Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"¿Cuál sueño?"

Translation:Which dream?

5 years ago

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rachvx
rachvx
  • 25
  • 7
  • 5

How come "I dream" is used as a noun here? Is that normal?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrriah

I agree. This lesson is about verbs, so that's what I expected sueno to be here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiniSophia
GiniSophia
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
  • 963

I agree with you! This section should be testing verbs and sueño means "I dream" doesn't it? This was a puzzling and misleading sentence/exercise in this context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duckwantbread

I think the point is that if Duo doesn't teach you that sueño is also used as a noun right now then it's going to confuse you if you read a sentence with it being used as a noun in real life.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aljoja
Aljoja
  • 25
  • 24
  • 1059

El sueño means the dream.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeets

"Dream", in English, can be both a verb (I dream of flying) or a noun (I have a dream) as if it were a thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

In this case 'sueño' is being used as the noun - 'el sueño'. I do understand your confusion, but that said it appears that DL has just done a pretty good job at teaching you that there is at least one instance of a conjugated verbs being used as a noun in Spanish, and actually there are many, many others, such as....

  • daño = the damage/I damage

  • intento = the attempt/I try

  • recuerdo = the memory/I remember

  • objetivo = the object/I objectify

  • forma = the form, the shape/he forms, he shapes

  • cocina = the kitchen/ he cooks etc, etc.......

If you were to say 'What do I dream?' - 'Cual' doesn't fit well, but 'Qué sueno?' might work better.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maryzita1

That was brilliant thank you

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felix14578

thanks

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wendy228429

Sounds like it can be both noun or verb just like English....Anyone notice in English we dream of (REMOVE OURSELVES FROM DREAMS) and Spanish don't we dream in? Don't remember for sure but love differences in cultures and beliefs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YairTocatly

Isn't "what do I dream" also acceptable?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

No, that would translate as "¿Qué sueño?" (even if that can also be "which dream?" in Spanish...).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

One problem with these discussion pages is how are we too know to trust information given by other contributors. In a prior discussion a contributor said the "qué" should be used when it comes directly before a noun. Without reference to a learning site, we are at risk of being given erroneous information.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly.jr

Good queston

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardSmi760243

This seems to be a good explanation posted somewhere in the comments. I have found that following it generally gives correct answers in DL.

https://www.thoughtco.com/whats-what-in-interrogative-pronouns-3078142

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Babella: Good point. I made the same mistake (what do I dream?) . Then looked it up to find out why I was marked wrong.
Now I understand. why I was (correctly) marked wrong. What you say is what I figured out independently.

Have a lingot.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lawsci
lawsci
  • 25
  • 13
  • 1181

Or ... "which do I dream?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tebo33unm

apparently not :( DL seems to be limited in what it can be programmed to accept whether it might be right or not.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gscard

My Spanish boyfriend said "¿Cuál sueño?" sounds very weird for him, because he expects "Cuál" only for a choice between a set of options. Of course here there might be talking about a specific set of dreams, but anyway it's good to know that. Just to ask "Which dream [are you talking about]?", he said he would use "¿Que sueño?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gkseorjs123

My Peruvian girlfriend said the same that Qué makes more sense than Cual

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Good point. Because "cual" implies a choice of options, Irealize the DL translation is correct, understanding it to mean "which" from a choice of options.

If it says "Que," I would understand it as "what", referring to something more specific.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Quite right. Native Spanish speakers really don't like "cuál" + noun when there isn't a known finite set of choices.

This is confusing because Spanish usage of "cuál" and "qué" does not strictly match English conventions. Ironically, English speakers have no problem with "which" + noun. It's as if Duo is really trying to drill native Spanish speakers here.

More generally, I think, it's important for English speakers like myself to avoid saying "cuál" + noun when the implied choice set is undefined or potentially unlimited. For example, if I wanted to ask, "which book should I read next?", I should use "qué" rather than "cuál," even though my English speaking brain thinks "cuál" ought to be okay.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Well, weird sentences in both Spanish and English without context is par for the course at DL. This is mainly a side effect of their conscious decision to focus on vocabulary.
Another side effect, as SGuthrie0 stated, is that we are often required to perform research on our own.

On the plus side, it does really well with engagement and retention.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I agree except that I think the focus is more on grammar and sentence structure than vocabulary. Duo's vocabulary is quite limited, in fact. I'm getting better at forming grammatically correct sentences than at knowing the words to use in such sentences. This is particularly telling when you read/hear native Spanish speakers with the full richness of the language at their command. Fortunately, building vocabulary is less difficult (though I personally find it boring).

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Can you give me an example of when DL has given us instruction on grammar?
I usually find that I have to look elsewhere for explanations on why a certain sentence is constructed a certain way.
Maybe I am missing it. It would be really nice to have it all in one place.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I don't know if Duolingo gives instructions on grammar, but it is not the best way to learn a foreign language from the beginning. You could go to the Home screen, and look at the bottom of the screen and click on 'help' and someone from Duolingo should be able to tell you if there is anything in the program to assist with grammar.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

mathchoo, I'm sorry if I gave the impression that Duo provided instruction in grammar. I meant only that the drills are better at helping us master grammar than vocabulary.

Many people have criticized Duo for not giving some grammar lessons as a prelude to the exercises. I don't find myself in that camp. I think it's easy enough to locate other resources and don't miss what I imagine would be too abbreviated to be truly helpful.

Honestly, the discussion threads are my primary source of information. If I don't find what I need here, I generally turn to SpanishDict, WordReference, RAE, Wikipedia, and a few others.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/i.Quilez
i.Quilez
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 8

"Cual" is a pronoun. The proper sentence is "¿Qué sueño?"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Whether or not cual is a pronoun is not particularly relevant. Note also that many responses here omit accents and more than likely did not actually mean cual.

Assuming we are all talking about cuál (with an accent), there is no reason to think "¿Qué sueño?" is more correct than "¿Cuál sueño?" That is to say, there's nothing wrong with using cuál as an interrogative adjective. The point here is that using cuál rather than qué generally assumes we're talking about a known, limited set of possible choices.

There is no context to assert that only "¿Qué sueño?" is proper.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brrrouh

I expected "sueño" to be a verb so i put "what do i dream of?", but apparently it was wrong… :/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisWhatever

Brrouh - I did exactly the same. And was equally wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinMagorien

Sueno here is a noun, and not a verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ike1947

Why can't it also be a verb: Which (dream) am I dreaming?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I have the same question. Why can't "sueno" be a verb (first person of sonar). Why not, "Which, or what,' do I dream?" (Perhaps in response to a question, or perhaps it is a paraphrase of a question).

This has nothing to do with expectations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

"Sueno" can also mean "I dream", but I think the word "cual" would not be used in asking 'what do I dream'. I believe 'que' would be used instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kestral11
kestral11
  • 20
  • 20
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

What does "which dream?" mean? this question makes no sense to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Say you are seeing a psychologist and you are comfortably lying on the couch when your psychologists starts the session by saying, "Do you have dreams?" And your response is, "Yes, doc, I sure do! Last night's was a real doozy!" Hearing this, the doctor then says, "Tell me about your dream." Now since you had several strong dreams last night, your response is, "Which dream?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jude0808

lmao...i knew someone was going to context Kestral1's question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaet
kaet
  • 18
  • 13
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8

Maybe if you had been discussing several dreams beforehand?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamsleeping

Doesnt sueño also mean sleepy or something

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
  • 18
  • 12
  • 8
  • 4
  • 2

When used with the verb "tener", yes.

Tengo sueño = I'm sleepy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmberMarie272184

Thank you guys for addressing this. My neighbor users this and I have been very confused since Duolingo said this meant dream.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wirrit
Wirrit
  • 10
  • 5
  • 2

There are a lot of sentences like this, that make no sense word-for-word to an English-speaking learner. There should be something that ensures we see the proper translation FIRST, before we're expected to produce it. For the record, I put "How did I sleep?" and was marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Yeah, nothing like seeing something the first time before the first time one sees it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aaron85641

I have read the comment pretty but I haven't seen a explanation explaining WHY "what do I dream" or "which do I dream" would not be a grammatically correct translation. The closest thing I have seen is is someone saying that Qué is used instead which without more grammatical information is just an arbitrary statement. In interest of actually understanding the challenge, what is present in this two word sentence that would actually signify that dueño is supposed to be the noun "dream" rather than the predicate phrase "I (do) dream" with the do implied as it often is in other similar present tense verbs. Since cuál can be "what" or "which" with "one" implied I can make sentences that make at least as much sense using the predicate version. I really would like a definite answer from someone who actually understands. Please, no more bickering about whether it was fair or pedantically telling me dueño can also be a noun, which is obviously already understood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baymax602921

What?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tsubakigirl

What's the difference between sueño and duermo? I know that sueño means dream as well as sleep but when should I use duermo and when should I use sueño?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McCreee

The one with the flyings pigs

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nancy_Renee

I thought "sueño" meant tired, as in "Tengo sueño." Or, "I am tired."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Sueño is a noun - it means sleep, dream, sleepiness, etc.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanna812375

I cant remember the s pelling

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robocops27

I said it correctly three times. It said that I said "Cual" incorrecly and "sueño" correctly. I have said "cual" many times and never was wrong. I believe tgere is a technical difficulty here.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emmamorris77

That is wrong the correct form to say it in Spanish is : “¿Que sueño?”

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I believe that both are correct.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Normally, that's true. However, if this was asked in a context where a number of dreams had already been mentioned, it's perfectly acceptable to ask "which dream?".

The problem is that English speakers often ask "which xxx?" when the "xxx" is unknown or open-ended. We would incorrectly translate that into Spanish as cuál xxx?. The trick is getting used to using qué in these situations.

That's why there's a false rule that the interrogative "which" immediately followed by a noun is always translated with qué and not cuál.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

In this situation, are 'which' and 'what' interchangeable ?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Yes and no. With Spanish, you are never wrong to use qué in these kinds of question construction. But sometimes you are wrong to use cuál. Only when there is a known enumerated set from which to make a choice is it okay to use cuál.

In English, the two would be interchangeable, because English speakers don't make those distinctions in usage.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LilyTwinkl

The one where I was an intern at my elementary school, obviously.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HannahBanana427

A midsummer night's dream, of course!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngelWingLowlang

Is this Spanish BTS?

4 months ago