"Do chuid airgid."

Translation:Your share of money.

September 20, 2014

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saerbhreathach

In English would it not be more correct to say "your share of THE money".... just seems more natural to me, although there is no definite article present here. someone let me know if I'm wrong....

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

I don't think that's the usual meaning of this sentence, it's just 'your money'.

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Agreed. I feel as if the definite article were implied in Irish (cf. the rule that you don't right 'an' twice in a row). Then again, only my feeling as a non-native beginner.

July 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1226

The definite article isn't implied, because this phrase isn't referring to a specific collection of money.

The Irish for "your share of the money" is "do roinn/cuid den airgead".

It is the "share of" that is implied in English - do chuid airgid just means "your money".

July 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charwood17

I had a sentence before where "The library's money" did not use "cuid." I believe the translation was "Airgead na leabharlainne."

Is there a reason for that? I'm guessing something to do with possessive pronouns vs. nouns?

March 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes — cuid is used with possessive adjectives for plurals and indefinite amounts, e.g. blas mo chuid ime (“my butter’s flavor”) but blas an ime (“the butter’s flavor”).

May 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Exception: "cuid is not used for solid, inherent property (e.g. body parts).( mo chosa = my feet)" (nualeargais.ie)

July 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwarven_hydra

This can also technically be just "Your money" right? Or am I mistaken?

September 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes, you’re right; in fact, it’s the most common translation.

September 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Classic. "Portion" is apparently not an acceptable translation.

September 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaurand

"Your portion of money" is now accepted.

September 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardMik2

Now correct me if i'm wrong, but one could also just say "d'airgead" for "your money" right?

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Natives wouldn't, not really. Cuid is usually involved.

March 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lillian211756

can someone please explain why 'airgead' is not accepted only 'airgid'

January 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1226

cuid is used with possessive adjectives and "mass nouns" or "non-count nouns", and cuid requires the genitive, hence mo chuid airgid, a cuid gruaige, etc.

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lillian211756

Go raibh maith agat

April 13, 2019
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