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"Il aime goûter la nourriture."

Translation:He likes to taste the food.

5 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/philipo79

Any one else have difficulty hearing goûter in this sentence? It sounded to me like bruter or bouteille

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carmelsweetie
carmelsweetie
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I had the same problem. I played it over and over and even cheated a little by repeating what I heard on Google Translate. Both Google Translate and I agree that it sounded like bouteille. Try to report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerrill

Why is "He likes to taste food" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DXLi
DXLi
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EDIT: The definite article can identify either a specific thing, a generality about a noun, or your like/dislike of a noun (in general) when used directly with a verb of appreciation. However, when aimer is used as a semi-auxiliary (i.e. to introduce another verb), then it should not be used on the direct object to express generalities or like/dislike.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye
<h1>DXLi</h1>

One issue that you have not addressed in your comment is the concept of "verbs of appreciation" - a concept widely discussed on other threads particularly by Sitesurf.

You use the example of liking wine but - I can like "all" wine but I can only ever drink "some" wine.

Do you agree that while "I like wine" translates as "J'aime le vin" - "I drink wine" must translate as "Je bois du vin".

How then should we translate "I like to drink wine"

Should it not be "J'aime boire du vin"

If so then "he likes to taste food" translates to "il aime goûter de la nourriture"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DXLi
DXLi
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This is a very good point! I posted the boilerplate without thinking it through, and you're definitely right that the partitive should be used on the direct object when aimer is used as a semi-auxiliary verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/codeandcoffeh

That would be "Il aime goûter de la nourriture." The word "food" in the English sentence is of an indefinite amount, and the partitive articles are used in the French to provide the same function. The original French sentence means that he likes to taste the food, when referring to a specific set of previously mentioned or implied set of food items.

The partitive: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/articles_4.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmarkey

That sounds like a good explanation, but it doesn't explain why my answer was correct: "He likes tasting food".

I think without context, "la nourriture" could quite possibly refer to food in general. In that case, "de la" would not fit, because "de la" - as you say - gives a meaning of indefinite quantity, i.e. "some". I can imagine somebody saying "he wants SOME eggs", but I can't imagine somebody saying "he likes tasting SOME food".

I might be wrong, but I think a good rule would be to try and squeeze in the "some" into the sentence and see if it makes sense in English. If it doesn't, then don't use the partitive article (i.e. "de la", "du" etc)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmarkey

Alright, I admit it, I must be wrong. I just came across "Ma mère aime couper des fruits" later in the same lesson. And this violates my "rule" about seeing if "some" makes sense or not.

I'm stumped...somebody help us out

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kibblebibble

i am not an expert, but i think you can use definite articles (le, la, les) for either specific things, as codeandcoffeh says, but also for the thing in general. eg, i like the dog, or, i like dogs, in general. because in french you always have the article, so you cant just say 'dogs' on its own - but as you say, the indefinite articles (du, de la, des) imply the partitive, or in english usage, "some." Eg the difference between a ) "i like the food" (this food, here, that we are already talking about) b) I would like some food please (the partitive) or c) i like food (in general, all the food that there is in the world). im pretty sure that you would use le/la/les for the first kind, du/de la/des for the second, and le/la/les for the third. that said, i would probly check it on a grammar site some where ...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T.A.R.D.I.S.girl

report it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
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[QUESTION]

Is "goûter la nourriture" also similar with "essayer la nourriture"?

Merci beaucoup.^^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enothere

goûter (vt) (= essayer) → to taste

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enothere

is there any difference between goûter/goûter à/goûter de? Merci

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mphoenix12e
mphoenix12e
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I used the translation "to have a taste of" and got it wrong. I was thinking that if someone had just a little bit of something that would be the meaning. Now I wonder if the meaning is that the food has the tast of something--like "that carrot cake tastes like coconut;" i.e. has the taste/flavor of coconut. Any thoughts on this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T.A.R.D.I.S.girl

How would you say, 'the food tastes good'? 'La nourriture goûte bonne'? (probably wrong)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samevaa
samevaa
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Can't "goûter" be savor as well?

3 years ago