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"Wij drinken elke dag een bakje troost."

Translation:We drink a cup of comfort every day.

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3 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Naylor1993
Naylor1993
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Can anybody explain this bizarre sentence?

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
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I think it's a bit of food and/or drink that doesn't just sustain you, but also lifts your spirits. A hot tea on a chilly day, coffee and donuts at a dull meeting, a nice hot meal after a day of hard work. Food for the soul.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joelson00

The expression first appeared 1878 in the Zierikzeesche Courant for a cup of coffee. The over 15'000 Google hits reveal that 'bakje troost' is often used today in other contexts where the original meaning of troost would make more sense (such as mourning). Van Dale gives a cuppa as an English translation. Needless to say, the expression is quite informal.

6
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
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"Een bakje troost" stands for "een kop koffie" (a cup of coffee).

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naylor1993
Naylor1993
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I gathered, I just wondered if there was any meaning behind the translation of 'a cup of comfort'.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daneosaurus
daneosaurus
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Coffee is a comforting thing!

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naylor1993
Naylor1993
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I suppose you're right!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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Does any English speaker on here ever use the phrase "a cup of comfort"? Maybe you'd find it in a poem, but it "ain't English"

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Db243
Db243
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Maybe if it was Southern Comfort ;-}

16
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stu516623
Stu516623
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Cultural note: "Southern Comfort" is a well-known brand of whiskey in the USA.

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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Again yesterday (21/1/15), asked our Dutch leader of a reading club for buitenlanders if she'd ever heard of "een bakje troost" - she hadn't

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aquirilaty
aquirilaty
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It's a very local expression (Randstad mostly I guess). And I've only every heard "n bakkie troost". Correctly saying "bakje" sounds very weird to me.

16
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boklevski

It is used ("bakkie troost"; indeed "bakje troost" doesn't sound right). Even then, my grandma used it. My parents only very rarely use it. I never use it.

So today, better stick to the safe "kopje koffie"... you wouldn't want to try to use hip Dutch 'slang' but coming across like my grandma instead.

Oh, and NEVER use "bakje troost" in (official) writing. Please just... don't...

17
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yruzz
Yruzz
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I'm from Brabant and I know the expression.

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlastairHaigh

Please tell me that the word "bakkie" isn't what it sounds like - a diminutive of a diminutive!

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aquirilaty
aquirilaty
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Not really.. it's a very colloquial version of the diminutive. Huisje > huissie, meisje > meissie. Us Dutchies tend to get quite lazy when we speak ;P Don't use it in any official writings though!

13
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NightCreature

It's randstad dialect for bakje.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
Soglio
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No, I've never used the phrase, but I might begin now. It sounds like a good way to describe a cup of coffee. ;-)

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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I was just going to say the same thing (though probably about a mixed hot chocolate and coffee, with maybe a little Kahlúa thrown in). ;-)

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidwinterg8
davidwinterg8
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I'm English and I drink an occasional 'southern comfort' een bakje troost van de zuid'. But comfort in the context of coffee, no.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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The whiskey, presumably!

The old English Temperance movement used to refer to tea as "the cup that cheers but does not intoxicate". I still hear "the cup that cheers" mentioned occasionally.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizaBochkareva

"A cup of comfort" sounds like Sheldon Cooper's "May I offer you a hot beverage?"... :)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Nice to run into other BBT fans ;)

May I add that Sheldon is my favourite character? As annoying and pedantic as he is, I swear, I could be friends with him.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanCaliban
IanCaliban
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In 48 years of being a native English speaker, I have never heard this phrase.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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But you learned that we sometimes call a cup of coffee a cup of comfort in Dutch, didn't you? :)

Sorry, but since we're trying to teach you Dutch and natural Dutch sentences, we cannot always use the most natural English sentences.

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wh1skers

I'd assume the closest thing in English would probably be "We drink a cuppa every day" - although it's not 100% precise, 'cuppa' is usually used to refer to the cup of tea or coffee one consumes early in the day to get their morning off to a good start.

I think it'd be a more appropriate translation than just 'a cup of coffee'. However 'cuppa' is a very British thing to say, so I'd understand not having it as a translation option here as it could confuse those from other English speaking countries. :)

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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But "cuppa" would mean nothing to us Americans. :)

1
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kousael
kousael
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Dutch coffee equivalent of 'a cuppa' ?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoWillison

Nothing beats a nice cup of tea (unless you grew up in a non-tea-drinking culture, that is)!

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DutchRafa
DutchRafa
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Why should 'we drink every day a cup of comfort' be rejected?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jake3389
jake3389
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Doesn't sound like correct English. "Every day" should come at the beginning or end of the sentence I think.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
Soglio
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I wouldn't call it incorrect, but for most purposes it does sound a little unnatural to my ear. I might say it that way for emphasis, though.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanCaliban
IanCaliban
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It sounds very odd to my native ears. 'Every day' needs to be placed at the end of the sentence; otherwise, it's very unnatural sounding.

Remember: Dutch is time, manner place. English is commonly place, manner, time.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Domleschg
Domleschg
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English isn't that rigid about place/manner/time word order. There may be a slight difference in emphasis between "Every day we drink a cup of coffee" versus "We drink a cup of coffee every day," but that's all - and it's a very slight difference. [Native US English speaker]

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanCaliban
IanCaliban
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In your example of inversion, the order of the English sentence changes to time, manner, place. English is very flexible here, as you pointed out.

What always sounds odd, however, is placing time in second place:

Tomorrow, we will go to the beach. OK.

We will go to the beach tomorrow. OK.

We will go tomorrow to the beach. Nope. This is Dutch English and immediately identifies you as a non-native speaker of English.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebekasto
rebekasto
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You should report it, though. English is really flexible about where to put the time-stamp. I think you sentence sounds a bit awkward but it is still acceptable. Jake is right that it ought to come at the beginning or the end, but you can get away with it where you put it. It sort of sounds like you remembered halfway through the sentence that you wanted to say, 'every day' and so threw it in. Or it sounds like a non-native speaker.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edwin.walker

Sounds a little poetic to me, putting carelessly adverbs in the middle of phrases.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexKarampas
AlexKarampas
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That nicely was done.

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Reply1 year ago