"He says that he can."

Translation:Lui dice che può.

June 6, 2013

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/katterynaa

When i highlighted 'he can' it did not give me the potere verb as an option to choose from, therefore i couldn't have gotten the sentence right

June 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Meade

Happens to me in nearly every lesson, it seems.

December 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/matanov

Hope you've reported it.

May 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/David_Bundy

I have reported it

June 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Konradk

Yeah, same here.

June 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jackblackch

same

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/googlyeyedfrog

yeah, i pretty much have to use google translate alongside duolingo

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JamieBlake

Would have been nice to learn this before it came up on a practice lesson. Just saying'.

July 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/LatecomerLaurie

(American English speaker) But where else would we learn it? The practice lessons are the sole format.

July 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/OnyxMoon

It would be good if there were a page before the exercise starts with a list of all the vocab and grammar rules that will be covered.

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2

Yep, Grammar has been introduced in some sections of Italian lessons now.

For French, there are awesome Grammar Notes and Grammar Glossary . Please see

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4614759

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4146584

Hope we get something like this for Italian Lessons too :)

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RosaMariaC67

Yes I agree with you on that. It helps me to remember what I'm learning if I know the structure behind it.

February 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/swissmardi

LIKE!

September 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Caroline525262

I know right!

May 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/CamiloCook

can it also be said like: lui dice che possa?

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lisvslife

No, potere (in present tense) is conjugated as follows:

Io posso Tu puoi Lui/lei/Lei puó Noi possiamo Voi potete Loro possono

August 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Klaque

I think camilo meant the present subjunctive. Would subjunctive work Possa.

December 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinKozk1

thanks

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger799175

Having learned languages at school back in the old days when you recited the conjugations to learn them, I found this post very helpful.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

No. Four words: The Same Subject Rule.

With the subjunctive, you generally do not use it if the subject of the independent and dependent clauses are the same. The Same Subject Rule says that if the principal clause and subordinate clause have the same subject, then the subjunctive cannot be used in the subordinate clause. For example, one can say: Temevo che diventasse matta (“I was afraid she was going insane”) but not Temevo che io diventassi matto (“I was afraid I was going insane”). Instead one has to use the infinitive: Temevo di diventare matto.

Clearly there is no logical reason for this rule, from the point of view of the ideal subjunctive. Indeed, one could hardly find a sentence more ideally suited to the subjunctive than “I was afraid I was going insane” (when in fact I was not). So the Same-Subject Rule is a purely conventional non-use of the subjunctive. Notice, however, the replacement of the subjunctive by the infinitive. This means that in a sense, the concept of the subjunctive is still being applied in the same-subject case; the difference is only that it is being implemented with the infinitive directly, as is often done in English. The Same-Subject Rule applies also to various conjunctions, including prima che, in the sense that prima che gets replaced by prima di + infinitive.

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/carolynsilk

What you write completely makes sense where using the infinitive in the dependent clause works. In this case however the correct answer is "Lui dice che può," and DL does not accept "...di potere." Does The Same Subject Rule apply even in cases like this?

December 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Buena-Onda

I was just explaining why you wouldn't use the subjunctive ("possa") here. As far as I know, there is nothing here that triggers the subjunctive, hence why "Lui dice che può" is correct. It's just a firm statement/belief with no doubt (indicative, not subjunctive, so as far as I know The Same Subject Rule is not required). I am sorry if I misunderstood your question.

Just out of curiosity, though, I just now searched "He says he can" on Reverso Context and the majority of the results were "Dice che può" but there were a few that said "Dice di potere" so maybe the "di potere" structure is possible here, just not nearly as common or nice-sounding as "Dice che può".

I am sorry I could not provide a straight answer. I am not a native Italian speaker, so it would probably be best to get the opinion of one on these matters. These are just things I have learned while studying Italian at university.

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ValeriePenka

could it be parla instead of dice?

May 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FranciscoNoriega

I don't think so, parla is "talk" and dice is "says".

May 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/missyjane_t

I learn "why" most in the discussions. Grazie!!

August 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Martwarybka

No idea why can't I say "Lui dice che possa"... Any explanation why shouldn't I use congiuntivo?

September 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

Four words: The Same Subject Rule.

With the subjunctive, you generally do not use it if the subject of the independent and dependent clauses are the same. The Same Subject Rule says that if the principal clause and subordinate clause have the same subject, then the subjunctive cannot be used in the subordinate clause. For example, one can say: Temevo che diventasse matta (“I was afraid she was going insane”) but not Temevo che io diventassi matto (“I was afraid I was going insane”). Instead one has to use the infinitive: Temevo di diventare matto.

Clearly there is no logical reason for this rule, from the point of view of the ideal subjunctive. Indeed, one could hardly find a sentence more ideally suited to the subjunctive than “I was afraid I was going insane” (when in fact I was not). So the Same-Subject Rule is a purely conventional non-use of the subjunctive. Notice, however, the replacement of the subjunctive by the infinitive. This means that in a sense, the concept of the subjunctive is still being applied in the same-subject case; the difference is only that it is being implemented with the infinitive directly, as is often done in English. The Same-Subject Rule applies also to various conjunctions, including prima che, in the sense that prima che gets replaced by prima di + infinitive.

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Indreis7

Why is it wrong to say "lui parla" instead of "lui dice"?

November 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Martwarybka

Because it would mean: "He talks that he can."

November 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Indreis7

thanks, in my mother tongue both verbs can be used as the same so got me a little confused

November 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/theelox

Is "lui" necessary in the second part of the sentence?

October 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vittorio339914

why is 'possa' wrong?

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/vittorio339914

I understand now, grazie to comments above.

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/inkreon

I getting confused with this somehow. =.=

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/gologramme

The same thing...

February 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/czr_prz

Yeah, very annoying

February 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/temetimo

I didn't even learn that..

August 19, 2014
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