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"They need cells from both."

Translation:Necesitan células de ambos.

5 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eccp

Why can't I say "de los dos" instead of "de ambos"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

It should be accepted, that is correct too!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Right! Duolingo is not perfect. I suppose they can't allow for every possible translation. But "los dos" definitely is correct!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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We have to report it, because it's not a weird translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdantone

Except that "los dos" is actually listed if you click on "both." Even weirder that they still don't accept it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

They can it just needs programming. If its reported they'll get round to it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lroshell

"de los dos" is now accepted, but which phrase is more commonly used among Spanish speakers "de los dos" or "de ambos"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Not a native Spanish speaker, but I can quote the little girl in the taco ad: "Por que no los dos?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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they are almost interchangeable. http://spanish.about.com/od/sentencestructure/a/both.htm

but learned that you have to use "los dos" if you have to make a choice. in the plane i was asked which snack i wanted and i answered "ambos" and the stewardess first didn't get it an then said "los dos?!" maybe there are regional differences too. i flew with lan.com

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JellyLady1

Real life experience. That's what I'm talking about! Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tenie13

Your article los is incorrect. Because its células, use 'de las dos'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Los doesn't refer back to células, but to some unknown persons from whom we need the cells.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

Can i put las celulas de ambos (if its the cells of something masculine or in this case unknown things surely both is refering to the article the cells come from and not the cells from cells) could just be my interpretation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnyBGood04

Why isn't desde accepted here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigMish17

Desde pretty much means "since" or "from" when you're talking about time. For example, from September to December is Desde Septiembre hasta Deciembre.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomatosoup

So does it need to be LAS dos in this instance or would it not depend on the gender of the noun?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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It would depend on the gender of whatever "the two" are. As this is unknown it defaults to the masculine "Los dos".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rameizo
Rameizo
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"las" como artículo es correcto antes de "células", como lo sería si fuese por ejemplo: Necesitan los corazones de ambos.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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I put ambas due to the word celulas. I was not dinged even though the answer says ambos

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Could be two women.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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ambos/los dos is not refering to celula but to unknown objects. because of this your answer is right too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JC31415
JC31415
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Why is it not "los células?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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"Celula" is fem. but "las celulas" was not considered correct either. One of those times where I only included the definite article to try and please DL, but it didn't. I've asked this question about inclusion/exclusion of articles multiple times in discussions and never received a good answer. For example, some will say because the "cells" are not specific they do not require the article, just as in English. Which makes sense, but "You believe in spirits"="Crees en los espíritus" according to DL. There I was pinged for excluding the article, which I did because of the aforementioned reason: "spirits" were not specific. There are many examples like this, with exact same sentence structures where one includes the article and one doesn't. There must be a reason, I just wish somebody could explain what it is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennynica

When to include articles or not has caused me more errors and frustration than anything else. Somebody gave a good link that shows most of the rules. Here it is: http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/use_def_art.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Gracias Kenny. Since writing the above comment DL have emailed me to say "Creen en espiritus" (no article) is now accepted, so this fits with the set of "rules" I have formed based on sites such as the one you suggested and general observations. For anyone interested this is a rough guide as whether to include or exclude the definite article (in the absence of any other article).

Include for a definite subject noun (as in English). Include for an indefinite subject noun (unlike English). Include for a definite object noun (as in English). Exclude for an indefinite object noun (as in English) Exception Include if an indefinite object noun is abstract or a category (unlike English) Exception to the exception Exclude if an indefinite abstract object noun is an academic subject (as in English).

I'm sure this is far from complete and/or bullet-proof but it mostly seems to work on DL.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennynica

Thank you jellonz for your efforts but I have no idea what indefinite subject nouns are or an abstract indefinite object noun is. It is way too complicated for me who is not an English major. I only have a high school level education and I don't remember ever learning what those things are. If I was taught those things I either didn't understand them or ignored them. Again I thank you for your help jellonz. Sincerely Kenny

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Indefinite subject noun would be something like cats in the sentence "Cats have tails." , when speaking about cats in general. Spanish is Los gatos tienen colas. If you're speaking about specific cats ( say, your neighbors colony of Manx cats ), you'd say The cats don't have tails. Los gatos no tienen colas. This is a definite subject noun. A definite object noun would be milk in The cats are drinking the milk.. Los gatos estan bebiendo el ratón. This has both a definite subject and a definite object. (i.e., the milk is specific milk already in a bowl or spilled on the floor) Cats drink milk. Los gatos beben leche. Cats in general drink milk. Abstract would be things like peace, hunger, war, ISIS makes war. ISIS hacen la guerra (this could also exclude the article.) I study history (academic subject) estudio hisitoria. This can also be estudio la historia, according to Spanishdict.com.

Hope this helps, and don't feel too bad about not understanding it. I usually have to read grammar explanations in academic texts four or five times, and work out examples for myself, before I understand them, and I have a degree in Linguistics.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Sorry Kenny. I did major in English, but that didn't help much with grammar. I re-learnt that from Grammar for dummies. I'm not kidding. Learning grammar is far from essential to learn a language but it does help when you are applying rules. I see klgregonis has already given some useful examples, so I'll just add some quick ones in English.

  • Definite subject: The cat has a tail

  • Indefinite subject: Cats have tails

  • Definite object: The cat has the mouse

  • Indefinite object: The cat has mice

Abstract nouns are thoughts/feelings/etc. Things that are conceptual rather than physical. And, as klgregonis points out, there are always exceptions to the exceptions of the exceptions, so use the above only as a guideline.

PS: kl, I hope those cats blend that mouse up well before they drink it :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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Could you put "tienen que"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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No, tienen que has more of the have to sense of need.. It needs a verb after it. (Not it have to a verb after it)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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you use tener que if you have an external obligation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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What heck is wrong with "desde", since it means from as well?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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refers to time...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikesc74

I put celulares and was dinged. In Canada and the United States 'cell' in everyday language more commonly refers to a cellphone.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I think this sentence is in either medicine, science or nature, so that is the meaning that needs to be used here. Cells does mean those tiny little round things with a nucleus that make up your body, plants, and other living things, in those fields.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Hey Kl. I was going to reply the same, but then I remembered all the times DL has slipped in the alternative meanings of words (outside the lesson category) to keep us on our toes. With that in mind I think Mike has a fair argument :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Well, yeah, but usually not that far out. But point taken. However, I usually refer to the object as my cellphone (although I may talk about my cell number.). That could be an age related dialect thing. Interestingly, the word cellphone came from cellular phone, which is somehow (I am not a physicist or engineer) is related to the way they work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I'm in NZ and we use "cell" and "cellphone," but more and more commonly just "phone" (the days of the land-line may be limited). As for "cellular phone" I had always thought that "cellular" came from the power source, battery cells, but it turns out that is wrong. It actually comes from the communications network employed, which comprises of a series of relay towers surrounded by coverage areas. The towers represent nuclei and their surrounding coverage areas are the cells. (Sorry for the clutter but I found that interesting).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Rrrrr
The_Rrrrr
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Great to find a fellow word origin nerd :)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Welcome to Duolingo comments, where you often learn more about English than the language you're trying to study....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngochung72
ngochung72
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Cellulas why not ambas?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

You trying to find my son's DNA , or...?

1 month ago