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"Je souhaite manger du riz."

Translation:I wish to eat rice.

5 years ago

108 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scottej

I think someone wishing to eat rice would typically say: "I want to eat rice" in English, unless they were literally making a wish (e.g. at a fountain or something). Does anyone know if souhaiter is equivalent to want in this context? And if so, would vouloir work as well, or does that convey a different kind of "want"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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The same disctinction exists in French between souhaiter and vouloir. It is generally recognized that "souhaiter" is more moderate (polite) than "vouloir".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geertjevanberlo

In English the polite form would be: "I would like to eat rice"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meg_in_Canada

"J'aimerais manger du riz."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Algaenon

"Je voudrais..." is a little more common but J'aimerais works too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onerce1

which is also an acceptable answer which I gave. My "mistake" was to put "have" which feels more natural to me in english instead of "eat". I think I should suggest that as an acceptable answer?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

That would be prendre, not manger.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottej

Merci beaucoup! It is nice to know nuances like that, I will put it in my notes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/almostcin

how about 'Je voudrais..', where would that fit on this continuum?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"Je voudrais" is a better choice for that context. But I assume Duo wants us to link "wish" and "souhaiter"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unifleur

What about 'je veux'? Is it okay if I write like this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

That would be "I want." Not quite as polite.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariska1234567

That is indeed how I learned it at school. How will people react if I use the verb "souhaiter"? Would it be weird, rude, unusual?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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It would definitely be more polite and more formal than "je veux". Alternative: "je désire manger du riz" (same register as "je souhaite")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deeptendu
deeptendu
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We use mange with je, why is it manjer here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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You cannot have 2 conjugated verbs in a row.

The second one, with or without a preposition, is always in infinitive:

  • je souhaite manger du poulet
  • je demande à manger du poulet
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deeptendu
deeptendu
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That was really enlighting.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I_is_a_fanenby

I actually tried "I want to eat rice" and it accepted it.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myridium

In the audio on this question, the vowel sounds of "ou" and "ai" sound very run-together. (Much like the English word "sweat") Is this normal in French speech, or are the two sounds pronounced more clearly and slowly in normal conversation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Exactly! "souhaite" sounds like "sweat".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myridium

Thanks! I appreciate it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanSmyrski

Notice that the pull-down menu on this verb reads "hope for". The word "Wish" is not used in the pull-down menu definition. Students cannot make the leap from the defined "hope for" to the answer "wish for".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarnes
JMBarnes
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“I'm hoping to eat rice” is an accepted answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LesterOlso

I agree. Wish is stilted in comparison to hope to, in my opinion

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kathy554657

I put I'm hoping to eat rice and apparently I used the wrong word. Acceptable answer was I hope to eat rice. I understand why but...a bit picky ?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmel94
drmel94
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It appears that "I'm hoping to eat rice" was accepted in the past as a translation - as it should be - but is currently marked as wrong. I've reported it and hope that others will do the same.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kathy554657

Aha ! I've reported too as I think you would say "I'm hoping to..." rather than "I hope to..." but maybe that's adding an extra layer of complication to the whole hope/wish thing.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

Normally both forms are accepted. Maybe the issue here is that hoping (esperer) works well as a stative verb (I am hoping to), but in that case is something in the future that will eventually happen. "I wish to" (souhaiter) is a desire right now and doesn't work as a stative verb. You can't say "I am wishing/wanting/desiring to have some rice, please." It makes it sound like English is not your native language.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DmytroShkr
DmytroShkr
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Strange that the hover-over does not produce any 'wish' but 'hope for', so how should you know the right answer is ' I which..."?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/borthwick

"Wish" comes up in an earlier exercise but I would instinctively use "hope for" most of the time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Actually, the best translation for "je souhaite manger du riz", in my opinion, should be "I would like to eat rice".

Because, in everyday life, that is just a polite formula to ask for something, not a wish(souhait) or a hope(espoir) in the strong sense of these words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turcois

If "I wish to eat rice" and "I am hoping to eat rice", "I am wishing to eat rice" should be correct...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meg_in_Canada

No. "I am wishing to" is not proper English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildengel

Interesting that to say "I am wishing to..." is incorrect yet " I wish to..... " is correct!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

'Wish' is just one of those verbs that rarely gets put into the continuous form. You might have heard it more a hundred years ago, but it's odd to the modern ear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildengel

Tres interresant! In which English speaking countries? Also, it seems that the continuous form is appropriate for higher stakes wishing. Ex: I am wishing for a Tesla or a beach house on the Côte d'Azur etc. but rice, not so much.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orixt
orixt
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Even if you're wishing for bigger things, you still say, "I wish.." not "I am wishing...". 'Wish' is one of those verbs that by its very meaning indicates 'continuousness' and so it is unnecessary to put this verb in a continuous form.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

That's a different kind of wishing. The rice wish is just a form of polite expression, the Tesla is an actual wish, the kind you would make on a shooting star! I think it works in continuous form; the polite "wish"does not.

Unless you are Indian, in which case continuous form is often used in circumstances that other English speakers do not use it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turcois

I guess that makes sense, except that a lot of sentences we are supposed to translate don't make sense in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susanstory
susanstory
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it's sounds okay to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naia921103

I forgot what du means????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

It's a contraction of de+le. It can mean "of/from the," but in this case it's what is called the " partitive article." It's used for expressions of an unspecified quantity - you could think of it as "some" in English, although often we just omit it completely. "Du" goes before a masculine noun; for a feminine noun you would use "de la."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leez4107

How does this not also translate to: “I am wishing to eat rice”

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

It would be very unusual in English to say that.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthiasPeeters

"I desire to eat rice" , acceptable as well? Got red lighted..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iflana

Desire is not a good word to choose here. In English you would more likely hear "I desire rice" if you insisted upon using the word desire. Then eating is excluded, and you miss out on translating words in the sentence that are relevent to the point of the phrase - eating.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maud607604

The 'du'-thing is confusing me bigtime. Isn't that supposed to mean 'some'? In earlier exercises when I left out 'some' in my translation of a sentence wih du it would be regarded as incorrect...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"du" means "some" or "an unknown quantity of a mass thing".

"du" is used if the mass thing is masculine ans starts with a consonant sound.

"de la" also means "some" and it is used if the mass thing is feminine and starts with a consonant.

"de l'" also means "some" and it is used i the mass thing starts with a vowel sound (vowel or aspirated H).

Therefore:

  • I eat rice = je mange du riz
  • I eat soup = je mange de la soupe
  • I drink water = je bois de l'eau (fem)
  • I drink alcohol = je bois de l'alcool (masc)
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CemSirin
CemSirin
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I wrote "I wish eating rice" and it said it was wrong. I know the gerund rules and all but this is just very frustrating. This is just being an ass.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

But that simply isn't a correct English sentence, so there is no reason to expect Duolingo to have it in its database. You could only say that in the context of a longer statement such as "I wish eating rice wasn't so fattening." It can't stand alone - it has to be "I wish to eat rice." The problem isn't with the gerund, it's with the word "wish." You could say "I like eating rice," but it doesn't work with "wish."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kenishiag

Why is I am hoping to eat rice, not acceptable?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/photoic

What is wrong with the present continuous, in English, if it sounds right?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

"I am wishing to eat rice" doesn't sound right, unless perhaps one grew up in India.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/przemopl

sorry i ment "i hope for"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeckyLoi

you might say "i wish/hope for rice" or "i wish/hope to eat rice" but you should never say "i hope for eat rice" because it is grammatically incorrect in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildengel

I'm glad you brought this up. I am trying to get clarification about the word "souhaiter". When you "click" on "souhaite" above, as some have noted, it translates to "hope". Just as does "esperer". Some people above have stated that "souhaiter" can only be "wish"! So which is it? Should we put the word into Duolingo to change the definition or not? I think we should leave "voudrais" out of the discussion for now, even if it is a better choice on some level because that is not the object of the lesson. Anyone know ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

There are three contexts in which this verb can be used. In two of them the translation is "wish" because "hope" doesn't work. In one of them, "hope" and "wish" are interchangeable.

Context 1 (to desire something): translatable as "hope," "wish," "hope for," or "wish for." Context 2 (to hope for something for someone): translatable as "wish", e.g. Je vous souhaite un joyeux anniversaire. (I wish you a happy birthday) Context 3 (salutation): translatable as "wish", e.g. Je vous souhaite la bienvenue. (I wish you welcome.)

This is context 1, so it should accept: "I wish to eat rice." "I hope to eat rice."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildengel

Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolzinha120

Why is it not correct to say: "I am hoping for eating rice"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meg_in_Canada

Because that's bad English. You can say, "I hope to eat rice," or, "I am hoping to eat rice," but not "hoping for eating."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orixt
orixt
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J'espere or souhaite? What's the difference between the two? and when is it appropriate to use either?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

Edited 26/11/14: Links updated

From TLF

Esperer (Click this link, then use TLF search function to find word definition & examples below):

  • Esp qqn - "Mon frère espère une épouse, et ma sœur un mari";

  • Esp qqch (Synon - de attendre qqch etc) - "Espérer un miracle, la paix, le salut...";

  • Esp Absol. - "Il espère pourtant, ils espèrent tous, même le moribond. Tous veulent vivre..."

And so on.

Souhaiter (Click this link, use TLF search function to find word definition & examples below):

  • Souhaiter qqn (Synon - aspirer à, avoir envie de, convoiter, espérer, rêver de, vouloir) - "Perdu dans les décombres de ses rêves (...) il souhaita la fraîcheur de l'herbe, le repos de la province";

  • Souhaiter qqch. pour - "Je souhaiterais pour vous une autre existence"

  • Souhaiter qqch. à - "Tout le paysage de maisons est excellent, exécuté dans la claire tonalité de la nouvelle école. (...) je souhaiterais à nos salons officiels beaucoup de tableaux d'une pareille valeur";

  • Souhaiter qqn (Synon - Desire... etc) - "Certains jours je te souhaite éperdument; je me dis que c'est toi qui devrais être ici"

And so on. There are numerous contextual examples referenced on each page. They're only synonyms on the surface & in certain circumstances, but their general use is more diverse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divagiulia

The recording is not clear and makes translating confusing. Souhaite sounds as if there is an s at the end of it when the slow version is played.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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If it can help, "souhaite" sounds exactly like "sweat".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilieS

why is it "je souhaite manger du riz" and not "je souhaite mange (no R) du riz? This drives me insane, could someone explain?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

When one verb follows another conjugated verb, it is expressed in the infinitive form for the present tense. "Souhaite" is the conjugated form and is correctly followed by the infinitive "Manger" - [I wish] to eat...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasmine123214

Why not "I wish i was eating rice"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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That comes under subjunctive.

Plus, the correct sentence should have been "I wish I WERE eating rice".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tymbal

Since this is present tense, wouldn't "I wish I were eating rice" work better? I answered that and was marked wrong, couldn't that work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

"Were" is not present tense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tymbal

Yeah, rereading that sentence I realize my mistake. Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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"I wish I were eating rice" is actually correct. It's because the verb "to wish" implies subjunctive, therefore it is grammatically correct to use "were".

Welcome to the complications of the English language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

Huh?

Your proposal has a different sentiment. Adding "were" indicates an action beginning in the recent past and may be continuing. This is known as the past continuous. It's different from the sentiment here, which is more about the present tense desire to "eat rice" (i.e. from this point on).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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Okay, tell me how you think the sentence should go.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

Did you not read my comment? The original Duo sentence is fine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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I know it's fine, but all I was saying is that "I wish I were eating rice" is also correct (in a different context).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

Perhaps it may have helped to add "in a different context". However, isn't the OP referring to this context? If so, the proposal including "were" is incorrect in this context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

You can use it incorrectly for the present if you want. But it's still less suitable here. The French is quite clear. If souhaiter is "wish" and manger is "eat", why would the best translation not be "wish to eat"?

Use the subjunctive in French to express your proposal (if we reversed the translation using "were").

The original poster is referring to this exercise, not the expression in General. They've already replied to confirm this. In this context (present tense), the past continuous nor the subjunctive applies.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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I presume he/she was referring to this one, but his/her question makes me think otherwise. He/she asked whether "I wish I were eating rice" is better, so maybe he/she was referring to this context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildengel

I often say "I wish I were (verb)......." in regard to the present. It is a wish for an alternate reality.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie-JA

No! What you are expressing (in French) could be a subjunctive, i.e. "wish [that] I were..." - please see here.

In EN it could be past continuous, i.e. "were eating..." - see here.

It may feel like present tense because you may want to still do it now. Instead, you're not, although you hoped you were (past tense). And if you were, this statement would be completely redundant. In addition, there's no indication that you'll be eating rice anytime soon.

This is very different from "Wish to eat" which more directly means "want to eat". Why the exercise focusses on using Souhaiter is more a question for the people designing the course.

However, in this example you can see the intention of "want" clearly. I believe this is the context in which you should seek to translate the French to English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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That's how it should be.

"I wish I were with my girlfriend right now" (that means I want to be with her now, but I'm not)

I wish to have cake on my next birthday (clearly stating the future)

So, to sum it all up,

"I wish I were..." should be used for the present, and "I wish to...." for the future .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabellash393505

Ca va

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VyomaMandlik

What's the difference between 'vouloir' and 'souhaiter'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

vouloir=to want souhaiter=to wish (for)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VyomaMandlik

Also, what is the meaning of 'souhaits' in the context 'à tes souhaits'??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

"souhait" is a noun form meaning "wish," so "souhaits" are "wishes."

According to my dictionary, 'a tes souhaits!' is what you say when someone sneezes, and means "to your wishes" (ie you are offering the sneezer your hopes that his or her wishes will come true).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

"Souhaiter" is more polite.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IWannaLearn3
IWannaLearn3
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Who the hell would wish for that.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ikananPrincess

A simple wish indeed.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlottaLanguages2

i want ribs not rice :(

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlumyAmalan

Suggestion- mention the verb also in the hyperlink. Would like to know the verb for souhaite. Is it souhaitre? Or souhaitir?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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All verbs ending in -e with "je, il, elle, on" are the 1st group with the infinitive in -er (like manger): souhaiter.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drjanety

The English translation is not grammatically correct -- awkward.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LynnLee355121

I wrote "I want to eat rice and apparently I was wrong? Im confused why won't It accept my answer?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

Want=vouloir

Wish=souhaiter

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reandw
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According to Barron's, French-English Dictionary, both "to wish" and "to hope" are listed as definition 1. for the French verb "souhaiter", which indicates to me that both, "I wish to eat (some) rice" and "I hope to eat (some) rice" are correct choices, and good English.

In English, "wish", "do wish" and "am wishing", "hope", "do hope" and "am hoping" are all present tense.

So, I also think that, "I am hoping to eat (some) rice" is good English and a correct translation. It was marked wrong by Duolingo, even though it was apparently considered correct in some past exercises.

"I am wishing to eat (some) rice", could be a correct translation, but in English it does sound a bit odd. (Possibly less polite? More awkward? More pretentious?)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

What is really odd is that in the Collins Roberts dictionary, souhaiter is given in English as both wish and hope, but hope is ONLY given in French as espérer. I feel like the examples where souhaiter is translated as hope are special cases and we should generally stick to the distinction between souhaiter and espérer.

"Am wishing" doesn't generally work for me, except in Indian-English where the pattern "to be+gerund" is commonly used much more often than you hear elsewhere.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul153436

"I hope to eat rice" is allowed which sounds fine in English but why can't "I am hoping to eat rice" be allowed as this means the same and it is offered as a translation of 'souhaite' when you hover over it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karina_ballet

This sentence made me hungry.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VictorWachira

Everybody souhaite her like catholic school.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karina_ballet

I want to eat rice and beans.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lollylolo

Why want to eat rice? Rice is disgusting!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saoirse648230

True

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sleety

For all those wannabe asians out there

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ILove264
ILove264
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You posted this on a different comment...!

2 years ago