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  5. "La zuppa e il tuo conto."

"La zuppa e il tuo conto."

Translation:The soup and your check.

June 6, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sr.estroncio

Besides the "check/bill" controversy: Why we are using here "e il tuo conto" instead of "ed il tuo conto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagicOfLA

It's optional. Use "ed" if you like...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smardalek

Can someone clarify what this sentence means...? Is it a request you might make at a restaurant, where you ask for the bill ("check")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

In the US, it's common to ask for "the check" at a restaurant. I'd say it's more common that asking for "the bill."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilboburgler

I too do not understand "check" I think you mean the "bill"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/runem

"Check" is another word for "bill".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joanbr

In the UK we only use the word "bill". "Check" could be understood as "cheque" which is obviously different. The sentence sounds like a waiter bringing you your bill, (i.e. what you have to pay), at the same time as he brings the soup. Though usually a waiter would use the formal third person, not "tu"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilboburgler

Thanks, never come across it, I thought he might have stumbled into a materials shop as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/formaggiamente

I'm not a native English speaker, but I believe "check" and "bill" are interchangeable in most parts of the US. And yes, "cheque" tells a different story. As with Italian, context is key.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

Yes, context is key: without it, I heard "e'" instead of "e" and "in" instead of "il", no matter how many times I replayed it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/formaggiamente

I see. I only take text-based lessons here, so I wouldn't know anything about those kinds of issues. I've seen several people complain about poor speech engine design, though.

You might be better off supplementing Duolingo with an audio book - with spoken recordings featuring actual humans - if you're serious about learning how to speak Italian as well as writing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

After three months of Italian lessons in Rome in a class of eight, Duolingo is simply one way of "keeping me on my toes," especially as I travel. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tobithegreat

Almost. The word "check" only means "bill" in a restaurant. An American would not say "check" when refering to their electricity bill.

I have never understood this use of the word "check," and I'm an American. So if you're confused, don't worry, so are we.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/formaggiamente

Good point. I should have emphasised this. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rsc55

We usually say " Bring the bill, or the check, or my check, or my bill" We never say your check to a waiter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

The context here (or lack thereof, suggests it is the waiter speaking here. As someone mentioned above, the waiter, however, would not use the familiar form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rsc55

I commented on this in another context, saying I believe it is the waiter speaking to someone who asked for her soup and her bill. Possibly, this waiter might know this person, hence his using the familiar term.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterB22

The soup and the check? That's not much of a meal, especially in an Italian restaurant. "Il conto, per favore" should come at the end of a three-course dinner, at least. In New York I have always asked for the "check" instead of "bill", don't know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterB22

The soup and a check? Shouldn't on finish the soup first? That's not much of a meal, especially in an Italian restaurant. In Italy, "il conto, per favore" should follow a three-course meal! In New York, we always ask for the check, rather than the bill, although the latter makes for sense.

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