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  5. "Ihr habt Essen."

"Ihr habt Essen."

Translation:You have food.

June 6, 2013

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/runnylad

Can be easily mistaken by "Er hat Essen" if you don't carefully hear the verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Hat goes with third person singular, er, sie, es...; habt goes with second person plural ihr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Y-Xie

But 'ihr' and 'er' sound the same, and the verb sounds similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Ihr and Er don’t sound the same; the two vowel sounds are different.

However— Duolingo uses text to speech software, so you may want to hear it from live speakers. Here are a couple of samples:

https://forvo.com/word/ihr/. https://forvo.com/word/er/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Griebel

i thought it was "you have eaten", how would that be?"Ihr habt gegessen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VitoMarzan

I really do think Duolingo should distinguish "ihr" from "du/Sie." Ihr is plural, and to make it cleaner for English speakers that don't have a formally recognized plural form of "you" (excusing local y'all and yous), simply using "you all" would inform those of us to the difference between du hast (you have) and ihr habt (you all have/y'all have/yous have).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnnieutah

why can't this read as "you have a meal"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/misaket

Meal is the food served and eaten in one sitting. Food is any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for the body. So meal is subcategory of food. And if you say: you have a meal, it is the same like: you have a banana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpelisek

I guess the difference between English food and meal is clear. But why "Essen" cannot stand for a food served at one time as well as for food in general? How would you translate "You have a meal", then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike_cleve

That would be die Mahlzeit I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radosnysmuteczek

But there is that sentence: 'Die Frauen verpassen das Essen', where translation 'Essen' as 'meal' is valid. Why doesn't it work in this sentence as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l_anantharaman

Why is "You are having food" wrong translation here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Because the German verb haben doesn’t mean “eating”, the way English uses ‘have’ in “having dinner” or “We’re having tea.”

Ihr habt Essen. just means “You (pl) have food (in your possession).” It’s a non-action verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValbertBreno

Why not " Du habt essen?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emi610391

Habt is for more People


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessert-Rose

"Habt" is used for "ihr". "Ihr habt essen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erfun2

It should be du hast essen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kilagen

why isn't it haben?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Because haben is the form fir wirand for Sie and for plural sie; present tense ihr verbs generally end in -t.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ccollalto

So I suppose you might say Ihr habt Essen more generally than Ihr habt Fleisch, in the sense that Essen means meal of any nature, and Fleisch is specific to meal of animal flesh. Is it correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse_Carlson

Essen means food. Fleisch is specifically meat or flesh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roebear

I thought dinner was Abendessen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SykoTech

Abendessen is dinner. Essen is a verb for eating or a noun for food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidanAron

Essen means food, Abend means evening food. Abendessen translates to "evening food" i.e. dinner


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FritzMeine

If Essen were lowercase, would the translation be - You have to eat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

No. It wouldn't mean anything. The verb 'haben' must be followed by a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceKnight

Why cant this be translated as she eats food?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Because that would be sie isst Essen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitriyRud

What's wrong with "meal"?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaaNassar

Why isn't " ihr habt das Essen " ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S851648

That would be "You have the food".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiBooBoo

All i did was type a word wrong! I WISH IT KNEW WHAT I MEANT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Don't take it so personally-- it's just a computer. It cannot read; all the software can do is compare users' responses to its database of correct responses. You'll get it right the next time around. :-).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mos3bFy9l

I think the right form is (Ihr hat das essen)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mos3bFy9l

I think the right form is(Ihr hat das Essen)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

No. Er hat, sie hat, es hat. Ihr habt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophiaStil11

Does "ihr" mean both "you" and "I"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

No. Ihr is the pronoun for “you, plural, informal”. Essentially, it’s the plural of du.

“I” is ich.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GargiShukl10

Why are we using Essen = food when it is used as 'are eating'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Essen is not used as “are eating.” They are two different words.

In German, all nouns are capitalized: Buch, Tasse, Kaffee, Katze, Brot...etc. So Essen (capital E) is the noun, “food”.

The word essen (not capitalized) is the verb “ to eat”. ich esse = “I eat, I am eating.” du isst = “you eat, you are eating.” sie/er isst = “she/he eats, she/he is eating.” wir essen = “we eat, we are eating.” ihr esst = “you (plural, informal) eat, you are eating.” Sie / sie essen = “You (formal)/they eat, you (f)/they are eating.”

That’s how it works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrRoninGuy

When they say "you" as a translation to "ihr", are they referring to a singular you, or you in plural/general?

I thought "du" meant "you" as in singular, specific, pointing-at-you-right-now kind of "you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

“You” in English can be translated three ways in German.

du => you, singular, informal/familiar. ihr => you, plural, informal/familiar Sie => you, formal, singular or plural

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