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  5. "Níl ann ach luch."

"Níl ann ach luch."

Translation:It is only a mouse.

September 22, 2014

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hec10tor

last words before the black plague started...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rassilon666

That was the fleas on the rats not the mice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lacebad

Why is "He is only a mouse" considered wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Because the course creators didn’t anticipate it as a correct answer. (Since the exercise has no context, “he” is just as valid as “it”.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

We would only use that if the mouse were definitely male and someone's pet. Most often, I cannot tell what gender a mouse is and I would use "it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarieYumiA

(I can't see when this is from on the app so replying anyway) The problem is that we are used to having Duo phrases that make no (or very little) sense in the real world, so we're used not to have to rely on logic and context to answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/larryone

"There is only a mouse" rejected. Shouldn't that be ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iad58g
  • 1356

"There is only a mouse there" likewise. Why is it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Technically, it is "It is not but a mouse." which we would say as "It is only a mouse.", more often than not. "There is" is an expression that may be worded differently in Irish and your second "there" is a location that has not been indicated, because this word "ann" is part of an expression "Níl ann ach". We don't know where the mouse is, just that that is all it is.

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/%22there_is%22 Seems to use "tá" , but níl is the negative form, isn't it?

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/%22there%22 I see why you asked now.

This seems to be an expression as the hints link "Níl ann ach" together to mean "It is only"

You could always try to report it to see if they think that it is possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l76bds

shouldn't "nothing there but a mouse" also be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

That'd be Níl aon rud ann ach luch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyAnn11

Hmm! So you are saying No one thing but a mouse. ??? I am beginning to get the gist of what is said but I don't visualize an image with this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna646397

Aon rud means 'anything'. If you want to say 'one thing' it would be 'rud amhain'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikehely

''It is just a mouse'' is more likely how we'd say it in the USA.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

I just had that accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyAnn11

Why is it is but a mouse wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

When was the last time you actually used that construction in ordinary conversation?

The purpose of this exercise is not just to test your ability to make literal translations, but to recognize the equivalence between ordinary, everyday phrases in both languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

But (no pun intended) "we are but boys" was accepted in a similar question. Though not a native English speaker I am well aware of the fact that "only" is a more common expression for what is being said in Irish, but where is the difference? "But" in the English phrase sounds poetic/archaic to me in both cases ("mouse" and "boys").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryGallagher71

If you're from parts of the Southern US it is actually pretty common to say "It is but a __(fill in the word)." I don't suppose every possible English construct can be thought of when creating something like this though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sabeth

I agree; however, I absolutely interchange 'but' and 'only' according to context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RalphSanvio

Famous last words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeyDuo

Is there anything wrong with putting "only a mouse"? Duo said it's wrong :s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

There’s neither verb nor subject in “Only a mouse”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieMadd

Where does ach come in? I thought ach meant but?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lacebad

It does. You can think of it as "There is nothing but a mouse in it"

Nil - Is not ach - but ann- in it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desiree29977

(puts on Dickens voice) 'Tis but a mouse!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

"tisn't but a mouse"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoraCola

tain't but a critter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BohanThomas

I put "but a mouse" which construction seemed to work for "Ionam ach fear."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielC.To1

It is but a mouse?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

It isn't but a mouse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Yes, I'd say so. "But" in this context is negative, as is "only". French says: Ce n'est qu'un souris which expresses the same meaning, ne...que = "only, but" and is clearly negative. To my mind Níl...ach is equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fintan61784

Is there any way to say "It is just a mouse"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

Níl ann ach luch is how you say "It's just a mouse".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fintan61784

Yeah but is there a separate word for "just" that can be used in other places?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

The English word "just" has many different meanings. When you use it as a synonym for "only", you use a níl ach construction, when you use it as a synonym for "exactly", you use díreach, when you use it as an adjective for "justice" you use cóir, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TORBINO

What is the difference here between Níl ach dliodoiri iontu and Níl ann ach luch? Can you also say Nil ach luch ann?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

Do you mean Níl iontu ach dlíodóirí?

Níl ach luch ann means "There's only a mouse in it", perhaps in answer to the question "what's in the box?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sissy681549

I'd be thinking of how we would translate at home. It would read; Nothing there but a mouse. Any thoughts on this lads? grma


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

Níl aon rud ann ach luch.

The ann in níl ann ach luch is the "ann of existence" rather than the "ann of position".

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