"Anchlann"

Translation:The family

4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Antaine1916

My understanding is that teaghlach means household family, clann means descendants through your own line, and muintir means your entire extended family past, present, and future.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IJR3
IJR3
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

is chlann supposed to rhyme with clown?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1540

In Munster, chlann nearly rhymes with “clown” in the same way that German Haus nearly rhymes with “mouse”. (The vowels are similar to the English ones, but not identical.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

It sounds more like you'd expect in the Ulster dialect - just "clan" with a "chhh" and a short "a"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Is the translation of an chlann "the CHILDREN" correct? I thought that AN is article only for singular.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes. Clann means family, but in essence it refers to children. An bhfuil clann agat? is "Do you have a family (children)"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

That's interesting, because you can have family (be married) but haven't kids.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Different cultures, different ways of saying things.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

That's true. In my country (Czech rep.) we first ask for family and if the answer is yes than we ask for kids. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1540

A “strict” meaning of clann is “descendants”; for example, grandchildren can be included as part of a clann, but ancestors never are. One could think of it as being a collective noun, like “team”, potentially (but not necessarily) comprising multiple individuals.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Exactly! Where I'm from in America, if I ask "Do you have a family?" I'm asking about kids.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicolastekar
nicolastekar
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 3

whats happen with na paisti?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

They're different words. Clann is the group of children of (typically) the same parents - the set of siblings (and sometimes means all descendents). Páiste is a child.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conchubhar1987

I would have though that 'na páistí' more commonly means the children

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 17

Scilling mentioned clann as essentially meaning "descendants", but I thought that's what Ó means (as in Ó Maoláin, for example).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

There's no conflict; two words can mean the same thing. The noun ó primarily means "grandson", but can also mean "descendant". Yet you wouldn't ask after someone's óí, but rather after their clann.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Antaine1916

Ó does not mean "descendant" (noun), but rather it is a particle that implies one is "a descendant of."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

Sure it's a noun. See ó2:

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/%C3%B3

You can see it being used in a sentence: níl mac nó ó aige.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
  • 22
  • 18
  • 7
  • 2

In school "clann" always meant family. I was never taught "children".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 17

But your parents, aunts, uncles, and other ancestors would not be a part of your "clann".

2 years ago

Related Discussions

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.