more easy to pronounce for one, I live in Chile, Latinamerica and I say v but I've friends who say b

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I have had enough exposure to Spanish from a few places to know that is a gross over-generalization.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Mexican kids often confuse 'tuvo' and 'tubo' when learning to spell

3 years ago